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Article
Publication date: 3 May 2016

Liang Chen, Scott C. Ellis and Nallan Suresh

The purpose of this paper is to apply expectancy theory to advance a conceptual framework which identifies factors that motivate and affect the adoption of supplier…

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4124

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to apply expectancy theory to advance a conceptual framework which identifies factors that motivate and affect the adoption of supplier development (SD) activities.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conduct a comprehensive literature review to identify salient contributions and conceptual gaps within prior SD studies. These conceptual gaps motivate the use of expectancy theory and the broader management literature to develop a conceptual framework of SD adoption.

Findings

The study results in the development of a two-stage conceptual framework in which two behavioral constructs – SD expectancy and valence – play an important role in mediating the effects of activity-, firm-, interfirm-, and environment-level factors on the adoption of SD activities. Accordingly, the authors advance 11 testable propositions that underlie the logical development of the framework.

Research limitations/implications

The application of expectancy theory facilitates the integration of constructs culled from disparate theories into a cohesive conceptual framework. Highlighting the central role of motivational force, the conceptual development provides a behavioral explanation for the indirect effects of activity-, firm-, interfirm-, and environment-level factors on SD adoption.

Practical implications

The authors advance a set of factors associated with three successive stages of the SD planning process – partner selection, activity selection, and scope selection – that managers should consider when adopting a SD activity.

Originality/value

In contrast to prior research, which largely draws from economic or strategic theories, the authors employ a behavioral approach to advance a novel set of factors that influence SD adoption.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 36 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 20 July 2012

Reijo Savolainen

The purpose of this article is to elaborate the picture of the motivators for information seeking by comparing the conceptualizations of task‐based information needs and…

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4453

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to elaborate the picture of the motivators for information seeking by comparing the conceptualizations of task‐based information needs and expectancy‐value theories.

Design/methodology/approach

The article is a conceptual analysis of major articles characterising task‐based information needs and expectancy‐value theories developed in psychology since the 1950s.

Findings

The conceptualizations of task‐based information needs approach the motivators for information seeking in terms of the informational requirements posed by tasks at hand. However, the ways in which such needs trigger and drive information seeking have not been specified in detail. Expectancy‐value theories provide a more elaborate picture of motivational factors by focusing on actors' beliefs about the probability of success in information seeking and the perceived value of the outcome of this activity.

Research limitations/implications

The findings are based on the comparison of two research approaches only.

Originality/value

So far, information scientists have largely ignored the psychological theories of motivation. This study demonstrates the potential of such approaches by discussing an established psychological theory. The findings indicate that such theories hold a good potential to elaborate the models of task‐based information seeking in particular.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 68 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

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Book part
Publication date: 10 December 2015

Dekar Urumsah

The concept and practice of e-services has become essential in business transactions. Yet there are still many organizations that have not developed e-services optimally…

Abstract

The concept and practice of e-services has become essential in business transactions. Yet there are still many organizations that have not developed e-services optimally. This is especially relevant in the context of Indonesian Airline companies. Therefore, many airline customers in Indonesia are still in doubt about it, or even do not use it. To fill this gap, this study attempts to develop a model for e-services adoption and empirically examines the factors influencing the airlines customers in Indonesia in using e-services offered by the Indonesian airline companies. Taking six Indonesian airline companies as a case example, the study investigated the antecedents of e-services usage of Indonesian airlines. This study further examined the impacts of motivation on customers in using e-services in the Indonesian context. Another important aim of this study was to investigate how ages, experiences and geographical areas moderate effects of e-services usage.

The study adopts a positivist research paradigm with a two-phase sequential mixed method design involving qualitative and quantitative approaches. An initial research model was first developed based on an extensive literature review, by combining acceptance and use of information technology theories, expectancy theory and the inter-organizational system motivation models. A qualitative field study via semi-structured interviews was then conducted to explore the present state among 15 respondents. The results of the interviews were analysed using content analysis yielding the final model of e-services usage. Eighteen antecedent factors hypotheses and three moderating factors hypotheses and 52-item questionnaire were developed. A focus group discussion of five respondents and a pilot study of 59 respondents resulted in final version of the questionnaire.

