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Article
Publication date: 26 May 2022

Parijat  Lanke

The purpose of this paper is twofold, first is to conceptualize the role of “psychological danger” and the consequent “interpersonal distrust” as the cause of knowledge

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is twofold, first is to conceptualize the role of “psychological danger” and the consequent “interpersonal distrust” as the cause of knowledge hiding in organizations. Second, it proposes the role of “compassion” training to tackle this challenge to knowledge hiding. Thus, the overall idea contributes to the ongoing conversation on knowledge hiding and provides new insights into tackling the same.

Design/methodology

This paper uses an integrative review technique to conceptualize the proposed relationships for model development. Extant work on knowledge hiding and its antecedents were reviewed to propose the new antecedents and outline how the compassion training may help combat the challenge posed. A theoretical lens of social exchange theory forms the basis for the proposed relationship.

Findings

This study forwards the reasons for knowledge hiding and the ways to tackle it. We observe that “psychological danger” (opposite of psychological safety) might lead to an interpersonal distrust between employees, and this may finally lead to knowledge hiding behavior. This interpersonal transaction leading to hiding behavior could be regulated by the compassion developed in an employee via training.

Originality

Although the research on “knowledge hiding” is progressing, there is still a lack of focus on findings answers to the challenges of the way “knowledge hiding” behavior is triggered. This study is unique in its proposal of an organizational intervention of “compassion” to tackle knowledge hiding.

Research implications

This study proposes a new set of antecedents to the knowledge hiding behavior. It also conceptualizes a moderated mediation model that could be tested in future research. Future studies may employ an intervention-based experimental or longitudinal survey research to study the proposed relationship.

Practical implications

This research takes cognizance of the challenge organizations face due to knowledge hiding behavior and how it degrades the knowledge management systems. It proposes that if employees are provided with compassion training, it may help check the issue of “knowledge hiding.”

Details

Development and Learning in Organizations: An International Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7282

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 June 2019

Payal Anand and Yusuf Hassan

Though there have been umpteen discussions on knowledge sharing in organizations, there is a dearth of discussion on knowledge hiding acts, especially in learning…

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Abstract

Purpose

Though there have been umpteen discussions on knowledge sharing in organizations, there is a dearth of discussion on knowledge hiding acts, especially in learning organizations. The purpose of this paper is to introduce this novel construct “knowledge hiding” and to highlight its relevant aspects crucial to organizations.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper reviews published articles on knowledge hiding and proposes four broad categories to distinguish the causes of knowledge hiding. This paper further suggests substantial measures that managers need to emphasize for dealing with the dimensions that influence knowledge hiding acts, to alleviate or mitigate the causes behind knowledge hiding acts at the workplace.

Findings

This paper identifies the causes of knowledge hiding behaviors and segregates these causes under four broad categories, i.e. person-related, job-related, coworkers-related, and organization-related causes.

Originality/value

This paper provides valuable information on knowledge hiding acts in the workplace to the practitioners in a simplified structure, along with some practical remedies to manage such acts.

Details

Development and Learning in Organizations: An International Journal, vol. 33 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7282

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 February 2020

The authors wanted to study the antecedents of knowledge hiding from a leadership perspective.

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Abstract

Purpose

The authors wanted to study the antecedents of knowledge hiding from a leadership perspective.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors tested two hypotheses on high-tech employees in China. H1 was: “There is a curvilinear relationship between knowledge leadership and knowledge hiding behaviors.” H2 was: “Psychological ownership moderates the inverted U-shaped relationship between knowledge leadership and employees’ knowledge hiding behaviors such that this relationship is more pronounced among employees with high psychological ownership compared to employees with low psychological ownership.”

Findings

Results revealed an inverted U-shaped relationship between knowledge leadership and knowledge hiding. Psychological ownership moderates the link between knowledge leadership and knowledge hiding. The inverted U-shaped relationship between knowledge leadership and knowledge hiding was more significant among employees with higher psychological ownership, whereas the inverted U-shaped relationship became weaker among employees with lower psychological ownership.

Originality/value

The paper was significant because previous researchers had not studied the antecedents of knowledge hiding from a leadership perspective.

Details

Human Resource Management International Digest , vol. 28 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-0734

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 February 2020

Rahul Sukumaran and Parijat Lanke

Knowledge hiding is a phenomenon in organizations that is commonly observed to be detrimental to the performance of employees. The purpose of this paper is to propose a…

600

Abstract

Purpose

Knowledge hiding is a phenomenon in organizations that is commonly observed to be detrimental to the performance of employees. The purpose of this paper is to propose a conceptual framework, which uses social exchange theory and social identity theory to advance an understanding of how climate for innovation can dampen the negative impact of knowledge hiding on performance.

Design/methodology/approach

We have reviewed papers on the concept of knowledge hiding, social identity theory, social exchange theory as well as the literature on climate for innovation, in order to draw the relationships and propose a framework.

