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Article
Publication date: 26 March 2010

Ahmed Al-Nakeeb

533

Abstract

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Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Article
Publication date: 1 December 1998

Ahmed A.R. Al‐Nakeeb, Trefor Williams, Peter Hibberd and Stuart Gronow

Many large construction companies in the UK are now operating a quality assurance (QA) system to ISO 9000, yet there seems to be no available evidence that they have developed any…

1796

Abstract

Many large construction companies in the UK are now operating a quality assurance (QA) system to ISO 9000, yet there seems to be no available evidence that they have developed any way of measuring the “effectiveness” of their systems in meeting prescribed quality objectives. This paper discusses the difficulties faced in attempting to develop a model in the form of a matrix to measure the effectiveness of QA systems.

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Property Management, vol. 16 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7472

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 2013

Evangelos L. Psomas, Dimitrios P. Kafetzopoulos and Christos V. Fotopoulos

The purpose of this paper is to develop an instrument that measures the effectiveness of the ISO 9001 Quality Management System (QMS), based on its components, meaning the ISO…

3098

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop an instrument that measures the effectiveness of the ISO 9001 Quality Management System (QMS), based on its components, meaning the ISO 9001 objectives; and to validate this instrument in the food manufacturing sector.

Design/methodology/approach

Bearing in mind the definition of “ISO 9001 effectiveness”, the ISO 9001 objectives and their indicators are identified in the literature. Based on these indicators, a measurement instrument is developed and then empirically validated through collecting preliminary data from 335 Greek food manufacturing small and medium‐sized enterprises (SMEs). After testing the assumptions of multivariate analysis, exploratory factor analysis as well as first and second order confirmatory factor analysis are applied.

Findings

The data collected reveal, as identified in the literature, the three‐dimensional nature of the ISO 9001 objectives (continuous improvement, prevention of nonconformities and customer satisfaction focus). The responding food manufacturing SMEs demonstrate a high level of achievement of these objectives. Further analysis of the data also reveals a valid latent factor reflecting the successful achievement of the ISO 9001 objectives, namely “ISO 9001 effectiveness”.

Research limitations/implications

The present study focuses on food manufacturing SMEs. Therefore, it is worth validating the measurement instrument on large food manufacturing companies, food service companies, companies of specific food sub‐sectors, non‐food companies and finally on companies operating in different economic conditions to Greece.

Practical implications

This measurement instrument can be used by a food manufacturing SME as a self assessment tool and a benchmarking tool. In doing so, suitable strategies can be selected in order for a food SME to improve quality, gain competitive advantage and overcome the current downturn.

Originality/value

In this paper, a measurement instrument is developed and validated in food manufacturing SMEs, based on measures describing the ISO 9001 objectives; in other words, ISO 9001 effectiveness.

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 24 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 January 2015

Debby Willar, Vaughan Coffey and Bambang Trigunarsyah

The purpose of this paper is to examine the implementation of quality management systems (QMSs) of Grade 7 (G-7) Indonesian construction companies. This includes the initial…

2416

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the implementation of quality management systems (QMSs) of Grade 7 (G-7) Indonesian construction companies. This includes the initial motives that have driven the development of QMSs, barriers to effective QMS implementation, the current practice and integration of QMS-ISO 9001 principles and elements, and the performance of contractors implementing such QMSs.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey was conducted involving 403 respondents (Quality Management Representatives, Managers, and Project and Site Engineers) from 77 G-7 as well as ISO 9001 certified Indonesian construction companies.

Findings

The main motive for G-7 contractors in establishing and implementing ISO 9001 based QMSs are identified as being to effectively and efficiently control project activities. Respondents apparently do not often experience problems related to QMS implementation. However, issues of management attitude and purpose are identified as barriers that may affect effective QMS implementation. The study highlights the ISO 9001 principles and elements that still require to be more critically applied by G-7 contractors in order to fully implement and improve their current QMS effectiveness. The findings also suggest that, although certified, many G-7 contractors have not yet achieved a satisfactory level of performance to be truly competitive in global markets outside Indonesia.

Originality/value

To date, only limited research has been conducted into the application of ISO 9001 in the Indonesian construction industry. The research findings reinforced the value of pursuing more effective QMS implementation. They also support current attempts to introduce ISO 9001 QMSs to a much wider base of Indonesian construction companies, particularly small and medium sized contractors and builders.

Details

The TQM Journal, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2731

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 September 2021

Hamed Takruri, Thanaa ALjaraedah and Reema Tayyem

The purposes of this study were to determine the food intake purchased from the canteens or markets nearby schools; to estimate the percent intakes of energy and nutrients from…

Abstract

Purpose

The purposes of this study were to determine the food intake purchased from the canteens or markets nearby schools; to estimate the percent intakes of energy and nutrients from canteens and markets nearby the schools as a percent of total energy and nutrient intakes; and to evaluate the association between dietary intake of energy and nutrients eaten from school canteens and markets nearby the school and body weight status.

Design/methodology/approach

A sample of 398 students, aged 14–18 years, was recruited from schools in Amman/Jordan. Students’ body weights and heights were measured and socio-demographic data and three days food record were collected.

