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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2005

Norm Medeiros

This article discusses the impact of electronic resources on the suite of services provided by serials agents.

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Abstract

Purpose

This article discusses the impact of electronic resources on the suite of services provided by serials agents.

Design/methodology/approach

The article describes the changing needs of academic libraries in this new environment, and the ways in which serials agents can repurpose themselves to remain a corner‐stone of serials management. A white paper by R2 Consulting is referenced for its insights into the expectations and requirements of academic libraries. Brief statements by two Otto Harrassowitz executives are included.

Findings

If agents are to take on these new responsibilities for e‐journals, libraries must expect to pay something beyond typical service fees. Many cash‐strapped libraries will find it difficult to pay higher fees to agents than they do presently, even for services that could save hundreds of hours per year in staff time. Consortia‐purchased collections and the proclivities of a handful of large publishers aside, it will no doubt become necessary for libraries to entrust all subscriptions to agents as the majority of subscriptions maintained by libraries migrate from print to electronic.

Originality/value

Outlines a role for serials agents in the new digital information world.

Details

OCLC Systems & Services: International digital library perspectives, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1065-075X

Keywords

Case study
Publication date: 20 January 2017

Sarit Markovich and Charlotte Snyder

The Kenyan government’s announcement of a new 10 percent tax in March 2013 threatened the future prospects of M-Pesa, Safaricom’s mobile money transfer service, which had…

Abstract

The Kenyan government’s announcement of a new 10 percent tax in March 2013 threatened the future prospects of M-Pesa, Safaricom’s mobile money transfer service, which had revolutionized the way money moved in Kenya. The new tax would be levied on all cash transfers but was largely targeted at M-Pesa, which controlled around 80 percent of the cash transfer market. In response to the new tax, Safaricom, the mobile communications market leader, announced a 10 percent price increase.

The case presents the structure Safaricom established in order to develop a mobile money transfer service in Kenya. As a concept, M-Pesa was unprecedented in Kenya: prospective customers had to get comfortable with the idea that a mobile communications company could provide a payment system, that transactions could be initiated through a mobile phone, and that nonbank outlets could provide cash-in/cash-out services. Even when the concept was accepted, however, customers needed a convenient network of agents to handle transactions, and stores needed to see demand from customers in order to be motivated to become agent outlets. Thus, in order to grow, M-Pesa needed to aggressively pursue and acquire both customers and agents in this two-sided market.

  • Understand the complexity of pricing in two-sided markets

  • Evaluate the profitability of different pricing strategies in two-sided markets

  • Understand the effect of an innovation on the creation and capture of value

  • Identify possible threats to competitive advantage in two-sided markets as well as in developing countries

  • Understand the value of co-opetition and how cooperation with competitors and complementors can increase a company’s profitability

Understand the complexity of pricing in two-sided markets

Evaluate the profitability of different pricing strategies in two-sided markets

Understand the effect of an innovation on the creation and capture of value

Identify possible threats to competitive advantage in two-sided markets as well as in developing countries

Understand the value of co-opetition and how cooperation with competitors and complementors can increase a company’s profitability

Details

Kellogg School of Management Cases, vol. no.
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2474-6568
Published by: Kellogg School of Management

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 April 2015

Mary Ann Stamsø

The purpose of this paper is to examine the widespread of property sellers choosing to sell by themselves or through an estate agent, what characterises them and the…

1041

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the widespread of property sellers choosing to sell by themselves or through an estate agent, what characterises them and the reason for their choice. In addition the paper contains comparisons of the gap between sales price and asking price between the sales methods and satisfaction with the sales process. This study is the first study of these phenomena carried out in Norway.

Design/methodology/approach

The data used for this study was obtained from a national survey including 1,649 house sellers. A logistic regression analysis is used to analyse the impact of household’s characteristics on the sales method.

Findings

The main findings of this study are that 83 per cent of the house sellers used an estate agent through the whole sales process and differences in the choices are related to urbanisation, age and education. The most important reason for preferring a real estate broker is that doing the sale on your own is considered too much work. Conversely, the most important reason for doing the sale on your own is that estate agents are too expensive. Those selling without an estate agent were more satisfied and the gap between sales price and asking price was smaller than for those selling through a real estate broker.

