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1 – 10 of 363
Article
Publication date: 4 January 2022

Jabran Khan, Namra Mubarak, Sana Aroos Khattak, Samyia Safdar and Mastura Jaafar

Based on conservation of resources theory, the present study aims to investigate the negative leadership style (i.e. despotic leadership) and its influence on a key…

Abstract

Purpose

Based on conservation of resources theory, the present study aims to investigate the negative leadership style (i.e. despotic leadership) and its influence on a key dimension of project success (i.e. project efficiency) directly and indirectly via employees’ job stress. Moreover, this study also aims to investigate the moderating role of resilience on the relationship between despotic leadership and employees’ job stress.

Design/methodology/approach

This study used a time-lagged design and collected data via purposive sampling technique from 342 information technology project employees. Data were analyzed using SPSS 25 and AMOS 24.

Findings

The findings are in line with the proposed relationship, as despotic leadership negatively influences project efficiency via employees’ job stress and resilience plays a vital role in mitigating the effects of despotic leadership on employees' job stress.

Practical implications

The findings of this study provide direction to information technology firms to develop strategies to decrease employees’ stress and increase project efficiency.

Originality/value

This study extends the literature on leadership and information technology projects by examining how despotic leadership influences project efficiency via employees’ job stress. Negative leadership exists in organizations but has not yet been empirically explored; this study finds that it increases subordinates’ stress level and ultimately influences project efficiency.

Details

International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8378

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 28 August 2021

Belal Albashiti, Zeeshan Hamid and Mohammed Aboramadan

Building on conservation of resources theory and unfolding theory of turnover, this paper aims to propose a model of the effects of despotic leadership on employees’ job…

2264

Abstract

Purpose

Building on conservation of resources theory and unfolding theory of turnover, this paper aims to propose a model of the effects of despotic leadership on employees’ job satisfaction and turnover intention in the hospitality industry. In this model, the authors theorize psychological distress to play an intervening role among the aforesaid linkages.

Design/methodology/approach

The data were collected in three-waves from 212 employees working in Palestinian restaurants. A covariance-based matrix in structural equation modeling was used to verify the proposed linkages in the study. A marker variable was used to control the common method bias.

Findings

The results showed that despotic leadership has a direct negative effect on job satisfaction and a positive indirect effect on turnover intentions. Besides, psychological distress showed to play significant mediating effects among the aforementioned relationships.

Practical implications

This study gives insights to the hospitality industry on how despotic leadership can be destructive and lead to negative consequences.

Originality/value

This study is unique, as it is the first study conducted on despotic leadership in a hospitality setting. The study responded to scholarly calls made to enrich the literature pertaining to despotic leadership and its outcomes.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 33 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 November 2020

Shazia Nauman, Connie Zheng and Ameer A. Basit

This study contributes to the leadership literature by examining how and when despotic leadership jeopardizes employees' performance. Specifically, we examine whether…

1195

Abstract

Purpose

This study contributes to the leadership literature by examining how and when despotic leadership jeopardizes employees' performance. Specifically, we examine whether employees' job performance could be harmed by despotic supervision through employees' work withdrawal behaviour. Moreover, we investigate whether the quality of work-life (QWL) helps in toning down the harmful effects of despotic supervision on work withdrawal.

Design/methodology/approach

We used a multi-wave research design with data collected from 195 employees and their supervisors working in Pakistan's manufacturing sector. At time 1, we measured the independent variable (i.e. despotic leadership) and moderator (QWL), whereas, at time-2, the mediator (work withdrawal) was tapped by the same respondent with a time interval of three weeks between them. At time 3, the outcome (supervisor-rated job performance) was assessed directly by the supervisors.

Findings

The results support the mediating effect between despotic leadership and employees' performance through an enhanced level of work withdrawal behaviour. The effect of despotic leadership on job performance via work withdrawal behaviour was found to be weaker among employees with a higher level of QWL.

