Search results

1 – 10 of over 16000
Article
Publication date: 9 November 2010

Wee Li Woon and Lim Yoke Mui

This paper aims to propose a new format to present the cost of building conservation works which will better reflect the actual cost components and have a higher relevance…

2508

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to propose a new format to present the cost of building conservation works which will better reflect the actual cost components and have a higher relevance to building conservation works.

Design/methodology/approach

To achieve the study's aim of presenting a new format suitable for building conservation works, a total of 16 conservation projects were selected and work items of the highest frequency were identified and aggregated into the relevant elemental component to formulate a new elemental cost format.

Findings

Work items of the highest frequency identified are partitions, doors and ironmongeries, followed by roof finishes and rainwater goods, floor finishes, external walls and windows. In addition to the usual building works, new work items such as scientific analysis, archaeology excavation and temporary roof are also found to be important.

Research limitations/implications

The proposed format has yet to be tested in the local industry, which is necessary to ensure compatibility with industry needs.

Practical implications

This new cost analysis format includes a list of work items that are specific to building conservation works, which may guide the quantity surveyor in preparing a budget/cost estimate with higher accuracy by reducing the risk of omitted work items that are pertinent in building conservation works.

Originality/value

Owing to the lack of cost data information for building conservation works, estimating and controlling the cost in this area of work is very challenging. The proposed new format of elemental cost analysis designed for building conservation works seeks to fill this void by providing a guide in estimating costs for building conservation.

Details

Structural Survey, vol. 28 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-080X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 29 March 2021

Arturo Cruz, Vaughan Coffey, Tommy H.T. Chan and Miljenka Perovic

This paper presents and illustrates the model of a maintenance-focussed conservation plan developed in the thesis. It proposes a framework which puts more emphasis on…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper presents and illustrates the model of a maintenance-focussed conservation plan developed in the thesis. It proposes a framework which puts more emphasis on maintenance in conservation than reconstruction, restorations, repairs or even a “do-nothing” approach.

Design/methodology/approach

The research was conducted in an Australian context, where many major buildings are categorised as being “modern heritage”. However, the main problem with modern heritage is that although it has become more celebrated within the architectural historical sector, maintenance is still only in the background of most facility management (FM) operations, and its critical importance has yet to become accepted as a potential solution to greatly facilitate the proper preservation of the nation's architectural legacy. Challenges and barriers to this approach were evaluated, whilst opportunities were identified to improve a failing current situation that has resulted in the loss of many existing heritage structures. The paper makes a strong case in order to highlight the necessity of embedding a maintenance approach in preserving the historical fabric of buildings in the heritage conservation sector.

Findings

This research examines the key strategies for a maintenance-focussed conservation system.

Originality/value

The paper tackles experiences and issues in Australia about a lack of focus on maintenance as a conservation intervention.

Details

Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1266

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 June 2021

Arturo Cruz, Vaughan Coffey, Tommy H.T. Chan and Miljenka Perovic

This paper presents a conceptual design process for developing a maintenance-focused heritage conservation model. Currently, there are several intervention approaches that…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper presents a conceptual design process for developing a maintenance-focused heritage conservation model. Currently, there are several intervention approaches that can be applied in conservation from reconstruction, restoration and repairs to a “do-nothing” approach. This paper examines whether a maintenance solution is more than just an option or a necessity. The aim of the paper is to study the challenges and opportunities when putting more emphasis on the maintenance approach in conservation.

Design/methodology/approach

This research was conducted in an Australian context, where many major buildings were constructed from the 19th and 20th centuries and are now categorised as “modern heritage”. three case studies were undertaken to inform this paper and others. In addition, 17 global heritage conservation experts were interviewed, and their responses were analysed. Also, comparative field observations and archival records were examined and used to develop the initial framework model. Finally, using focus group discussions amongst 7 experts, the framework was reviewed and formally validated in order to ensure the development of a useful model for use in devising an effective maintenance management plan and monitoring conditions in heritage buildings.

Findings

This paper supports others in a series that have already been accepted by this journal, focussing the research on heritage building conservation being conducted in Australia, the homeland of the Burra Charter. The other papers are entitled (1) model for the maintenance-focused heritage building conservation and (2) engineering in heritage conservation.

Originality/value

The paper examines contemporary issues in heritage building maintenance and conservation in Australia and focusses specifically on the lack of focus on maintenance as a conservation intervention for heritage buildings.

