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Article
Publication date: 2 January 2020

Ahmad Bayiz Ahmad, Bangcheng Liu and Atif Saleem Butt

The purpose of this paper is to develop a standardized, psychometrically sound instrument for the emerging construct of change recipient proactivity (CRP), using a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop a standardized, psychometrically sound instrument for the emerging construct of change recipient proactivity (CRP), using a deductive approach.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a systematic item-development framework as a guide (i.e. item generation, questionnaire administration, item reduction and scale evaluation) and based on a sample of 414 white-collar employees, this paper discusses the development and validation of an instrument that can be used to measure change recipient’s proactive behavioral responses to planned change efforts.

Findings

Results suggest that our proposed CRP scale is internally consistent (reliable) and valid in that it is conceptually distinct from, yet empirically correlated with neighboring constructs such as affective commitment to change, readiness for change and proactive personality.

Research limitations/implications

The findings illustrate that change recipients can demonstrate proactive behaviors in response to change efforts. However, this study’s contribution is only a first step, requiring further theoretical and methodological refinement of the scale in different contexts.

Originality/value

The deductive nature of our study resulted in a comprehensive and domain-specific scale assessing recipients’ proactive responses to organizational change efforts. This opens doors to empirical studies on examining the conditions under which change recipients “may” step outside the boundaries of passivity to respond positively and proactivity to organizational change efforts.

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Article
Publication date: 10 June 2019

Atif Saleem Butt and Ahmad Bayiz Ahmad

The purpose of this paper is to understand conflicts that emerge between managers of buying and supplying firms when a personal relationship (friendship, etc.) is present…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand conflicts that emerge between managers of buying and supplying firms when a personal relationship (friendship, etc.) is present between them in the supply chain context.

Design/methodology/approach

This research uses a case study methodology and relies on data obtained from 30 qualitative interviews with managers of buying and supplying firms, having a personal relationship within inter-firm relationships to promote the interest of the firm.

Findings

Results from this study reveal conflicts between managers of buying and supplying firms due to the presence of a personal relationship between them. Specifically, results suggest that managers face ego conflict, supplier’s selection conflict and conflict on accepting late deliveries when they rely on personal relationships, which are themselves embedded within inter-firm relationship.

Research limitations/implications

This study has some limitations. First, this study examines behavioural patterns in Australian cultural context. Second, results of this study are not generalizable to a broader population.

Practical implications

Firms can use the findings to understand conflicts, which arise between managers of buying and supplying firms, as a result of a personal relationship between them in the supply chain.

Originality/value

This is, perhaps, the first study contributing to the supply chain relationship literature by unveiling conflicts between managers of buying and supplying firms, when a personal relationship is present between them.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 26 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 11 November 2020

Hemin Ali Hassan, Xiaodong Zhang and Ahmad Bayiz Ahmad

This paper builds on and extends the theory of planned behavior (TPB) by examining empirically the underlying mechanism through which red tape is associated with employee…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper builds on and extends the theory of planned behavior (TPB) by examining empirically the underlying mechanism through which red tape is associated with employee change-supportive intention (CSI). It investigates red tape as an antecedent of CSI and examines the mediation role of change-related attitude, subjective norm and perceived behavioral control (PBC) in the relationship between red tape and CSI.

Design/methodology/approach

To test the study's hypotheses, cross-sectional data were collected from 183 employees working at a public organization in the Kurdistan Region of Iraq that was going through a major change. Regression analyses and the PROCESS macro for SPSS were used.

Findings

Consistent with our expectations, the results indicate that red tape negatively predicts CSI. Red tape also predicts change-related attitude, subjective norm and PBC, which consequently predict CSI. The results also reveal that the relationship between red tape and CSI is mediated by change-related attitude and subjective norm.

Research limitations/implications

The study is limited in using cross-sectional data at a point in time and in investigating intention only, rather than actual behavior.

Originality/value

While prior work shows that red tape is a relevant factor that may affect employee responses to change in public sector, the psychological processes on which this relationship is based are still not fully explained. Therefore, this is the first study that aims to shed some light on this relationship.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 42 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 27 August 2019

Atif Saleem Butt and Ahmad Bayiz Ahmad

The purpose of this paper is to explore the antecedents of top-down knowledge hiding in buying and supplying firms.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the antecedents of top-down knowledge hiding in buying and supplying firms.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses a multiple case study methodology by considering four UAE-based firms and further employing 20 semi-structured interviews with managers of buying and supplying firms having a local and foreign nationality.

Findings

Based on the qualitative interviews, senior managers were found to be intentionally hiding knowledge from their managers based on five individual, three interpersonal and two firm-level reasons.