Findings

Based on the papers reviewed, this study conceptually advances the understanding that an organizational factor such as “climate for innovation” would prove beneficial to check and reduce knowledge hiding behavior i.e. unhide the knowledge and subsequently improve performance of employees in organizations.

Practical implications

This study proposes climate for innovation, as a factor that would influence the negative impact of knowledge hiding on performance. It is under the control of the managers to create such environment in their teams and the work settings, which would help un-hide the knowledge, and thereby promoting performance at workplace.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the literature on knowledge hiding as well as the climate for innovation. This is the first work to propose an interaction of climate of innovation with knowledge hiding behavior and their overall impact on performance. The framework is explained in a simple term, to bridge the gap between academics and practitioner world.

Details

Development and Learning in Organizations: An International Journal, vol. 35 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7282

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 October 2018

Abraham Cyril Issac and Rupashree Baral

There are always ways of giving answers without actually giving them. This is highly visible across different organizations these days. When the emphasis is on openness…

Abstract

Purpose

There are always ways of giving answers without actually giving them. This is highly visible across different organizations these days. When the emphasis is on openness and knowledge sharing, there is an equivalent construct which takes up a totally different position known as knowledge hiding. The purpose of this paper is to decipher this novel construct knowledge hiding and to understand how unique and different it is from other prominent organizational behaviors.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper draws from published literature on knowledge hiding research to illustrate the uniqueness of the construct within organizational contexts and possible knowledge management strategies.

Findings

The paper dissects the construct knowledge hiding in organizations, illustrates how different it is from other prominent organizational behaviors, identifies the strategic factors engendering knowledge hiding, and warrants the effective addressal of the same.

Practical implications

The paper provides strategic insights and practical thinking that have influenced some of the world’s leading organizations.

Originality/value

The most critical element in the knowledge management process is not to facilitate knowledge sharing rather prevent inherent knowledge hiding. This paper attempts to address different dimensions of knowledge hiding and how to properly understand, analyze, and master the construct of knowledge hiding for organizational benefit.

Details

Human Resource Management International Digest, vol. 26 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-0734

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 September 2022

Namra Mubarak, Jabran Khan and Atasya Osmadi

Numerous studies have linked the role of knowledge sharing with project success, while limited attention has been given to the consequences of knowledge hiding. The…

Abstract

Purpose

Numerous studies have linked the role of knowledge sharing with project success, while limited attention has been given to the consequences of knowledge hiding. The unwillingness of leaders to share information may cause the failure of assigned tasks, thus affecting the success of any project. Withholding information by leaders can potentially result in incomplete ideas, thus causing poor innovative work behaviour (IWB) among employees. Despite such knowledge-hiding behaviour, most employees continue working positively towards IWB.

Design/methodology/approach

In order to test these proposed hypotheses, data were collected from active information technology (IT) projects using purposive sampling technique. The purposive sampling method was selected to specifically focus on projects that require innovation. A total of 324 responses were considered for final analyses, which were collected in time lag.

Findings

The study outcomes amplified the important issue of knowledge-hiding behaviour among leaders that adversely affected the IT project industry and how such behaviour led to failure as a result of poor IWB. Apparently, IWB intervened between knowledge-hiding behaviour among leaders and project success. However, high curiosity among employees seemed to reduce the negative effects of knowledge-hiding behaviour among leaders.

Originality/value

This study substantially adds to the leadership literature and holds immense importance for project professionals by drawing their attention to the neglected area causing project failure.

Details

International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8378

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 September 2022

Kim-Lim Tan, Ivy S.H. Hii and Kevin Chuen-Kong Cheong

The recent COVID-19 pandemic caused a severe economic downturn. Employees working in these organisations face employment uncertainty. The pandemic disrupted their daily…

Abstract

Purpose

The recent COVID-19 pandemic caused a severe economic downturn. Employees working in these organisations face employment uncertainty. The pandemic disrupted their daily routines, and it added a layer of complexity to the already resource-constrained environment. During these times, employees would conserve their resources to maintain competitiveness, one of which is knowledge hiding. While economic activities are resuming, the appearance of new variants could mean the transition towards endemicity could be put on hold. Hence, there is a need to rethink the behaviour of employees as they would have elevated levels of anxiety towards resuming daily work activities. Therefore, this study aims to address the question of understanding employees’ perspectives toward knowledge sharing and knowledge hiding.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing on the conservation of resources theory, social learning theory and the social exchange theory (SET), a conceptual framework involving ethical leadership was developed to examine if knowledge hiding or knowledge sharing behaviour is a resource for employees during these times. The partial least squares method of structural equation modelling was used to analyse results from 271 white-collar employees from Singapore.

Findings

The results show that ethical leadership encourages knowledge sharing but does not reduce knowledge hiding. At the same time, knowledge hiding, not knowledge sharing, improves one’s perception of work performance. Additionally, psychological safety is the key construct that reduces knowledge hiding and encourages sharing behaviour.