Details

Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1266

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 January 2020

Alexa Woodward and David Heesom

Heritage or historic building information modelling (BIM), often referred to as HBIM, is becoming an established feature in both research and practice. The advancement of…

Abstract

Purpose

Heritage or historic building information modelling (BIM), often referred to as HBIM, is becoming an established feature in both research and practice. The advancement of data capture technologies such as laser scanning and improved photogrammetry, along with the continued power of BIM authoring tools, has provided the ability to generate more accurate digital representations of heritage buildings which can then be used during renovation and refurbishment projects. Very often these representations of HBIM are developed to support the design process. What appears to be often overlooked is the issue of conservation and how this can be linked to the BIM process to support the conservation management plan for the building once it is given a new lease of life following the refurbishment process. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper presents a review of the context of conservation and HBIM, and then subsequently presents two case studies of how HBIM was applied to high-profile renovation and conservation projects in the UK. In presenting the case studies, a range of issues is identified which support findings from the literature noting that HBIM is predominantly a tool for the geometric modelling of historic fabric with less regard for the actual process of renovation and conservation in historic buildings.

Findings

Lessons learnt from the case studies and from existing literature are distilled to develop a framework for the implementation of HBIM on heritage renovation projects to support the ongoing conservation of the building as an integral part of a BIM-based asset management strategy. Five key areas are identified in the framework including value, significance, recording, data management and asset management. Building on this framework, a conceptual overlay is proposed to the current Level 2 BIM process to support conservation heritage projects.

Originality/value

This paper addresses the issue of HBIM application to conservation heritage projects. Whilst previous work in the field has identified conservation as a key area, there is very little work focusing on the process of conservation in the HBIM context. This work provides a framework and overlay which could be used by practitioners and researchers to ensure that HBIM is fully exploited and a more standardised method is employed which could be used on conservation heritage renovation projects.

Details

International Journal of Building Pathology and Adaptation, vol. 39 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-4708

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 May 2016

Lim Yoke Mui, Yahaya Ahmad and Faezeh Nabavi

– The purpose of this paper is to identify the reasons for the variance among tenders for conservation projects in Malaysia.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify the reasons for the variance among tenders for conservation projects in Malaysia.

Design/methodology/approach

Semi-structured interview approach was adopted because this method allows for effective probing of issues. The interviews are conducted with experienced conservation contractors. The interviews are transcribed and the data are analysed using thematic analysis. Coefficient of variation (CV) measure was also used to determine the level of variance that occurs in tenders for conservation projects.

Findings

The study found that contractors faced difficulty in pricing competitively due to the following four factors, namely, uncertain information on the actual work on site, inexperience in conservation construction works, information in the bill of quantities is incomplete and uncertain labour and material cost. The study of 22 tenders also ascertains that there is a high variance among the tenderers for building conservation projects. This is determined by the CV analysis where conservation works has a mean CV of 25.5 per cent as compared to 6.5 per cent for new build works.

Research limitations/implications

While the interviews managed to draw out insights into the reasons for the high variance among the tender amounts, a definitive conclusion cannot be drawn on the level of variance in tendering for conservation projects due to the limited data that is available for analysis.

Originality/value

The paper offers an insight into the reasons why tenders for conservation projects usually have a higher variance than the norm.

Details

Structural Survey, vol. 34 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-080X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 August 2013

Esther H.K. Yung and Edwin H.W. Chan

This study aims to examine whether there are significant differences between laymen's, professionals' and policy makers' evaluations of the conservation of historic buildings.

1759

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine whether there are significant differences between laymen's, professionals' and policy makers' evaluations of the conservation of historic buildings.

Design/methodology/approach

The research began with interview surveys using a sample of laymen and professionals in the built environment and it examined their evaluation standards of a sample of 25 historic buildings in Hong Kong. The research also used the controversial Queen's Pier case to examine the extent to which different preferences of conservation between laymen and professionals and policy makers has led to its conservation campaign.

Findings

The results indicate that laymen and professional groups evaluate historic buildings based on slightly different criteria. The research also reveals that their preference for what is worth conserving is different from policy makers. The debate over the conservation of the Queen's Pier illustrates a wide range of issues other than differences of preference that may have stimulated the campaign.

Research limitations/implications

The sample size of the respondents and the sample buildings are limited due to manpower resource and funding. Further study can expand the sampling size.

Originality/value

The study is original research which illustrates the differences between laymen's, professionals' and policy makers' evaluation criteria and assessment of historic buildings. It recommends a greater understanding of all stakeholders' interests in heritage conservation and the incorporation of the public's view into legislative and administrative procedures in designating and listing historic buildings.