Findings

The intakes of boy students from school canteens were significantly higher than those of girls in carbohydrate (g) (125 ± 6 vs 106 ± 6; p = 0.015), energy from saturated fatty acid (Kcal) (97 ± 4 vs 84 ± 5; p = 0.006), sugar (g) (43 ± 3 vs 35 ± 2; p = 0.009) and fiber (g) (6 ± 0 vs 6 ± 0; p = 0.02). Regarding food groups consumed from markets nearby schools, there were significant differences between boys and girls intake (in which the higher intake was detected in girls as compared to boys) of sweets (g) (4 ± 1 vs 3 ± 2; p = 0.017), soft drinks (ml) (28 ± 5 vs 20 ± 5; p = 0.024) and milk (ml)/milk substitutes (g) (5 ± 2 vs 0 ± 0; p = 0.001). Sugar-sweetened beverages and crackers/snacks consumption was significantly higher in boys as compared to girls. There was a significant relationship between BMI and intakes of sugar, fat, vitamin E and calcium from school canteens.

Originality/value

The contribution of foods from canteens and markets nearby schools was high, with high content of fats, salt and sugar, implying that there is a vital need to establish a strategy and plan of action to fight malnutrition and reduce the intake of unhealthy foods in the school environment in Jordan.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science , vol. 52 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 November 2022

Saime Erol, Kamer Gur, Semra Karaca, K. Burcu Çalık, Arzu Uzuner and Çiğdem Apaydın Kaya

The purpose of this study is to determine the mental health status and risk factors for the mental health of first-year university students on a health sciences campus.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to determine the mental health status and risk factors for the mental health of first-year university students on a health sciences campus.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a descriptive study. The research was conducted with first-year students in the health sciences, dentistry and medical faculties of a state university (n = 770). The data were collected with a sociodemographic questionnaire, the Risk Behavior of Young Adults Survey, the Bergen Insomnia Scale, General Health Questionnaire-28 and the Mental Health Improvement Scale. Body mass ındex was calculated.

Findings

Among the students, 53.7% experienced feelings of hopelessness in the last year and 1% had attempted suicide. The percentage of students found to be at risk in terms of mental health was 41.9%; 39.4% reported that they suffered from insomnia. It was found that those who had been subjected to bullying, felt hopelessness, had suicidal thoughts, planned to commit suicide and students who experienced sleeping problems were more at risk in terms of psychological issues (p < 0.01). Insomnia (β: 3.341) and smoking (β: 2.226) were identified as the strongest risk factors for mental health in first-year health sciences students (p < 0.005).

Practical implications

The results of the research offer an opportunity to get to know the characteristics of first-year university students who are at risk for mental health. It offers the opportunity to closely monitor and protect the mental health of students starting from the first grade.

Originality/value

In this study, it was determined that approximately half of the first-year university students were in the risk group in terms of mental health. Female gender, having a chronic illness, smoking a day or more in the past 30 days, not doing any physical activity, having a weak BMI, being bullied in the past 12 months, being cyberbullied in the past 12 months and having insomnia have been identified as risk factors that negatively affect mental health.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 March 2017

Valerie Priscilla Goby, Hamad Mohammed Ahmad Ali, Mohammed Ahmad Abdulwahed Lanjawi and Khalil Ibrahim Mohammed Ahmad Al Haddad

The aim of this study is to conduct an initial investigation of information sharing between the vast number of expatriate employees and the small minority of local employees in…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this study is to conduct an initial investigation of information sharing between the vast number of expatriate employees and the small minority of local employees in Dubai’s private sector workforce. Research on the impact of the workforce localization policy has highlighted the frequent marginalization of locals within the expatriate-dominated private sector. One form of this is the reluctance of expatriates to share information with local recruits, and the authors conducted this study to assess the reality and extent of this phenomenon.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors designed a brief interview survey to probe how Emirati employees secure workplace information and whether they experience information withholding on the part of expatriate colleagues. The authors also explored whether any such experience impacts on their attitudes to working in the private sector since this is a key factor in the success of the localization policy. Complete responses were received from 0.9 per cent of the total local private sector workforce.

Findings

A notable lack of information sharing emerged with 58 per cent of respondents reporting their expatriate colleagues’ and superiors’ reluctance to share information with them, and 63 per cent describing experiences of discriminatory behavior.

Research limitations/implications

The authors identify key cultural and communication issues relating to localization within Dubai’s multicultural workforce. These include the broader cultural factors that determine how Emiratis conceptualize information sharing. Future research can pursue this issue to help inform the development of supportive information sharing practices. Such practices are an essential part of the creation of a diversity climate, which is necessary to sustain localization.

Originality/value

This study is a pioneering attempt to empirically investigate the information sharing practices that Emirati private sector employees experience. It suggests that the exclusion of citizens from the workplace through practices such as “ghost Emiratization” reverberates in the workplace through a lack of information sharing.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 September 2019

Subhash C. Kundu, Archana Mor, Sandeep Kumar and Jahanvi Bansal

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between employees’ perceptions of diversity within management levels (i.e. senior management, middle management and…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between employees’ perceptions of diversity within management levels (i.e. senior management, middle management and lower management levels) and perceived organizational performance. The study also examines differences in perceptions of diversity within different levels of management across nature and ownership forms of organizations.

