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Article
Publication date: 29 April 2020

Sara Altaf, Muhammad Zahid Iqbal, Jan-Willem van Prooijen and Malik Ikramullah

This study seeks to examine the links between employee agreeableness, group performance, and peers' perceptions of threat of retaliation, through relationship conflict.

Abstract

Purpose

This study seeks to examine the links between employee agreeableness, group performance, and peers' perceptions of threat of retaliation, through relationship conflict.

Design/methodology/approach

In a laboratory setting, 42 groups of undergraduate students (N = 182) from a Pakistani university were assigned to group projects to be completed within four months. Data collected from three different questionnaires at four different times and actual scores awarded by the course instructor to each group were used for the analyses. Based on rWG(J) and ICC(1), level 1 (182 students') data were aggregated to level 2 (groups), and then analysed using regression analysis followed by Preacher and Hayes' bootstrapping procedure.

Findings

Results suggest that high agreeableness predicts group performance positively and peers' perceptions of threat of retaliation negatively. Moreover, relationship conflict among group members significantly mediates the agreeableness-group performance relationship. The above relationships may be sensitive to national culture.

Research limitations/implications

In this study, groups were formed for a few months, whereas in real organizational life, workgroups are formed for different durations. Therefore, the range of situations to which these findings generalize remains an open question.

Practical implications

Agreeableness of group members can be constructive for performance of the group. Managers may utilize this insight while forming groups, and rating performance.

Originality/value

There is dearth of research illuminating how employee's personality traits affect group performance and appraisal ratings. The study tests the effects of employee agreeableness on: (1) group performance, as rated by supervisors; (2) the threat of retaliation, as perceived by peer raters; and (3) the mediating effect of relationship conflict.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. 70 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

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Article
Publication date: 19 May 2020

Hana Medler-Liraz

Although studies have emphasized the need to explore the negative consequences of customer incivility, scant attention has been paid to positive factors that can mitigate…

Abstract

Purpose

Although studies have emphasized the need to explore the negative consequences of customer incivility, scant attention has been paid to positive factors that can mitigate its negative effects on employees’ service performance. The purpose of this study is to extend research on customer incivility and its association with rapport and tipping through the prism of conservation of resources theory. It also examines the role of agreeableness as a personal resource in coping with instances of incivility.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 502 Israeli restaurant servers took part in this study.

Findings

Agreeableness significantly moderated the relationship between customer incivility and rapport: agreeable hospitality employees who served customers manifesting low/medium incivility reported better rapport than disagreeable hospitality employees. However, this effect was not significant for high incivility. Further, agreeable hospitality employees who served customers with low/medium incivility reported higher tips than disagreeable hospitality employees. Surprisingly, the findings also suggested that when employees served customers exhibiting high incivility, the tips were lower for servers high on agreeableness than for servers low on agreeableness.

Originality/value

This study broadens the frontiers of research on customer incivility and provides insights into the critical financial and emotional costs hospitality employees and service organizations incur when encountering incivility. The findings also contribute to the scant research on the potential moderators that may enable employees to handle customer interactions more constructively in the case of incivility within the hospitality industry. Agreeableness appeared to alleviate the negative effects of customer incivility on rapport and tipping but only seemed to be an effective resource up to a certain level of customer incivility.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 34 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

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Article
Publication date: 20 June 2016

Lorna Doucet, Bo Shao, Lu Wang and Greg R. Oldham

Previous research has demonstrated the importance of emotion recognition ability in negotiations and leadership, but scant research has investigated the role of emotion…

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1397

Abstract

Purpose

Previous research has demonstrated the importance of emotion recognition ability in negotiations and leadership, but scant research has investigated the role of emotion recognition ability in service contexts. The purpose of this paper is to propose and test a compensatory model in which service employees’ emotion recognition ability helps enhance their job performance, particularly when employees score low on the agreeableness personality dimension or have low cognitive ability.