Originality/value

Issues concerning competition within the market for estate agents should be central topics for property management. Property sellers selling their property by themselves are an important contribution to increase the competition in the market for estate agents. This issue has not been on the agenda in Norway, or in Europe, in the same way as in the USA. This is probably due to the complexity in the legislation and strict laws within property sales in Central and Southern Europe. However, in Norway, UK and in the Nordic countries, the legal system is not complicated. It is rather the lockout of private individuals from the housing web sites and the fact that the property sellers are not familiar with this kind of transaction that has prevented property sellers to sell their house by themselves. Today Norway is one of few countries with a booming housing market, which also has increased the commission for estate agents. From 2010 private individuals got access to advertise their house on the housing web sites in Norway. These have influenced the focus on alternative sales methods.

Details

Property Management, vol. 33 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7472

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 1999

Rocco R. Vanasco

The Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA) of 1977 and its amendment – the Trade and Competitive Act of 1988 – are unique not only in the history of the accounting and…

9319

Abstract

The Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA) of 1977 and its amendment – the Trade and Competitive Act of 1988 – are unique not only in the history of the accounting and auditing profession, but also in international law. The Acts raised awareness of the need for efficient and adequate internal control systems to prevent illegal acts such as the bribery of foreign officials, political parties and governments to secure or maintain contracts overseas. Its uniqueness is also due to the fact that the USA is the first country to pioneer such a legislation that impacted foreign trade, international law and codes of ethics. The research traces the history of the FCPA before and after its enactment, the role played by the various branches of the United States Government – Congress, Department of Justice, Securities Exchange commission (SEC), Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) and the Internal Revenue Service (IRS); the contributions made by professional associations such as the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants (AICFA), the Institute of Internal Auditors (IIA), the American Bar Association (ABA); and, finally, the role played by various international organizations such as the United Nations (UN), the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), the World Trade Organization (WTO) and the International Federation of Accountants (IFAC). A cultural, ethical and legalistic background will give a better understanding of the FCPA as wll as the rationale for its controversy.

Details

Managerial Auditing Journal, vol. 14 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-6902

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2021

Gracia Rubio Martín, Conrado Miguel Manuel García, Ángel Rodríguez-López and Francisco José Gonzalez Sanchez

This research proposes analytical valuation models throughout football players' life cycles based on crowd valuations from social media to produce dynamic sporting human…

Abstract

Purpose

This research proposes analytical valuation models throughout football players' life cycles based on crowd valuations from social media to produce dynamic sporting human capital disclosures, and therefore, supplying further useful information to capture the intellectual capital (IC) of football clubs.

Design/methodology/approach

This work is carried out using an econometric model that includes 658 observations of crowd judgments versus their transfer fees, for the best footballers of the three major European Leagues between 2006 and 2018. To make the model more parsimonious, the set of independent variables that really add value has been found across the stepwise methodology.

Findings

The significant differences between both models are analyzed, integrating previous academic literature based on the existence of negotiation elements in prices, and in the capacity of crowdsourcing to explain assessments of football players, from a dynamic perspective, alongside a new variable: injuries, which has not been explained before.

Originality/value

The broader assessments from crowdsourcing should be integrated in intellectual capital disclosures (ICD), from a critical, novel and dynamic perspective, creating a virtuous cycle between managers and fans, to increase transparency of financial information for stakeholders and society.

Details

Journal of Intellectual Capital, vol. 23 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1469-1930

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 April 2008

Amr A.G. Hassanein and Mohamed M.G. El‐Barkouky

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the current mortgage system in Egypt.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the current mortgage system in Egypt.

Design/methodology/approach

The institutional and regulatory structures of two international mortgage systems, namely: the USA and the Malaysian were examined through an extensive literature survey. On the other hand, data on the Egyptian mortgage system were collected, analyzed, then compared to both practices.