Originality/value

Overall, this study extends the theories, demonstrating that, first and foremost, knowledge hiding is a form of resource that provides employees with an added advantage in work performance during the endemic. At the same time, we provide a new perspective that ethical leaders’ demonstration of integrity, honesty and altruism alone is insufficient to encourage knowledge sharing or reduce knowledge hiding. It must lead to a psychologically safe environment.

Details

VINE Journal of Information and Knowledge Management Systems, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-5891

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 29 August 2022

Abdul Gaffar Khan, Yan Li, Zubair Akram and Umair Akram

Extant scholars identified negative workplace gossip as a social stressor that negatively influences employees’ behavior and attitude. Despite the burgeoning interest in…

Abstract

Purpose

Extant scholars identified negative workplace gossip as a social stressor that negatively influences employees’ behavior and attitude. Despite the burgeoning interest in workplace stressors, limited studies have explored how the detrimental consequences of targets’ perceived negative workplace gossip spur their emotions and behaviors. Grounding on conservation of resources and ego depletion theories, this study aims to investigate why and how targets’ negative workplace gossip may contribute to trigger knowledge hiding. Specifically, the authors explore the underlying mechanism of personal ego depletion and boundary conditions of organizational justice to shed new light on the above process.

Design/methodology/approach

Using two time-wave survey, the authors collected 340 sample data from employees working in high-tech companies of China. Hierarchical regression analysis was used to examine hypothesized relationships of moderated mediation model.

Findings

The empirical results revealed that negative workplace gossip exacerbates knowledge hiding by increasing personal ego depletion. Furthermore, through testing moderated mediation model, the results showed that organizational justice (i.e. distributive and procedural justice) with the low presence moderates the stronger strength of the linkage between negative workplace gossip and personal ego depletion, and likewise, it also moderates the stronger effect of negative workplace gossip on knowledge hiding via personal ego depletion.

Practical implications

This study recommends several guidelines for managers and practitioners to mitigate negative gossip by strengthening organizational justice.

Originality/value

This study first enriches novel understanding in the literature between negative workplace gossip and knowledge hiding by using a new emotional mechanism (i.e. personal ego depletion). This research also contributes new insights by incorporating contextual boundary conditions (i.e. organizational justice) that have not been yet researched on negative gossip and knowledge hiding linkage.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 24 August 2022

Cherine Jneid

Software industry, one of the most knowledge-intensive industries, in Brazil has increased opportunities of evolution. Its competitive advantage relies on the efficiency…

Abstract

Purpose

Software industry, one of the most knowledge-intensive industries, in Brazil has increased opportunities of evolution. Its competitive advantage relies on the efficiency of the organizational knowledge management, but the knowledge hiding, its antecedents and moderators are still understudied. This study seeks to identify a new antecedent to knowledge hiding, such the occupational stress.

Design/methodology/approach

The author focused on the moderating effect of social self-efficacy and emotional self-efficacy in the relationship between occupational stress and knowledge hiding in software industry in Brazil. The author collected data from 189 software industry Brazilian employees in 30 firms using a time-lagged research design.

Findings

This study demonstrated that employees with high levels of social self-efficacy (SSE) and emotional self-efficacy (ESE) or both have more tendency to engage on knowledge hiding behavior comparing to their colleagues with low SSE and ESE. This study showed that SSE and ESE related positively to rationalized hiding, evasive hiding and playing dumb.

Originality/value

The author’s main contribution relies on the finding related to the joint role of social self-efficacy and emotional self-efficacy on engaging employees under occupational stress conditions in knowledge hiding behaviors.

Details

Evidence-based HRM: a Global Forum for Empirical Scholarship, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-3983

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 July 2022

Muhammad Waseem Bari, Qurrahtulain Khan and Asad Waqas

This paper aims to investigate the direct relationship between person-related workplace bullying and dimensions of knowledge hiding. In addition, this study also intends…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the direct relationship between person-related workplace bullying and dimensions of knowledge hiding. In addition, this study also intends to explore how relational psychological contract breach (RPCB) mediates bulling and knowledge hiding.

Design/methodology/approach

This study has used a survey-based research design to collect the data. The data were collected in three-time lags from 494 individuals working in IT-based firms (software houses) located in Pakistan. The data were analyzed through the variance-based structural equation modeling technique. For this purpose, the authors used SmartPLS3 software.

Findings

This study revealed that person-related workplace bullying impacts playing dumb and evasive knowledge hiding both directly and indirectly. In addition to this, person-related bullying does not affect rationalized knowledge hiding. This study also found that RPCB mediates the relationship between person-related bullying and knowledge hiding dimensions.

Practical implications

This study offers important implications for IT firms, including software houses. The findings imply that organizations should discourage person-related workplace bullying to reduce employees’ intention to engage in knowledge-hiding behavior. Moreover, the management of these firms should develop a culture of interpersonal trust among employees so that they can care for the relational psychological contract.

Originality/value

This study is amongst the few types of research that has investigated the impact of person-related bullying on different forms of knowledge hiding behavior through the mediating role of RPCB.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

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