Design/methodology/approach

With a two-wave multisource dataset collected from a service center of a large retail bank, multiple regression analysis was used to test the moderating roles of agreeableness and cognitive ability on the relationship between service employees’ emotion recognition ability and their performance.

Findings

Service employees’ emotion recognition ability helped enhance their job performance. However, the positive effect of emotion recognition ability on job performance was only statistically significant when employees’ agreeableness or cognitive ability was low.

Practical implications

The findings have important implications for how service organizations select and recruit employees. In particular, service employees with low agreeableness or cognitive ability may still be able to perform well when possessing high emotion recognition ability. Therefore, emotion recognition ability should be considered in the selection and recruitment process.

Originality/value

Going beyond self-report measures of emotion recognition and using a performance measure from organizational records, this study is one of the first to examine how emotion recognition ability interacts with personality and cognitive ability in predicting service employees’ effectiveness in a service organization.

Details

Journal of Service Management, vol. 27 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-5818

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Article
Publication date: 13 June 2016

Zeeshan Riaz and Muhammad Ishfaq Khan

The purpose of this paper is to examine the asymmetric impact of service failure severity and agreeableness on consumer switchover intention with the mediating role of…

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1336

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the asymmetric impact of service failure severity and agreeableness on consumer switchover intention with the mediating role of consumer forgiveness in the aftermath of service failure.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 364 university students were given a hypothetical service failure situation and their response was collected through a standardized questionnaire. Multiple regression and Preacher and Hayes (2004) mediation analysis tests were conducted to analyze data.

Findings

The findings reveal that service failure severity has a direct positive impact on switchover intention and it also has an indirect impact on switchover intention through consumer forgiveness which it tends to weaken. On the other side, agreeableness has a direct negative impact on switchover intention, and it inhibits switchover intention indirectly too by stimulating forgiveness.

Research limitations/implications

A cross-sectional study involving convenience sampling has been conducted through self-report measures. Generalization of the research findings shall therefore be done with caution.

Practical implications

Severity of failure hampers forgiveness and therefore service managers should check factors that may challenge the tolerance level of consumers. While gauging satisfaction in post failure scenario, it is equally important to gauge consumer forgiveness.

Originality/value

This study is among the initial endeavors to explore forgiveness in service failures context. Also it is the first validation of a direct positive relationship between agreeableness and forgiveness in a South Asian country.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 28 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

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Article
Publication date: 12 December 2019

Srikanth P.B.

More than a decade of research on abusive leader behaviors suggests a consensus regarding its deleterious effects on employees’ contextual performance. Therefore, research…

Abstract

Purpose

More than a decade of research on abusive leader behaviors suggests a consensus regarding its deleterious effects on employees’ contextual performance. Therefore, research on how to cope with abusive leader behaviors is both theoretically and practically important. The purpose of this paper is to examine how individuals’ personality and appropriate coping strategy may jointly help in weakening the negative effects of abusive leader behaviors.

Design/methodology/approach

The study examines the relationship between social support coping strategy and agreeableness. Data collected from full-time employees and their reporting managers were used for analyses. Data were analyzed using moderated regression techniques followed by conditional indirect effects testing.

Findings

The study provides supports to the evidence that the relationship between abusive leader behaviors and contextual performance was weaker for employees high in agreeableness. Additionally, the use of social support coping strategy facilitated a negative relationship between abusive leader behaviors and contextual performance. Finally, the moderating effects of agreeableness were mediated by the use of social support coping strategy.

Research limitations/implications

The study contributes to theories of abusive supervision, personality and coping strategies. The results offer insights into the joint roles of personality and the social support coping strategy that may weaken the negative influence of abusive leader behaviors and contextual performance.

Practical implications

Human resource practitioners may benefit from formally institutionalizing social support through mentoring programs and informally through “buddy” programs for newly joined employees, to understand the organization culture and voice their concerns.