Practical implications

For individuals, QWL serves as an enhancement of personal resources to deal with despotic leaders at the workplace; for organizations, our study results alert managers and leaders at the workplace to address employees' need for QWL as this positive resource may discourage work withdrawal behaviour and stimulate employees to perform well in their jobs despite facing despotic supervision.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the leadership literature by introducing work withdrawal as an underlying mechanism to explain the despotic leadership – job performance relationship. Further, we examined how the harmful effects of despotic leadership can be toned down through the moderating variable of QWL thus having practical implications for both employers and employees.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 42 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 May 2018

Hakan Erkutlu and Jamel Chafra

Drawing on the social exchange theory, the purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between despotic leadership and employee’s organizational deviance…

1106

Abstract

Purpose

Drawing on the social exchange theory, the purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between despotic leadership and employee’s organizational deviance. Specifically, the authors take a relational approach by introducing employee’s organizational identification as the mediator. The moderating role of value congruence in the relationship between despotic leadership and organizational deviance is also considered.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 15 universities in Turkey. The sample included 1,219 randomly chosen faculty members along with their department chairs. Hierarchical multiple regression analysis was conducted to test the proposed model.

Findings

The results of this study supported the positive effect of despotic leadership on employee’s organizational deviance as well as the mediating effect of employee’s organizational identification. Moreover, when the level of value congruence is high, the relationship between organizational identification and organizational deviance is strong, whereas the effect is weak when the level of value congruence is low.

Practical implications

The findings of this study suggest that educational administrators in the higher education should be sensitive in treating their subordinates, as it will lead to positive interpersonal relationship, which, in turn, will reduce organizational deviance. Moreover, they should pay more attention to the buffering role of value congruence for those subordinates with high distrust and showing organizational deviance.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the literature on workplace deviance by revealing the relational mechanism between despotic leadership and employee organizational deviance. The paper also offers a practical assistance to employees in the higher education and their leaders interested in building trust, increasing leader-employee relationship and reducing organizational deviance.

Details

Journal of Strategy and Management, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-425X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 April 2018

Dirk De Clercq, Inam Ul Haq, Usman Raja, Muhammad Umer Azeem and Norashikin Mahmud

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how employees’ Islamic work ethic might enhance their propensity to help their coworkers on a voluntary basis, as well as how…

1277

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how employees’ Islamic work ethic might enhance their propensity to help their coworkers on a voluntary basis, as well as how this relationship might be invigorated by despotic leadership. It also considers how the invigorating role of despotic leadership might depend on employees’ gender.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey data were collected from employees and their supervisors in Pakistani organizations.

Findings

Islamic work values relate positively to helping behaviors, and this relationship is stronger when employees experience despotic leadership, because their values motivate them to protect their colleagues against the hardships created by such leadership. This triggering role of despotic leadership is particularly strong among female employees.

Practical implications

For organizations, the results demonstrate that Islamic work values may be important for creating a culture that promotes collegiality, to a greater extent when employees believe that their leaders act as despots who exploit their followers for personal gain.

Originality/value

This study elaborates how employees’ Islamic work ethic influences the likelihood that they help their coworkers, particularly in work contexts marked by stress-inducing leadership.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 47 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 31 March 2022

Samar Batool Shah, Gul Afshan, Manzoor Ali Mirani and Rukhman Solangi

By applying displaced aggression and conservation of resource theory, this paper aims to investigate the effect of supervisors’ workplace stress over subordinates'…

Abstract

Purpose

By applying displaced aggression and conservation of resource theory, this paper aims to investigate the effect of supervisors’ workplace stress over subordinates' unethical behavior through displaced aggression as an underlying mechanism. Moreover, it tests the moderating effect of despotic leadership between supervisors’ workplace stress and displaced aggression.

Design/methodology/approach

The data consists of three hierarchy levels: despotic leadership (top manager), supervisor’s (immediate supervisor/middle manager) workplace stress and displaced aggression and subordinates’ unethical behavior. The data was collected from 80 managers about their workplace stress and displaced aggression besides perceived unethical behavior of their 240 subordinates.

Findings

The data analysis of 80 bank managers of Pakistan about their perception of top managers’ despotic behavior and unethical behavior of their 240 subordinates shows the support for all hypothesized relationships. Supervisors’ workplace stress positively affected their displaced aggression over their subordinates, which motivated subordinates to engage in unethical behavior. Moreover, the findings supported the moderating effect of despotic leadership in the relationship between supervisors’ workplace stress and displaced aggression.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the limited studies on the trickledown displaced aggression phenomenon in the service (banking) sector. Moreover, the manager’s despotic leadership role as a higher-level negative supervisory behavior in increasing the supervisors’ displaced aggression shows the critical aspect in such a stressful workplace situation.