Research limitations/implications

This study has some limitations. First, the results of this study are not generalizable to a broader population. Second, this study explores behavioural patterns with respect to United Arab Emirates culture only.

Practical implications

Firms can use the findings of this study to understand what really motivates senior managers to intentionally hide knowledge from their subordinates. Also, this study provides some constructive guidelines to firms/senior management, which can discourage the culture of knowledge hiding in firms.

Originality/value

This study contributes to knowledge management literature by revealing multi-level and multi-faceted antecedents of top-down knowledge hiding in buying and supplying firms in the supply chain context.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 23 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 19 May 2020

Atif Saleem Butt and Ahmad Bayiz Ahmad

The purpose of this paper is to explore how firms can mitigate knowledge hiding behavior among their managers.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore how firms can mitigate knowledge hiding behavior among their managers.

Design/methodology/approach

This study employs a multiple case study methodology by studying nine UAE based firms. Furthermore, 26 semi-structured interviews with senior managers are undertaken.

Findings

Based on the qualitative interviews and comprehensive data analysis, results unveil six strategies that firms can opt for in order to mitigate knowledge hiding behavior among managers (reducing chain of command, developing informal interaction among managers, introducing and implementing incentive policy, initiating easy performance appraisal, encouraging higher interdependency among managers and introducing open space work stations).

Research limitations/implications

This study has some limitations. First, the results of this study are not generalizable to a broader population. Second, this study explores behavioral patterns with respect to United Arab Emirates culture only. Second, the results presented in this study should be tested.

Practical implications

Firms can use the findings from this study to understand strategies that can help them to mitigate the knowledge hiding behavior of managers.

Originality/value

This study contributes to knowledge hiding literature by revealing strategies, which discourages knowledge hiding behavior in firms.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 59 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 5 March 2021

Atif Saleem Butt, Syed Hamad Hassan Shah and Ahmad Bayiz Ahmad

The purpose of this paper is to explore how knowledge hiding affects buyer-supplier relationship performance in the supply chain.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore how knowledge hiding affects buyer-supplier relationship performance in the supply chain.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses a multiple case study methodology. Overall, 26 semi-structured interviews (13 dyadic interviews) with managers of buying and supplying firms (who have been a victim of knowledge hiding) were undertaken.

Findings

Based on comprehensive data analysis, results reveal seven factors that adversely affect buyer-supplier relationship performance (lack of trust, lack of cooperation and lack of commitment). In addition, results reveal that such factors reduced the firm’s business performance in terms of low-quality products, increased lead time and higher costs.

Research limitations/implications

This study has some limitations. First, the results of this study are not generalizable to a broader population. Second, this study explores behavioral patterns with respect to United Arab Emirates culture only.

Practical implications

Firms can use the findings from this study to understand how knowledge hiding in a buyer-supplier relationship adversely affects a buyer-supplier relationship performance.

Originality/value

A considerable weakness in buyer-supplier relationship literature is a need for a study examining how knowledge hiding harms buyer-supplier relationship performance in the supply chain. This paper addresses this gap.

Details

VINE Journal of Information and Knowledge Management Systems, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-5891

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 19 July 2021

Atif Saleem Butt, Ahmad Bayiz Ahmad and Syed Hamad Hassan Shah

This paper aims to explore the role of personal relationships (friendships) in mitigating knowledge hiding behaviour between managers.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the role of personal relationships (friendships) in mitigating knowledge hiding behaviour between managers.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses a phenomenological methodology by studying seven UAE-based firms. Furthermore, 30 semi-structured (15 dyadic) interviews with senior managers are undertaken. The senior managers were chosen from multiple industries including plastic, frozen food, logistics, etc.

Findings

Based on 30 semi-structured interviews and comprehensive data analysis, results reveal that the development of personal relationships between managers results in higher interpersonal trust, mutual loyalty, higher cooperation, strong mutual goals and cultivation of reciprocity. The result further states that these factors diminish knowledge hiding behaviour between them.

Research limitations/implications

This study has some limitations. First, this study explores behavioural patterns concerning the United Arab Emirates culture only. Second, the results presented in this study should be quantitatively tested to demonstrate their generalizability.

Practical implications

Firms can use this study’s findings to understand how and why personal relationships between managers within firms diminish knowledge hiding behaviour.

Originality/value

There is a dire need for research exploring how knowledge hiding can be mitigated in firms. This paper addresses this gap by exploring the role of personal relationships in the knowledge hiding literature.

Details

VINE Journal of Information and Knowledge Management Systems, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-5891

Keywords

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