Originality/value

While most studies on abusive leader behavior focused on the deleterious effects, this study is one of the few that explores the role of coping strategy while dealing with abusive leader.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 49 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 22 February 2021

In-Jo Park, Peter B. Kim, Shenayang Hai and Xiaomin Zhang

This study aims to investigate the impact of service employees’ agreeableness personality and daily self-esteem on their daily interpersonal behaviors in terms of…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the impact of service employees’ agreeableness personality and daily self-esteem on their daily interpersonal behaviors in terms of interpersonal harmony and counterproductive work behavior toward other individuals (CWB-I). Furthermore, this study examines whether the impact of daily self-esteem on daily interpersonal behaviors is moderated by the quality of service employees’ relationship with their manager and leader–member exchange (LMX).

Design/methodology/approach

Using a sample of 111 restaurant employees in China who took daily surveys with 1,412 ratings for 10 consecutive days, a longitudinal analysis was conducted to test the research hypotheses using hierarchical linear modeling.

Findings

The results show that agreeableness personality predicted daily interpersonal harmony but had no significant effect on daily CWB-I. It was also found that daily self-esteem predicted both daily interpersonal harmony and daily CWB-I, and LMX moderated the effect of daily self-esteem on daily interpersonal behaviors.

Practical implications

Given the fluctuation of employees’ interpersonal behaviors, organizations should guide the variability of interpersonal behaviors in the positive direction. To promote daily interpersonal harmony and reduce daily CWB-I, managers could focus on recruiting employees with agreeableness, offering daily self-esteem training and enhancing the quality of LMX.

Originality/value

This research is unique in its objectives to examine what influences service employees’ interpersonal behaviors on a daily basis and its methods to implement a longitudinal approach unlike previous studies that often relied on cross-sectional designs to enhance the ecological validity of the findings.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 33 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 5 June 2017

Muhammad Farrukh, Chong Wei Ying and Shaheen Mansori

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the impact of five-factor model of personality on organizational commitment in the higher educational institutes of Pakistan.

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11354

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the impact of five-factor model of personality on organizational commitment in the higher educational institutes of Pakistan.

Design/methodology/approach

Quantitative methodology was adopted to measure the impact of personality on organizational commitment. A structured questionnaire was e-mailed to the faculty members of the social science department of higher education institutes. SmartPLS software was used to run the structural equation modeling technique.

Findings

The findings showed that extroversion, agreeableness, and conscientiousness are positively linked to affective commitment (AC), and neuroticism and openness has negative association with AC. Furthermore, extroversion and agreeableness were found to be negatively linked to continuance commitment. A negative link between neuroticism and continuance commitment while no relationship between conscientiousness, openness, and continuance commitment was found.

Research limitations/implications

Results have several implications for the personality and commitment literature. First, study provided comprehensive empirical evidence regarding the dispositional basis of organizational commitment notably; the authors found that the Big Five personality traits as a whole are significantly associated with organizational commitment. Second, the current findings underscore the role of agreeableness in shaping organizational commitment. Agreeableness was the strongest predictor of both AC and continuance commitment. Agreeableness may be especially relevant for predicting employee outcomes that are reliant on strong interpersonal or social exchange relationships. As such outcomes are becoming more and more critical in employee, group, and organizational effectiveness.

Originality/value

In general, findings show that Big Five traits play an important role in understanding employee commitment to the organization. Consistent with previous studies on personality traits in the workplace, practitioners will benefit from considering all of the Big Five traits in their selection systems.

Details

Journal of Work-Applied Management, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2205-2062

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2018

Oluyinka Ojedokun

The joint influence of personality traits, age and gender on environmental citizenship behavior (ECB) is relatively unknown among youth. Therefore, the purpose of this…

Abstract

Purpose

The joint influence of personality traits, age and gender on environmental citizenship behavior (ECB) is relatively unknown among youth. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to investigate the independent and joint influence of the Big Five traits, age and gender on the three dimensions of ECB of students in a Nigerian university community.

Design/methodology/approach

A quantitative cross-sectional survey was adopted to collect data from 290 students in a Nigerian university.