Details

Management Research Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8269

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 July 2020

Fauzia Syed, Muhammad Waheed Akhtar, Muhammad Kashif, Muhammad Asrar-ul-Haq, Qurt ul ain, Mudassir Husnain and Muhammad Kashif Aslam

This study investigates despotic leadership (DL) as an antecedent to bullying behavior with a mediating role of moral emotions at work. Another aim is to study the…

Abstract

Purpose

This study investigates despotic leadership (DL) as an antecedent to bullying behavior with a mediating role of moral emotions at work. Another aim is to study the moderating role of self-concordance to buffer the relationship between DL and arousal of moral emotions.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors collected two-source (self-reported and supervisor reported) time-lagged data in the shape of a three-wave survey (i.e. one month time interval for each time) from 242 dyads in the health sector of Pakistan.

Findings

The results revealed that moral emotions mediated the relationship between DL and bullying behavior. Furthermore, self-concordance moderates the relationship between DL and moral emotions, such that the relationship will be stronger in the case of low self-concordance.

Research limitations/implications

Managers need to promote a culture that accommodates diversity of opinion at the organization so that everyone is able to express and share their views openly. Organizations should encourage supervisors to participate in leadership development programs aimed at eliminating DL.

Originality/value

This study establishes the role of self-concordance and moral emotions in the relationship between despotic leadership DL and bullying behavior.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 39 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 10 May 2022

Shakil Adnan Malik, Samina Nawab and Khurram Shafi

The purpose of this study is to investigate the concept of vicarious moral cleansing and scrutinize whether unethical behavior of leaders initiate moral cleansing in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate the concept of vicarious moral cleansing and scrutinize whether unethical behavior of leaders initiate moral cleansing in subordinates or not. This study also highlights a boundary condition under which employees are motivated to cleanse their moral self-image through increased organizational citizenship behaviors and decreased counterproductive work behaviors.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is quantitative based on hypothesis testing. By adopting convenience sampling technique, employees working at all managerial levels of service sector organizations were asked to fill out the questionnaires. Being a time-lagged study, data for independent variable (unethical leadership) and moderator (relational self-construal) were collected at T1, data for mediator (moral self-image) were collected at T2 and data for outcomes (OCBs, CWBs) were collected at T3 from same respondents. To rule out the possibility of common method bias and social desirability bias, a multi-wave design was adopted and respondents were asked to provide unique keys/IDs instead of their names.

Findings

This study investigated the impact that unethical leaders impose on employee self-concept. Moreover, this study also explored the motivational tendencies of moral self-image. Findings suggest that employees' desirable or undesirable behaviors against leader are dependent upon the perceptions related with their own role, self-image and perception of leader's integrity and intentions. Leader's unethicality is perceived threatening for their own moral self-image and they deal with it constructively. This study has laid the foundation for presence of vicarious moral cleansing in organizational setup, and it is advised that researchers must investigate this phenomenon in different settings to provide useful insights.

Research limitations/implications

Due to lack of resources, employing a pure longitudinal research design was not feasible, and therefore a time-lagged research design was used to gather data from only two cities of Pakistan. However, authors believe that a longitudinal research design, with data collection from a larger sample, will provide more fine-grained results. Secondly, use of perceived leader's integrity scale to measure unethical leadership is another limitation. Although the authors tried to address this issue by conducting an EFA and adopting only suitable items, yet a new scale which is able to measure the true essence of unethical leadership ought to be developed.

Originality/value

Use of moral self-image as an indicator of moral cleansing is an additional contribution of this study, as previous studies used levels of guilt as driving force behind moral cleansing and compensatory cleansing. Most of the studies on unethical leadership as well as moral cleansing took place in the Western context and scholars' stress that culture can substantially influence outcomes of these constructs. Thus, this study extends the literature on moral cleansing and moral self-regulation by developing and testing a model in cultural settings of Pakistan.

研究目的

本研究擬探討間接感受到的道德清洗 (以下簡稱間接道德清洗) 這個概念;研究亦會仔細審視領袖的不道德行為會否在其下屬間引起道德清洗。就此而言,本研究亦強調了一個邊界條件,在這邊界條件之下,僱員透過組織公民行為的增加,以及為工作目標帶來負面影響的工作行為的減少得到激勵,進而淨化他們的道德自我形象。

研究設計/方法/理念

本研究為一個基於假設檢定的量性研究;研究採用任意抽樣方法而進行。在服務業機構內不同管理階層工作的僱員被邀回答問卷;由於這是一個時滯研究,即使是同一的答覆者,IV (不道德的領導) 和仲裁人(關係型自我建構)的數據在T1收集,調解員 (道德自我形象) 的數據在T2收集,結果 (OCBs,CWBs) 的數據在T3收集,為了排除共同方法偏差和社會期許誤差的出現,研究採用多波浪設計,而且,答覆者必須提供獨一無二的密鑰或身份證明,而不是提供他們的名字。