Findings

The results identified several limitations in the Egyptian mortgage practice such as: inefficient procedures of property registration; absence of an efficient mortgage secondary market; relatively high‐mortgage lending rates; non‐existence of various types of mortgage instruments and lack of credit enhancement tools.

Research limitations/implications

The study presented several recommendations for improving the existing mortgage practice, among which were: realizing a proper secondary market and lowering mortgage lending rates.

Practical implications

By 2002, a sharp decline was experienced in the sales of housing units due to the various credit restrictions adopted by banks, coupled with high‐interest rates in relatively short amortizing periods. Accordingly, home finance process was held up, as the purchasing power of low‐ and middle‐income homebuyers was not sufficient to buy homes with such provisions. This situation imposed the need for a long‐term housing financing mechanism that would directly retrieve the residential construction sector.

Originality/value

This research was innovative in the sense that it directed the Egyptian Government's attention to the existence of Cagamas in Malaysia and accordingly, the first liquidity facility company in Egypt was established in June 2006.

Details

International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8378

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 24 May 2011

Tajudeen Olalekan Yusuf

The purpose of this paper is to examine brokers' financial incentives in the Nigerian insurance market and how they balance conflict of interest which their role…

1092

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine brokers' financial incentives in the Nigerian insurance market and how they balance conflict of interest which their role engenders. The paper aims to assess how these affect the control of opportunism of customers in the Nigerian insurance market.

Design/methodology/approach

The study involved the use of semi‐structured interviews of insurance broking executives and documentary analyses of how incentives aid the control of opportunism in the insurance market.

Findings

Findings suggest that the Nigerian insurance market operates on highly tariff incentive system which might be hampering insurance brokers' role in bridging information asymmetries to control opportunism in the market. Conflicts of interest are also real in the insurance market.

Practical implications

Findings are relevant for practitioners and regulators in addressing the restrictive remuneration system which calls for liberalisation to encourage the control of opportunism in the insurance market.

Originality/value

The study underscores how financial incentives might be utilised to balance conflict of interest which insurance intermediation engenders.

Details

The Journal of Risk Finance, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1526-5943

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 July 2012

Sylwia Lindqvist

The purpose of this paper is to provide a theoretical framework for the subsequent analysis of the European Union internal market's concept of transparency in residential…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a theoretical framework for the subsequent analysis of the European Union internal market's concept of transparency in residential real estate transactions. Specifically, it seeks to identify the essential factors that should be addressed within any such analysis.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is based on a review of the literature on the general concept of transparency, and on other related aspects.

Findings

Based on this study, five dimensions of transparency are identified, namely transparency in transaction procedure, legal information, financing, taxation and transaction costs. The essential points are that an increase in cross‐border transactions increases demand for easy access to information held in other countries. The studied literature focuses on the coordination of legal systems, making systems more uniform and legally secured, and on broadening of the mortgage market. The study highlights the complexities involved in achieving transparency, as well as the length of time that this will take to achieve in practice.

Originality/value

The paper identifies different dimensions of transparency in residential real estate transactions. There is little prior research in the area which focuses specifically on residential transactions. The study therefore draws upon work in other areas, including financial markets and taxation, and places this within a residential housing context.

Details

International Journal of Law in the Built Environment, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-1450

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 May 1980

Recently, a major British company with headquarters in London succeeded after much effort in locating a senior and experienced international finance expert to become its…

Abstract

Recently, a major British company with headquarters in London succeeded after much effort in locating a senior and experienced international finance expert to become its new financial director. A good offer was made (£21,500), the pay and conditions looked right, the man wanted the job — but he had to refuse. One more company, and one more capable man, had become victims of a particularly invidious new constraint on effective business management — executive immobility. The cause? The man lived in an area of low price housing in the North of England. Any reasonable salary increase on moving down south would have left him worse off in real terms — simply due to the cost of moving and the increase in his mortgage to meet the London prices.

Details

Industrial Management, vol. 80 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-6929

Abstract

Details

The Savvy Investor's Guide to Building Wealth through Alternative Investments
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80117-135-9

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