Design/methodology/approach

Primary data were gathered from a sample of 400 employees from 162 organizations of diverse industries operating in India. Statistical techniques like analysis of variance and stepwise multiple regressions were used to analyze the data.

Findings

Employee perceptions of diversity at the senior, middle and lower management levels of organizations are weakly, most significantly and positively, and negatively related to perceived organizational performance. It has also been found that the perceptions of diversity within different levels of management differ across nature and ownership forms of the organization.

Research limitations/implications

The study relies on self-reported questionnaires as the method of data collection, which can lead to common-method bias. Hence, further studies can collect data by using multiple sources. In addition, future researchers can employ both subjective and objective measures to fetch results that are more valid.

Practical implications

To harvest the benefits of diversity, organization should foster positive perceptions among employees toward diversity.

Originality/value

The study gives new insight into why employees’ perceptions are significant in considering the possible outcomes of diversity.

Details

Journal of Advances in Management Research, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0972-7981

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 24 August 2010

Tariq M. Khan, Fintan Clear, Ahmed Al‐Kaabi and Vahid Pezeshki

The purpose of this paper is to examine the increasingly important area of diversity management in multicultural settings. This paper examines several private organizations in the…

2992

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the increasingly important area of diversity management in multicultural settings. This paper examines several private organizations in the United Arab Emirates (UAE) as illustrative examples of the challenges facing global organizations seeking to utilise a hugely diverse labour force. The objective of the investigation is to shed more light on the intervening variables that connect diversity dimensions to personal attitudes on diversity.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 406 employees from ten organizations operating in the UAE were selected based on their length of service and contract type. These participants completed questionnaires as a means of determining their attitudes towards diversity in the workplace. The data were subjected to principal component analysis from which a regression model was derived that associates intervening variables identified from the study with personal attitudes to diversity.

Findings

Three intervening variables (components) are found: commitment to the organization, frustration in the work environment and perceptions of respect and fairness. These are found to be correlated to personal attitudes to diversity in the workplace. Furthermore, location is found to be a differentiating factor in the context of commitment to the organization, with Dubai employees being more committed than those in Abu Dhabi – hence, both emirates expressed different views on diversity in the workplace.

Research limitations/implications

Ensuring reliability of responses on such a sensitive topic, gaining access to a representative set of participant organizations and insufficient literature on related issues all impinged on the research investigation. The research has relevance to managers tasked with overseeing multicultural teams and human resource (HR) issues related to personal well‐being in the workplace.

Originality/value

The identification of intervening variables is an under‐researched area that now can take direction from the results of this investigation. Practitioners will have a better understanding of how to achieve more positive attitudes to diversity and thus, improve group dynamics in the workplace by targeting these intervening variables in HR policies.

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 16 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 February 2021

Dirk Holtbrügge

International human resource management research has only recently started to recognize the many millions of people who engage with the international labor market as low-skilled…

Abstract

Purpose

International human resource management research has only recently started to recognize the many millions of people who engage with the international labor market as low-skilled self-initiated expatriates. In contrast to company-assigned expatriates, they predominantly come from less-developed countries (often from rural areas) and independently decide to pursue an international career. The aim of this study is apply an expatriate-centered perspective and explore how expatriates at the base of the pyramid perceive the conditions of their international employment.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on a qualitative study among self-initiated expatriates in the tourism and hospitality industry in the United Arab Emirates (UAE).

Findings

Two theoretical categories that reflect the evaluation of expatriate employment were identified, namely the social comparison with friends and family who stayed at home as well as with other expatriates and locals and the temporal comparison to the situation before the expatriation and the prospective situation after the expatriation. Both categories largely differ from the concepts and categories prevalent in the expatriate literature.

Research limitations/implications

The study contributes to the understanding of the temporal and transitory dimensions of expatriation, which have been barely addressed in the academic literature. It shows that self-initiated expatriation often represents a break in the professional and personal biography. It is less perceived as linear continuation of a steadily advancing career path than a restart or springboard to the future. The results are situated in the tourism and hospitality sector in the UAE and cannot be generalized to other countries and industries.

Practical implications

The study emphasizes the relevance of social inclusion, equal opportunities, a safe work environment and a relaxed corporate culture for expatriates at the base of the pyramid.

Originality/value

While research about self-initiated expatriates usually compares them with company-backed assignees, this comparison is not salient in the narratives of the interviewees in this study. Instead, low-skilled self-initiated expatriates predominately compare their current foreign assignment with the situation in their home country. This social comparison reflects their perceived reality of life better than a fictional comparison with highly skilled and company-assigned expatriates that is prevalent in the academic expatriation literature. By emphasizing an expatriate-centered perspective, the study supports and extends Piore's (1979) application of segmented labor market theory.

Details

Journal of Global Mobility: The Home of Expatriate Management Research, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-8799

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