研究結果

本研究探討了不道德的領袖對僱員自我概念的影響;研究亦探索了可能推動道德自我形象的因素。研究結果暗示、僱員會做對領袖而言可取的行為與否,全視乎他們如何看待自己的角色和自我形象,也視乎他們對領袖的誠信和動機有甚麼看法。領袖若不道德,這會被認為會對僱員的道德自我形象做成威脅,在這情況下,僱員會積極地應付這個威脅。本研究為在組織架構內存有間接道德清洗這個觀點打下基礎。今後的研究學者或許應就不同的環境、對這個現象進行探討和研究,以使我們能更深刻地瞭解這個課題。

研究的原創性/價值

從前的研究均採用內疚的程度、作為道德清洗和補償清洗背後的推動力 (Liao et al., 2018) 。本研究另外的貢獻在於採用了道德自我形象、作為道德清洗的指標。以前關於不道德領導以及道德清洗的研究,大多以西方國家為背景。研究學者均強調文化因素會很大程度地影響這些觀念帶來的結果;因此,本研究透過設計一個以巴基斯坦文化為背景的模型、並對其進行測試、來擴展有關道德清洗及道德自我調節的文獻。

Details

European Journal of Management and Business Economics, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2444-8451

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 November 2021

Shazia Nauman, Ata Ul Musawir, Hina Munir and Imran Rasheed

This study examines the mechanisms and conditions that influence how transformational leadership affects project success through the lens of social information processing theory.

Abstract

Purpose

This study examines the mechanisms and conditions that influence how transformational leadership affects project success through the lens of social information processing theory.

Design/methodology/approach

A dual-stage moderated mediation model was proposed wherein the effect of transformational leadership on project success is mediated by team building, and empowering climate moderates the direct and indirect effects at both the first and second stages. The model was tested based on 370 survey responses of project management practitioners from Pakistan's IT industry. The measurement model was analyzed using confirmatory factor analysis (CFA). Moderated mediation analyses were conducted using Hayes' PROCESS macro.

Findings

The findings suggest that team-building partially mediates the effect of transformational leadership on project success. Furthermore, the conditional indirect effect of transformational leadership on project success via team-building is strengthened at both the first and second stages at higher levels of empowerment climate.

Practical implications

It is recommended that project managers and project-intensive organizations should strive to cultivate an empowerment climate to fully realize the beneficial effects of transformational leadership behaviors in enhancing positive team outcomes and, consequently, overall project performance.

Originality/value

This study broadly contributes to the literature on the influence of project managers' leadership styles on project outcomes. Specifically, we elucidate the role of empowerment climate as an important boundary condition that enhances the beneficial effects of transformational leadership. Furthermore, we extend the application of social information processing theory to the context of projects.

Details

International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8378

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 24 March 2021

Fauzia Syed, Saima Naseer, Muhammad Waheed Akhtar, Mudassir Husnain and Muhammad Kashif

This study aims to utilize the cognitive appraisal theory of stress and coping by conducting a joint investigation of the mediating role of knowledge hiding behaviors in…

1014

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to utilize the cognitive appraisal theory of stress and coping by conducting a joint investigation of the mediating role of knowledge hiding behaviors in the relationship of exploitative leadership on employee’s work related attitudes (i.e. turnover intentions) and behaviors (e.g. job performance, creativity) and fear of negative evaluation in influencing this mediation.

Design/methodology/approach

Using the Preacher and Hayes’ (2004) moderated-mediation approach, the authors tested the model by collecting multi-wave and two-source data from employees and fellow peers (n =281) working in the service sector of Pakistan.

Findings

Results of the study demonstrate that exploitative leadership adversely influences one’s performance and turnover intentions through knowledge hiding behaviors. The fear of negative evaluation moderates the indirect effects of exploitative leadership on employee’s outcomes through knowledge hiding behaviors such that these indirect effects are stronger for individuals possessing low levels of fear of negative evaluation.

Originality/value

The current study contributes to knowledge management and dark leadership literature by suggesting knowledge hiding behaviors as a process through which exploitative leaders unveil their negative effects on employee’s outcomes. This study is also unique in the sense, as it posits that employees might vary because of their dispositional traits (i.e. low fear of negative evaluation) in responding to exploitative leadership with greater knowledge hiding behaviors.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 25 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

1 – 10 of 363