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Article
Publication date: 14 June 2019

Payal Anand and Yusuf Hassan

Though there have been umpteen discussions on knowledge sharing in organizations, there is a dearth of discussion on knowledge hiding acts, especially in learning…

Abstract

Purpose

Though there have been umpteen discussions on knowledge sharing in organizations, there is a dearth of discussion on knowledge hiding acts, especially in learning organizations. The purpose of this paper is to introduce this novel construct “knowledge hiding” and to highlight its relevant aspects crucial to organizations.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper reviews published articles on knowledge hiding and proposes four broad categories to distinguish the causes of knowledge hiding. This paper further suggests substantial measures that managers need to emphasize for dealing with the dimensions that influence knowledge hiding acts, to alleviate or mitigate the causes behind knowledge hiding acts at the workplace.

Findings

This paper identifies the causes of knowledge hiding behaviors and segregates these causes under four broad categories, i.e. person-related, job-related, coworkers-related, and organization-related causes.

Originality/value

This paper provides valuable information on knowledge hiding acts in the workplace to the practitioners in a simplified structure, along with some practical remedies to manage such acts.

Details

Development and Learning in Organizations: An International Journal, vol. 33 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7282

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 25 February 2020

The authors wanted to study the antecedents of knowledge hiding from a leadership perspective.

Abstract

Purpose

The authors wanted to study the antecedents of knowledge hiding from a leadership perspective.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors tested two hypotheses on high-tech employees in China. H1 was: “There is a curvilinear relationship between knowledge leadership and knowledge hiding behaviors.” H2 was: “Psychological ownership moderates the inverted U-shaped relationship between knowledge leadership and employees’ knowledge hiding behaviors such that this relationship is more pronounced among employees with high psychological ownership compared to employees with low psychological ownership.”

Findings

Results revealed an inverted U-shaped relationship between knowledge leadership and knowledge hiding. Psychological ownership moderates the link between knowledge leadership and knowledge hiding. The inverted U-shaped relationship between knowledge leadership and knowledge hiding was more significant among employees with higher psychological ownership, whereas the inverted U-shaped relationship became weaker among employees with lower psychological ownership.

Originality/value

The paper was significant because previous researchers had not studied the antecedents of knowledge hiding from a leadership perspective.

Details

Human Resource Management International Digest , vol. 28 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-0734

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 21 February 2020

Rahul Sukumaran and Parijat Lanke

Knowledge hiding is a phenomenon in organizations that is commonly observed to be detrimental to the performance of employees. The purpose of this paper is to propose a…

Abstract

Purpose

Knowledge hiding is a phenomenon in organizations that is commonly observed to be detrimental to the performance of employees. The purpose of this paper is to propose a conceptual framework, which uses social exchange theory and social identity theory to advance an understanding of how climate for innovation can dampen the negative impact of knowledge hiding on performance.

Design/methodology/approach

We have reviewed papers on the concept of knowledge hiding, social identity theory, social exchange theory as well as the literature on climate for innovation, in order to draw the relationships and propose a framework.

Findings

Based on the papers reviewed, this study conceptually advances the understanding that an organizational factor such as “climate for innovation” would prove beneficial to check and reduce knowledge hiding behavior i.e. unhide the knowledge and subsequently improve performance of employees in organizations.

Practical implications

This study proposes climate for innovation, as a factor that would influence the negative impact of knowledge hiding on performance. It is under the control of the managers to create such environment in their teams and the work settings, which would help un-hide the knowledge, and thereby promoting performance at workplace.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the literature on knowledge hiding as well as the climate for innovation. This is the first work to propose an interaction of climate of innovation with knowledge hiding behavior and their overall impact on performance. The framework is explained in a simple term, to bridge the gap between academics and practitioner world.

Details

Development and Learning in Organizations: An International Journal, vol. 35 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7282

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 25 October 2018

Abraham Cyril Issac and Rupashree Baral

There are always ways of giving answers without actually giving them. This is highly visible across different organizations these days. When the emphasis is on openness…

Abstract

Purpose

There are always ways of giving answers without actually giving them. This is highly visible across different organizations these days. When the emphasis is on openness and knowledge sharing, there is an equivalent construct which takes up a totally different position known as knowledge hiding. The purpose of this paper is to decipher this novel construct knowledge hiding and to understand how unique and different it is from other prominent organizational behaviors.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper draws from published literature on knowledge hiding research to illustrate the uniqueness of the construct within organizational contexts and possible knowledge management strategies.

Findings

The paper dissects the construct knowledge hiding in organizations, illustrates how different it is from other prominent organizational behaviors, identifies the strategic factors engendering knowledge hiding, and warrants the effective addressal of the same.

