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Abstract

Details

The Emerald Review of Industrial and Organizational Psychology
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-786-9

Book part
Publication date: 8 April 2004

Elizabeth Mannix and Karen A Jehn

Early efforts in the study of groups had an inherently temporal dimension, notably work on group dynamics and the related study of phases in group problem solving. Not…

Abstract

Early efforts in the study of groups had an inherently temporal dimension, notably work on group dynamics and the related study of phases in group problem solving. Not surprisingly, the majority of work linking time to groups has focused on team development. By contrast, work on team performance has tended to take the form Input-Process-Output, in which the passage of time is implied. There is rarely a discussion of how processes might be affected by timing. We suggest ways in which the two literatures might be brought together. We review models of group development and group performance, propose ways in which temporal issues can be integrated into performance models, and conclude by raising questions for future theory and empirical investigation.

Details

Time in Groups
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-093-7

Book part
Publication date: 13 December 2004

Clement C. Chen and Keith T. Jones

Prior experimental budgeting research has focused primarily on individuals’ budget setting and little experimental research has examined budgeting in a group setting…

Abstract

Prior experimental budgeting research has focused primarily on individuals’ budget setting and little experimental research has examined budgeting in a group setting. Using a controlled experiment, this study extends prior participative budgeting research by examining the effects of aggregation levels of performance feedback and task interdependence on budgetary slack and the effects of different levels of feedback on group performance in a group participative budget setting.

The results suggest that aggregation levels of performance feedback differentially impact budgetary slack and group performance. Providing both group and individual performance feedback increases group performance and reduces budgetary slack compared to providing group performance feedback only. Providing information about other subordinates’ performance further increases group performance and reduces budgetary slack beyond the effects of providing individual workers information only about their own performance. The results indicate that task interdependence also affects the level of budgetary slack. Specifically, high task interdependence groups created more budgetary slack than did low task interdependence groups.

Details

Advances in Management Accounting
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-139-2

Book part
Publication date: 19 July 2005

Mark Shanley and Margaret Peteraf

Research on strategic industry groups provides numerous examples of the tensions between theory and methodology in strategic management research. After an initial…

Abstract

Research on strategic industry groups provides numerous examples of the tensions between theory and methodology in strategic management research. After an initial explosion of largely non-theoretical, methods-driven studies led to mounting criticisms, researchers recognized the need for more theoretical guidance concerning the nature of groups and their potential influences on firm performance. This refocusing on theory has produced different research streams, each with its own methodological concerns. This chapter reviews these developments with the objective of understanding how researchers balance theory and methods in current research.

Details

Research Methodology in Strategy and Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-208-5

Book part
Publication date: 1 July 2014

Samantha A. Conroy, Nina Gupta, Jason D. Shaw and Tae-Youn Park

In this paper, we review the literature on pay variation (e.g., pay dispersion, pay compression, pay range) in organizations. Pay variation research has increased markedly…

Abstract

In this paper, we review the literature on pay variation (e.g., pay dispersion, pay compression, pay range) in organizations. Pay variation research has increased markedly in the past two decades and much progress has been made in terms of understanding its consequences for individual, team, and organizational outcomes. Our review of this research exposes several levels-related assumptions that have limited theoretical and empirical progress. We isolate the issues that deserve attention, develop an illustrative multilevel model, and offer a number of testable propositions to guide future research on pay structures.

Details

Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-824-2

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 8 April 2004

Steven J Karau and Janice R Kelly

Despite the potentially vital implications of time pressure for group performance in general and team effectiveness in particular, research has traditionally neglected the…

Abstract

Despite the potentially vital implications of time pressure for group performance in general and team effectiveness in particular, research has traditionally neglected the study of time limits and group effectiveness. We examine the small, but growing, body of research addressing the effect of time pressure on group performance and introduce our Attentional Focus Model of group effectiveness (Karau & Kelly, 1992). We examine recent research on the utility of the model and identify selected implications of the model for how time pressure may interact with other factors such as task type, group structure, and personality to influence team performance. Finally, we discuss methodological issues of studying attention, interaction processes, and team performance.