In the second phase, the main survey was conducted nationally to collect the research data among Indonesian airline customers who had already used Indonesian airline e-services. A total of 819 valid questionnaires were obtained. The data was then analysed using a partial least square (PLS) based structural equation modelling (SEM) technique to produce the contributions of links in the e-services model (22% of all the variances in e-services usage, 37.8% in intention to use, 46.6% in motivation, 39.2% in outcome expectancy, and 37.7% in effort expectancy). Meanwhile, path coefficients and t-values demonstrated various different influences of antecedent factors towards e-services usage. Additionally, a multi-group analysis based on PLS is employed with mixed results. In the final findings, 14 hypotheses were supported and 7 hypotheses were not supported.

The major findings of this study have confirmed that motivation has the strongest contribution in e-services usage. In addition, motivation affects e-services usage both directly and indirectly through intention-to-use. This study provides contributions to the existing knowledge of e-services models, and practical applications of IT usage. Most importantly, an understanding of antecedents of e-services adoption will provide guidelines for stakeholders in developing better e-services and strategies in order to promote and encourage more customers to use e-services. Finally, the accomplishment of this study can be expanded through possible adaptations in other industries and other geographical contexts.

Details

E-services Adoption: Processes by Firms in Developing Nations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-709-7

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1989

Marcia Kassner and Bruce J. Eberhardt

What makes managers choose to continue taking classes and seminars to further their management development? In the past twenty years, motivated and behavioural theory has…

Abstract

What makes managers choose to continue taking classes and seminars to further their management development? In the past twenty years, motivated and behavioural theory has been applied to the career decision‐making process in management development. Two approaches, expectancy theory and, to a lesser extent, justification processes have been investigated. The major difference between the two approaches is that expectancy theory suggests that managers are primarily forward‐looking in their careers and management development, whereas justification takes the position that managers attempt to make present career behaviours consistent with past career actions.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 12 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2020

Jordon Swain, Kevin Kumlien and Andrew Bond

This paper aims to provide an experiential exercise for management and leadership educators to use in the course of their teaching duties.

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3441

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide an experiential exercise for management and leadership educators to use in the course of their teaching duties.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach of this classroom teaching method uses an experiential exercise to teach Adams’ equity theory and Vroom’s expectancy theory.

Findings

This experiential exercise has proven useful in teaching two major theories of motivation and is often cited as one of the more memorable classes students experience.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is an original experiential exercise for teaching the equity and expectancy theories of motivation.

Details

Organization Management Journal, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN:

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Book part
Publication date: 10 December 2005

Ken C. Snead, Wayne A. Johnson and Atieno A. Ndede-Amadi

Many studies, motivated by concerns for activity-based costing (ABC) implementation efforts being less than successful, have suggested that the lack of success in this…

Abstract

Many studies, motivated by concerns for activity-based costing (ABC) implementation efforts being less than successful, have suggested that the lack of success in this area stems more from behavioral, as opposed to technical, factors. This concern for the behavioral aspects of systems implementation has also emerged from much of the more general information systems research examining determinants of implementation success. Accordingly, the purpose of this study is to determine if a popular process theory of motivation, expectancy theory, would be useful in explaining the motivation of managers to incorporate ABC information into their job. Data obtained from two experiments employing a judgment modeling methodology support the relevance of both the valence and force models of expectancy theory in this context. Further, the judgments provided by the subject managers suggest they perceive improved product cost accuracy as the most beneficial outcome of ABC use, followed by an equivalent appreciation for both an enhanced ability to communicate the underlying economics of the firm and to identify non-value-added activities. Additionally, subject managers exhibited a greater concern for the possibility that obtaining the data to maintain the ABC system would be difficult and costly than they did for concerns that the ABC information would increase the level of complexity of the information that they use.

Details

Advances in Management Accounting
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-243-6

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Book part
Publication date: 25 November 2021

Stephen R. Getty, Kenneth E. Barron and Chris S. Hulleman

Social and emotional learning (SEL) is an important driver of student well-being, academic achievement, and future success. Despite decades of work on motivation theory

Abstract

Social and emotional learning (SEL) is an important driver of student well-being, academic achievement, and future success. Despite decades of work on motivation theory and frameworks to promote student motivation and achievement outcomes, connections between motivation and recent frameworks and measures of SEL could be stronger. The purpose of our chapter is to help address this shortcoming. First, we begin by reviewing which theories of motivation currently appear in major SEL frameworks. Second, we introduce how a more comprehensive theory of motivation (based on an expectancy–value–cost framework) could be incorporated into SEL frameworks to advance their overall impact. Third, using examples from our ongoing research in STEM classrooms, we show how a broader knowledge of motivation can inform practitioners on how to promote key SEL competencies and subsequent achievement and engagement for students, especially to address inequities for historically marginalized and minoritized students. Finally, we close with recommendations for future directions for research and practice.