Practical implications

The paper provides strategic insights and practical thinking that have influenced some of the world’s leading organizations.

Originality/value

The most critical element in the knowledge management process is not to facilitate knowledge sharing rather prevent inherent knowledge hiding. This paper attempts to address different dimensions of knowledge hiding and how to properly understand, analyze, and master the construct of knowledge hiding for organizational benefit.

Details

Human Resource Management International Digest, vol. 26 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-0734

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 19 August 2021

Talat Islam, Ishfaq Ahmed, Ahmad Usman and Muhammad Ali

Abusive supervision is found to influence the workplace negatively but how it predicts knowledge hiding behavior is an area that has not gained due attention in the…

Abstract

Purpose

Abusive supervision is found to influence the workplace negatively but how it predicts knowledge hiding behavior is an area that has not gained due attention in the literature. To this backdrop, this study aims to investigate the effect of abusive supervision on knowledge hiding behavior considering future orientation and Islamic work ethics (IWE) as moderators.

Design/methodology/approach

The data from 396 employees, working in both manufacturing and service sectors, is collected through a questionnaire-based survey in two-lags between November 2019 and January 2020.

Findings

Structural equation modeling highlighted that a positive relationship exists between abusive supervision and knowledge hiding behavior. Moreover, higher levels of IWE and future orientation are found to weaken the said relationship.

Practical implications

This paper provides practical understandings into extenuating the destructive effects of the dark side of leadership (abusive supervision), a prevalent issue in Asian societies, through the lens of personality (future orientation) and belief (IWE).

Originality/value

This study adds value by investigating the relationship between abusive supervision and knowledge hiding by demonstrating the moderating effects of IWE and future orientation in the context of Pakistan.

Details

Management Research Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8269

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 23 August 2021

José Arias-Pérez and Juan Vélez-Jaramillo

Artificial intelligence (AI) will be performing 52% of the tasks in companies by 2025. The increasing adoption of AI is generating technological turbulence in the business…

Abstract

Purpose

Artificial intelligence (AI) will be performing 52% of the tasks in companies by 2025. The increasing adoption of AI is generating technological turbulence in the business environment. Previous studies have also shown that employees are aware of the high risk of losing their jobs when being replaced by AI. The risk of employees engaging in opportunistic behaviors, such as knowledge hiding, is thus fairly high. Therefore, the aim of this paper is to analyze the mediating effect of employee’s AI awareness on the relationship between technological turbulence generated by AI and the three types of knowledge hiding: evasive hiding, playing dumb and rationalized hiding.

Design/methodology/approach

Structural equations by the partial least squares method were used to test the proposed research model.

Findings

The most interesting finding is that employee’s AI and robotics awareness fulfills almost all mediating functions in the relationship between technological turbulence generated by AI and the three types of knowledge hiding.

Originality/value

The results show that knowledge hiding in the digital age is first and foremost a strategy by employees to sabotage and induce failure in process automation, to reduce the risk of being replaced in the workplace by AI. This study indicates that employees are willing to hide knowledge in all possible ways when perception that AI is a threat to their job increases. In other words, technological turbulence generated by AI and employee’s AI awareness are the two great new triggers of knowledge hiding in the digital age.

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Article
Publication date: 19 July 2021

Atif Saleem Butt, Ahmad Bayiz Ahmad and Syed Hamad Hassan Shah

This paper aims to explore the role of personal relationships (friendships) in mitigating knowledge hiding behaviour between managers.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the role of personal relationships (friendships) in mitigating knowledge hiding behaviour between managers.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses a phenomenological methodology by studying seven UAE-based firms. Furthermore, 30 semi-structured (15 dyadic) interviews with senior managers are undertaken. The senior managers were chosen from multiple industries including plastic, frozen food, logistics, etc.

Findings

Based on 30 semi-structured interviews and comprehensive data analysis, results reveal that the development of personal relationships between managers results in higher interpersonal trust, mutual loyalty, higher cooperation, strong mutual goals and cultivation of reciprocity. The result further states that these factors diminish knowledge hiding behaviour between them.

Research limitations/implications

This study has some limitations. First, this study explores behavioural patterns concerning the United Arab Emirates culture only. Second, the results presented in this study should be quantitatively tested to demonstrate their generalizability.

Practical implications

Firms can use this study’s findings to understand how and why personal relationships between managers within firms diminish knowledge hiding behaviour.

Originality/value

There is a dire need for research exploring how knowledge hiding can be mitigated in firms. This paper addresses this gap by exploring the role of personal relationships in the knowledge hiding literature.