Details

Time in Groups
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-093-7

Book part
Publication date: 16 August 2007

Stéphane Côté

This chapter examines how emotional intelligence may influence the performance of groups. I first address relevant issues concerning emotional intelligence at the…

Abstract

This chapter examines how emotional intelligence may influence the performance of groups. I first address relevant issues concerning emotional intelligence at the individual level of analysis. I then describe the range of composition models by which group emotional intelligence constructs can be created, from the emotional intelligence of the members of the group, articulate mechanisms by which each construct may be related to performance, and use Steiner's (1972) typology of group tasks to identify when each construct may best predict performance. I also use the mechanisms of multiplication and compensation to consider how group emotional intelligence may combine with other group constructs to predict performance. I end this chapter with a discussion of research implications.

Details

Affect and Groups
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7623-1413-3

Article
Publication date: 3 August 2021

Wen Wu, Dan Ni, Shaoxue Wu, Lu Lu, Xijing Zhang and Shengyue Hao

The extant literature mainly focuses on the antecedents and outcomes of envy at the individual level. Workgroups have become ideal units for research on envy given the…

Abstract

Purpose

The extant literature mainly focuses on the antecedents and outcomes of envy at the individual level. Workgroups have become ideal units for research on envy given the ubiquitous teamwork in organizations. This study aims to examine whether, how and when envy climate can influence group performance.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors analyzed data collected in three waves from a sample of 72 groups with 475 team members in full-service hotels in China.

Findings

Envy climate was negatively associated with group performance via intragroup relationship conflict. Furthermore, competitive climate moderated the effect of envy climate on intragroup relationship conflict and the indirect effect of envy climate on group performance through intragroup relationship conflict.

Practical implications

The present research offers organizations valuable insights into how to minimize the climate of envy and competition within a group and relieve the relationship conflict that may damage group performance.

Originality/value

Drawing on a social functional perspective of emotions, this study enriches the envy research by conceptualizing envy climate as a collective perception and clarifying its effect on group performance. The authors extend the understanding of envy climate by showing how a climate of envy embedded in a group influences group performance and also explain when group members may be more likely to act in a destructive way to respond to such a climate.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 33 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 October 2020

Vera Hagemann, Greta Ontrup and Annette Kluge

This paper aims to explore the influence of collective orientation (CO) on coordination and team performance for interdependently working teams while controlling for…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the influence of collective orientation (CO) on coordination and team performance for interdependently working teams while controlling for person-related and team variables.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 58 two-person-teams participated in a simulation-based firefighting task. The laboratory study took 2 h for each team. The effects of CO in tasks of increasing complexity were investigated under the consideration of control variables, and the relations between CO, coordination and team performance were assessed using a multivariate latent growth curve modeling approach and by estimating indirect effects in simple mediation models.

Findings

Team members high on CO performed significantly better than low-scoring members. The effect of CO on team performance was independent from an increasing task complexity, whereas the effect of CO on coordination was not. The effect of CO on team performance was mediated by coordination within the team, and the positive relation between CO and performance persists when including group efficacy into the model.

Research limitations/implications

As CO is a modifiable person-related variable and important for effective team processes, additional research on factors influencing this attitude during work is assumed to be valuable.

Practical implications

CO is especially important for highly interdependently working teams in high-risk-organizations such as the fire service or nuclear power plants, where errors lead to severe consequences for human beings or the environment.

Originality/value

No other studies showed the importance of CO for coordination and team performance while considering teamwork-relevant variables and the interdependence of work.

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 27 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 March 2020

Manish Gupta and Arnold B. Bakker

The objective of this study is to understand the mediating role of student engagement between future time perspective and group task performance. In addition, the study…

Abstract

Purpose

The objective of this study is to understand the mediating role of student engagement between future time perspective and group task performance. In addition, the study examines the interaction effect of group cohesion task with student engagement on group performance.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 170 (a total of 34 groups of five members each) business management students for three consecutive months. To analyze the data, multi-level modeling was carried out.

Findings

The results of the three-wave multi-level analysis indicate support for the hypotheses and suggest that future time perspective affects group performance through student engagement. Moreover, group cohesion interacts with student engagement to predict group task performance.

Research limitations/implications

The findings show how the application of engagement theory can help in understanding the relationship between two distant variables, namely, future time perspective and group performance.

Practical implications

The educators are encouraged to engage students for facilitating the positive impact of future time perspective on group task performance. The findings also imply that the students with future orientation perform well and thus, the educators may need to teach students to have futuristic perspective.

Originality/value

This study in one of its kinds to test the mediating role of student engagement between future time perspective and group task performance as well as the interaction effect of group cohesion task with student engagement on group performance at both the individual and group level over a period of time.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. 12 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 187000