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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2004

Ruth B. McKay

The differing perspectives of decision makers in a newly‐amalgamated municipality may hinder the reduction of costs or introduction of efficient organizational change…

Abstract

The differing perspectives of decision makers in a newly‐amalgamated municipality may hinder the reduction of costs or introduction of efficient organizational change. Accepting differences may be essential, at least initially, to achieve efficiencies. During amalgamation the pursuit of uniformity of services in combination with a weak and/or chaotic change process (lack of committee structure, poor information, vague deadlines, shifting relationships and assertion of power) may undermine efforts to obtain efficiencies.

Details

International Journal of Public Sector Management, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3558

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Article
Publication date: 2 September 2019

Karina Kenk and Toomas Haldma

The purpose of this paper is to study more deeply the use of performance information (PI) in the context of the administrative-territorial reform, e.g. amalgamation in the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study more deeply the use of performance information (PI) in the context of the administrative-territorial reform, e.g. amalgamation in the local governments (LG) with an example of Estonian LGs.

Design/methodology/approach

The case study method is adopted, using data from publicly available documents and interviews with the politicians and officials at the five merger cases of Estonian LG units. The data are interpreted and analysed using attribution theory.

Findings

The results show that amalgamation patterns do have an influence on PI use – in particular, the authors see that PI is reported to be used more frequently in cases of voluntary mergers, which may be related to the different motivations to make attributions in cases of voluntary and compulsory mergers.

Originality/value

The study contributes to the debate on the importance and usefulness of different types of PI, as financial as well as non-financial information and for different information users in the light of LG reform in Estonia as being a Central and Eastern European country.

Details

Journal of Public Budgeting, Accounting & Financial Management, vol. 31 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1096-3367

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2003

Marjorie Armstrong‐Stassen and Sheila J. Cameron

This longitudinal panel study examined the relationship of three dimensions of control (personal, job and organizational) assessed in the initial phase of a hospital…

Abstract

This longitudinal panel study examined the relationship of three dimensions of control (personal, job and organizational) assessed in the initial phase of a hospital amalgamation on nurses’ reactions two years later during the amalgamation period. The participants were 179 full‐time nurses employed in four community hospitals being amalgamated into two. Nurses reported low organizational control, a finding consistent with the sense of powerlessness frequently associated with nurses. The hypothesis that the three types of control would differentially predict nurses’ reactions to the hospital amalgamation was supported. Personal control significantly predicted changes in perceived co‐worker support and help‐seeking coping over the amalgamation period. Job control significantly predicted changes in perceived supervisor support and direct action coping (putting more effort into doing one’s job) over the amalgamation period. Organizational control significantly predicted changes in perceived hospital support and trust in the hospital over the amalgamation period. The findings indicate the need to include more than one dimension of control in investigations of nurses’ sense of powerlessness and the importance of matching the type of control to outcome variables.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 23 no. 8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

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Book part
Publication date: 19 September 2014

Duncan Angwin and Uma Urs

Post-acquisition integration matters for overall M&A outcome. However within this phase researchers have struggled to identify clear links between integration activities…

Abstract

Post-acquisition integration matters for overall M&A outcome. However within this phase researchers have struggled to identify clear links between integration activities and post-acquisition outcome. This may be due to using organisational levels of analysis, where sub-organisational issues serve to confound findings. In order to unpack the post-acquisition phase, and to delve more deeply into organisations, this paper adopts a more granular perspective on integration activities by focusing upon the building blocks of organisations. Specifically we investigate ordinary routine amalgamation and their impact upon meta-routine outcome during acquisition integration. Drawing upon two longitudinal integration cases and using ‘retroductive’ analysis, two types of amalgamation are identified, namely ‘combination’ and ‘superimposition’. We find that, while the basic nature of routines, such as multiplicity and nestedness, inhibit routine amalgamation, external interference in the form of context, structural change or introduction of additional routines is needed to stabilise amalgamated routines. From our findings we are able to suggest a number of testable propositions about the factors that influence the amalgamation of routines. This empirical study contributes to the M&A literature by opening up the ‘black box’ of post-acquisition integration by providing details at a granular level of what actually happens during integrations.

Details

Advances in Mergers and Acquisitions
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-970-6

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Article
Publication date: 30 April 2021

Grichawat Lowatcharin, Charles Crumpton, Charles E. Menifield and Pummin Promsorn

Municipal amalgamation (or merger or consolidation) is commonly employed in countries around the world to improve efficiency in public service. While mergers occur among…

Abstract

Purpose

Municipal amalgamation (or merger or consolidation) is commonly employed in countries around the world to improve efficiency in public service. While mergers occur among jurisdictions of all sizes, the municipal amalgamation discourse is typically limited to one national setting and a focus on mergers of larger local jurisdictions. The existing municipal amalgamation literature pays little attention to predicate conditions for successful mergers. This study seeks to address these deficiencies by examining the premerger conditions and effects of municipal amalgamations that recently took place in four small jurisdictions of similar size in Thailand and the United States.