Details

VINE Journal of Information and Knowledge Management Systems, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-5891

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 16 July 2021

Upasna A. Agarwal, James Avey and Keke Wu

This study aims to investigate the differential roles of self-esteem and co-rumination in the mediated relationship between abusive supervision and knowledge hiding via…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the differential roles of self-esteem and co-rumination in the mediated relationship between abusive supervision and knowledge hiding via psychological safety.

Design/methodology/approach

The study used a three-wave time-lagged design and data were collected from 388 full-time employees in India.

Findings

The results show that psychological safety mediated the impact abusive supervision had on knowledge hiding. Further, this impact was weakened by higher self-esteem as employees with higher self-esteem were less affected by the impact of abusive supervision on psychological safety and knowledge hiding; but this impact was amplified by more co-rumination as employees who co-ruminated more were also more affected by abusive supervision in psychological safety and knowledge hiding.

Research limitations/implications

A cross-sectional design and the use of self-reported questionnaires are a few limitations of this study.

Originality/value

This study took a purposeful deviation from the traditional path of organizational justice to the study of abusive supervision and psychological safety and endeavored an alternate route, one of resource conservation. Further, employees have diverse reasons that heighten or dampen their inclination to hide knowledge from others in the workplace. The study examines co-rumination and self-esteem as possible boundary conditions.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 7 July 2021

Hakan Erkutlu and Jamel Chafra

This study aims to build a moderated mediation model to investigate the roles that trust in the leader and follower Machiavellianism can play in the relationship between…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to build a moderated mediation model to investigate the roles that trust in the leader and follower Machiavellianism can play in the relationship between moral disengagement of the leader and hiding of knowledge of the followers.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were gathered from eight universities in Turkey using a set of 72 matched leader (dean)–follower (faculty member) questionnaires. The hypotheses were tested with multiple regression, moderated regression and bootstrapping analyses.

Findings

The findings reveal that leader moral disengagement positively influences follower knowledge hiding, while trust in the leader mediates this influence and follower Machiavellianism not only moderates the relationship between leader moral disengagement and trust in the leader but also reduces the indirect relationship between leader moral disengagement and follower knowledge hiding through trust in the leader.

Research limitations/implications

Even though measurements of research variables were collected from different sources and with time separation, common method bias might have existed. Also, this research is carried out in a single cultural context posing the issue of the generalizability of our findings to other cultural contexts.

Originality/value

The main contribution of this study is to construct and investigate a conceptual model that focuses on the possible effect of moral disengagement of the leader on knowledge hiding by the followers. Also, by supporting the mediating role of trust in the leader, this research reveals that followers of leaders with high moral disengagement are more prone to indulge in the hiding of knowledge. Moreover, the moderating role of follower Machiavellianism, found in this study, provides an additional understanding that followers may vary in the degree to which they are sensitive to the leader's influence.

Details

Journal of Economic and Administrative Sciences, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1026-4116

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 7 June 2021

Talat Islam, Arooba Chaudhary and Muhammad Faisal Aziz

This study aims to examine the effect of knowledge hiding (KH) on organizational citizenship behavior toward individuals (OCBI) through the mediation of self-conscious…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the effect of knowledge hiding (KH) on organizational citizenship behavior toward individuals (OCBI) through the mediation of self-conscious emotions (SCE), namely, shame and guilt. This paper further considers the supervisor’s Islamic work ethics (IWE) as a conditional variable.

Design/methodology/approach

In this quantity-based research, this paper collected data from 473 employees working in various service and manufacturing organizations through Google form at two-lags.

Findings

The study applied structural equation modeling and identified that employees experience SCE due to KH. More specifically, rationalized hiding was found to have a negative effect, whereas playing dumb and evasive hiding was found to have a positive effect on shame and guilt. The results also revealed SCE (shame and guilt) as mediators between KH and OCBI. Further, the supervisor’s IWE was found to be a conditional variable to strengthen the association between KH and SCE.

Research limitations/implications

The study collected data from a single source. However, the issue of common method variance was tackled through time-lags.

Practical implications

The study suggests that supervisors must communicate with employees about the negative outcomes of KH. They must create such an environment that discourages the engagement of employees in KH and encourages the employees to engage themselves in helping behaviors to maintain a productive and creative work environment.

Originality/value

This study adds to the limited literature on the emotional consequences of KH from knowledge hiders’ perspective and unfolds the behavior-emotion-behavior sequence through the emotional pathway. More specifically, this study examined the negative emotional effect of hiding the knowledge that leads to compensatory strategy (organizational citizenship behavior) through SCE (shame and guilt). Finally, zooming into SCE, this study elucidates the supervisor’s IWE as a conditional variable.

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