Findings

The findings show that personality traits of openness and agreeableness were more related with eco-initiatives and eco-helping. Likewise, traits of openness, conscientiousness, extraversion and agreeableness were more associated with eco-civic engagement. Age was also consistently associated with the three dimensions. The Big Five traits, age and gender also have joint influence on the dimensions of ECB.

Research limitations/implications

This is a self-reported survey, which limits the ability to draw any firm conclusions regarding the causal relationship between the study variables. Future research needs to consider other methods suitable for establishing causal relationship.

Practical implications

The findings imply that knowing the associations of personality traits, age and gender with environmental actions can help organizers of environmental initiatives to target their recruitment messages toward youth who might be pre-disposed to taking environmental actions, and also consider alternative actions that might appeal to their counterparts.

Originality/value

The originality of this paper lies in combining personality traits, age and gender to gain a better understanding of the three dimensions of ECB in a student sample against monolithic approach of authors of previous studies.

Details

Management of Environmental Quality: An International Journal, vol. 29 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7835

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Article
Publication date: 9 January 2017

Candy Mei Fung Tang and Desmond Lam

This paper aims to examine the role of extraversion and agreeableness personality traits on Generation Y (Gen Y) consumers’ attitudes toward and willingness to pay for…

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2607

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the role of extraversion and agreeableness personality traits on Generation Y (Gen Y) consumers’ attitudes toward and willingness to pay for green hotels. Gen Y is a large and influential generational group, with a significant interest in green issues. There has been a lack of research on the consumer decision-making process toward green hotels. Specifically, the impact of personality on green attitudes and behavioral intentions is rarely investigated.

Design/methodology/approach

A major survey consisting of 406 final respondents was conducted. The 29-item survey questionnaire comprises items for extraversion, agreeableness, attitudes toward green hotels and behavioral intention toward green hotels. Numerous statistical techniques, including structural equation modeling, were used to evaluate the data collected.

Findings

The results show that extraversion and agreeableness personality traits are positively associated with respondents’ attitudes toward green hotels. Stronger and more positive attitudes toward green hotels lead to greater willingness to pay for green hotels. Moreover, attitudes toward green hotels mediate the relationship between the two personality traits and willingness to pay. These findings of Gen Y subsegments can be useful to hotel managers in identifying who are more likely to stay in and pay for environmentally friendly hotels.

Originality/value

Gen Ys are an influential consumer age group in the service industry, and their general attitudes toward “green” products are important to modern hoteliers. However, few researchers have examined Gen Ys’ attitudes and behavioral intentions toward green issues. No research has examined the role of personality traits on consumers’ perceptions of green hotels. The present study found that the extraversion and agreeableness traits of Gen Y individuals are linked to their attitudes toward and willingness to pay for green hotels.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 29 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 9 October 2019

Doo Hun Lim, Seung Won Yoon, Jeeyon Paek and Yuri Choi

This study aims to examine a structural relationship among agreeableness, similarity in agreeableness, positive affect and transfer of informal learning. Also, it…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine a structural relationship among agreeableness, similarity in agreeableness, positive affect and transfer of informal learning. Also, it investigates the mediating role of motivation.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected by a survey via snowball sampling. In total, 742 respondents at 72 companies from multiple industries in South Korea participated. The authors performed exploratory confirmatory factor analyses and structural equation modeling to test the research model and hypotheses.

Findings

The results showed that agreeableness made a dual impact as a personal and a relational trait enhancing the employee’s positive affect, and motivation to learn fully mediated the relationship between agreeableness and transfer of informal learning. This supports that prosocial personality traits enhance the employee’s motivation, learning and learning application. The full mediation of motivation to learn between positive affect and informal learning transfer emphasizes the importance of intentionality on the part of employees in informal learning contexts.

Originality/value

Organizational research pays little attention to social perspectives of informal learning (Varela et al., 2011). The results highlight that workplace informal learning is a socio-psychological process; thus, examining social and psychological factors together would be beneficial.

Details

European Journal of Training and Development, vol. 44 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

Keywords

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