Details

Motivating the SEL Field Forward Through Equity
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-464-6

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Article
Publication date: 29 March 2011

Daniel V. Holland

The purpose of this paper is to examine the use of expectancy and valence in the decision policies of entrepreneurs when choosing whether or not to persist with their…

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1644

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the use of expectancy and valence in the decision policies of entrepreneurs when choosing whether or not to persist with their current venture.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a conjoint experiment design, 105 entrepreneurs made a series of decisions based on a common set of attributes. The decisions were analyzed using hierarchical linear modeling to determine how the attributes were weighed in the decision policies.

Findings

The results indicate that entrepreneurs use expectancy and valences and interestingly, a negative interaction between expectancy and valences in their persistence decision policies.

Practical implications

An understanding of how individuals make decisions may be of great value to entrepreneurs as they consider the decision to persist with a venture in the face of adversity.

Originality/value

Previous research has focused on the decision to start a business. This study adds to the literature by considering the important decision of whether to persist with a business or not. The results provide interesting insights into why and how entrepreneurs choose to persist and contributes to the literature on expectancy theory.

Details

Management Research Review, vol. 34 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8269

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Article
Publication date: 13 January 2020

Luisa Helena Pinto, Carlos Cabral-Cardoso and William B. Werther Jr.

Under the framework of the achievement goal and expectancy-value theories, this study aims to examine which motivational goals lead people to self-initiate an…

Abstract

Purpose

Under the framework of the achievement goal and expectancy-value theories, this study aims to examine which motivational goals lead people to self-initiate an international assignment and predict subjective assignment achievements.

Design/methodology/approach

Data was collected from a convenience sample of 141 self-initiated expatriates (SIEs) from multiple locations. The first set of analyses tested the hypothesis that demographics and expectancies of competence in living and working abroad discriminate the individuals who initiate an international assignment for learning goals from the ones who value performance goals. The second set of analyses tested the hypothesis that individual expectancies and goals predict specific subjective assignment achievements and overall success.

Findings

The results show that SIEs who had greater confidence in their ability to live and work abroad were also more likely to move to pursuit performance goals. They also reported greater host adjustment and superior professional accomplishments, but not higher family achievements or success.

Originality/value

In contrast to the dominant descriptive approach to the study of SIEs, this study underpins the adequacy and potential of a motivational approach in predicting SIEs’ behaviors and outcomes. The theoretical and managerial implications for international business and cross-cultural management are further discussed.

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Book part
Publication date: 25 March 2019

Allan Wigfield and Jessica R. Gladstone

We discuss the development of achievement motivation from the perspective of Eccles and colleagues’ expectancy-value theory (EVT), focusing on the importance of children…

Abstract

We discuss the development of achievement motivation from the perspective of Eccles and colleagues’ expectancy-value theory (EVT), focusing on the importance of children developing positive expectancies for success and valuing of achievement to help them cope with change and uncertainty. Although research has shown that, overall, children’s expectancies and values decline, recent studies show many different trajectories in the overall pattern. Children’s expectancies and values predict their school performance and choices of which activities to pursue in and out of school, with these relations getting stronger as children get older. When children’s expectancies and values stay more positive, they can better cope with change and uncertainty, such as the increasing difficulty of many school subjects, or broader changes such as immigrating to a new country. Parents can buffer children’s experiences of change and uncertainty by encouraging them to engage in different activities and by providing them opportunities to do so. Parents’ positive beliefs about their children’s abilities and discussing with them the importance of school can moderate the observed decline in children’s ability beliefs and values. For immigrant and minority children, parents’ emphasis on the importance of school and encouragement of the development of a positive sense of their racial/ethnic identity are critical buffers. Positive teacher–child relations also are a strong buffer, although research indicates that immigrant and minority children often have less positive relations with their teachers. We close with a discussion on recent EVT-based intervention research that shows how children’s beliefs and values for different school subjects can be fostered.

Details

Motivation in Education at a Time of Global Change
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-613-4

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