Design/methodology/approach

A holistic multiple case study approach was employed. These two cases share a geographical attribute: one municipal jurisdiction encircled by another.

Findings

The evidence indicates that factors associated with what the researchers refer to as “familiarity” facilitated both successful approval of and outcomes resulting from the amalgamation actions. While the study's findings align with international research regarding the potential for reducing administrative support costs through consolidation, its findings diverge from existing international evidence in that the evidence indicates operating effectiveness and efficiency improvements. Economies of scope and marginal economies of scale are in evidence. Although findings from this study indicate that there might be problematic effects regarding political representation and participation, in that the consolidated jurisdictions remain small in size, negative citizen engagement and participation consequences may be less than that evidenced in larger consolidated jurisdictions.

Originality/value

The study introduces the “familiarity” theorem as a theoretical lens to assist in understanding the cases.

Details

International Journal of Public Sector Management, vol. 34 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3558

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 1971

The Secretary of State, in exercise of the powers conferred on him by section 7 of the Trade Union (Amalgamations, etc.) Act 1964, sections 68(5) and 72(5) of the…

Abstract

The Secretary of State, in exercise of the powers conferred on him by section 7 of the Trade Union (Amalgamations, etc.) Act 1964, sections 68(5) and 72(5) of the Industrial Relations Act 1971 and of all other powers enabling him in that behalf, and as respects Regulation 11 with the approval of the Treasury, hereby makes the following Regulation :—

Details

Managerial Law, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2002

P.S. Reddy

The former municipality of Metropolitan Toronto was Canada’s largest government and a unique body. It was abolished on 31 December 1997 and a new unified City was ushered…

Abstract

The former municipality of Metropolitan Toronto was Canada’s largest government and a unique body. It was abolished on 31 December 1997 and a new unified City was ushered in on 1 January 1998. It consists of all the former municipalities of the Metropolitan Council and has reduced the former two‐tier system to a single tier. There was considerable opposition initially to the establishment of a unicity by local politicians and the citizenry at large. This has to be seen against a background of general opposition to some of the policy decisions of the Ontario Provincial Government at that particular point in time. Despite the opposition, legislation was enacted establishing the new City. The councillors initially elected in late 1997, the top management team of the Council and virtually all the residents have since accepted the decision on unification and have committed themselves to building the new City. The transition team appointed by the Province and the political and management component of Toronto have done considerable groundwork in developing the unified City to meet present and future challenges locally, regionally and internationally. The amalgamation of the municipalities has resulted in savings of $150 million resulting from inter alia, reduction of departments and divisions, staff, information technology systems, office space, consolidating of the corporate fleet and the City Service Boards. It should be noted that amalgamated programmes only constituted 27 per cent of the budget of the new City. However, coincidental with the amalgamation process was the implementation of the “Who Does What” policy introduced by the provincial government and the Council had to take on significant additional responsibilities. Provincial assistance was provided by way of a one‐off grant of $50 million and a $200 million loan. Consequently, any actual savings achieved initially will have to be viewed in this context.

Details

International Journal of Public Sector Management, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3558

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1990

Jo Carby‐Hall

In the last monograph an attempt was made at giving a short historical background of the trade union movement; at defining a trade union; at discussing the closed shop and…

Abstract

In the last monograph an attempt was made at giving a short historical background of the trade union movement; at defining a trade union; at discussing the closed shop and at looking towards its future.

Details

Managerial Law, vol. 32 no. 3/4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2002

Andrew C. Worthington and Brian E. Dollery

Over the past decade Australian local government has undergone drastic change. The sheer pace of reform has made it difficult for practitioners and scholars alike to…

Abstract

Over the past decade Australian local government has undergone drastic change. The sheer pace of reform has made it difficult for practitioners and scholars alike to document and evaluate these rapid changes and even most recent extant analyses are now dated. Given the urgent need to review trends in Australian local government, this paper examines the recent programs of legislative, structural, workplace and financial reform.

Details

International Journal of Public Sector Management, vol. 15 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3558

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Article
Publication date: 2 January 2009

John Gennard

The purpose of this editorial is to review the significance of Roger Undy's book, Trade Union Merger Strategies: Purpose, Process and Performance, Oxford University Press, 2008.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this editorial is to review the significance of Roger Undy's book, Trade Union Merger Strategies: Purpose, Process and Performance, Oxford University Press, 2008.

Design/methodology/approach

The editorial outlines and evaluates the arguments put forward by Dr Undy to explain why trade union mergers take place. It also evaluates the book's analysis of the politics of trade union mergers.

Findings

As trade union membership has declined mergers have been prominent features in strategies of union revival. Yet, there is little empirical research into the effects of mergers on the unions actually merging or on their impact on the wider union movement. Dr Undy concludes that mergers do not provide a solution to the problem of falling membership and that transfers of engagements are often more successful than amalgamations.

Originality/value

The editorial offers insights into the process, performance and effects of trade union mergers.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 31 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

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