Details

Facilities, vol. 31 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 November 2007

Kemi Adeyeye, Mohamed Osmani and Claire Brown

The purpose of this paper is threefold; to investigate the potential impact of energy conservation policies and legislation on building design; examine energy conservation

3780

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is threefold; to investigate the potential impact of energy conservation policies and legislation on building design; examine energy conservation practices in the building industry; and identify associated barriers to an integrated low energy architectural design process.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey of UK architectural design practices was conducted to assess the impact of current energy conservation policies and legislation on current building design, and ascertain architects' views on the associated barriers and incentives to implementing and sustaining energy conservation strategies in their projects.

Findings

Results reveal that building design is affected by existing legislation but often not by policies. Additionally, there is a lack of incentives for the building industry to adopt and implement low energy design strategies that are outlined in existing policies and guidance. Furthermore, results identify a need for increased awareness of the available energy saving technologies.

Research limitations/implications

Architects are the first point of contact for driving more energy efficient design and conservation strategies. Therefore, this study was confined to a cross section of their opinions of energy conservation within the UK building industry.

Practical implications

The study is useful for those interested in the current levels of implementation of low energy design strategies and the recommendations for the future of the energy conservation and building design in the UK.

Originality/value

The study of energy conservation and building design provides insights into current environmental design practices; and identifies problems for the implementation of effective and integrated low energy building design process. The content should be of interest to architects, as it highlights the current level of implementation of energy conservation measures in building design.

Details

Structural Survey, vol. 25 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-080X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 18 May 2015

Brit Anak Kayan

It is well recognised that Conservation Plan has attracted attention to the maintenance of historic buildings; despite diverse array of issues, particularly associated…

Abstract

Purpose

It is well recognised that Conservation Plan has attracted attention to the maintenance of historic buildings; despite diverse array of issues, particularly associated with “Green Maintenance” concept and methodology and sustainable repair approach. The theory of these three concepts currently exists, but fails to be realised in practical integration. The purpose of this paper to ask why this failure is occurring and how it influences sustainable historic environment.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is composed of a critical review of existing literature and an argument built based on the concept of a Conservation Plan, “Green Maintenance” concept and methodology and sustainable repair approach for historic buildings.

Findings

Despite the need of maintenance of historic buildings, this review suggests that a Conservation Plan often mitigates against its own association with “Green Maintenance”. Conversely, this could be improved by transforming the integration to be more pronounced in achieving sustainable repair for historic buildings.

Practical implications

An integration of the concept of a Conservation Plan, “Green Maintenance” and sustainable repair approach could be utilised to form the basis of decision-making process for achieving sustainable historic environment.

Social implications

An integration of Conservation Plan, “Green Maintenance” and sustainable repair approach will be positively welcomed as our society moves towards a low carbon economy and materials as well as “green” procurement.

Originality/value

Unless integration between of a Conservation Plan, “Green Maintenance” and sustainable repair is improved, much of our culturally significant historic buildings will not be repaired in sustainable ways and our future generation may lose their historic environment.

Details

Smart and Sustainable Built Environment, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6099

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 March 2018

Andrea Luciani and Davide Del Curto

The purpose of this paper is to describe the cross-fertilisation process between the concept of resilience and building conservation. The authors discuss how the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe the cross-fertilisation process between the concept of resilience and building conservation. The authors discuss how the conservation field can address new issues posed by climate change and whether the concept of resilience plays a role within the framework of sustainable building conservation.

Design/methodology/approach

Starting from the use of resilience as a “travelling concept”, different interpretations of the term emerging from different fields are compared and interrelated in order to understand how this concept can impact future research in building conservation.

Findings

In addition to summarising recent developments in conservation theory with a special focus on how sustainability has influenced the field, this work also suggests some lines of research where resilience could foster interdisciplinary approaches to building conservation and presents some controversial outcomes.

Originality/value

The paper raises a discussion on how the concept of resilience could renew the field of building conservation, helping contemporary society to address the challenges of climate change.

Details

Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1266

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 November 2019

Satu Huuhka and Inge Vestergaard

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the relation between building conservation and circular economy (CE), which are often erroneously seen as inherently contradictory…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the relation between building conservation and circular economy (CE), which are often erroneously seen as inherently contradictory to one another.

Design/methodology/approach

The work draws from a comparative approach. The paper reviews a body of literature on architectural conservation and CE to establish an understanding on the state-of-the-art for both disciplines separately. Then, the relation between thereof is developed through a theoretical discourse.

Findings

Both architectural conservation and CE aim at safeguarding value, although they define “value” differently. Fabric-focused conservation and CE favor minimal intervention to material, albeit they arrive at this conclusion from different bases. Consequently, both approaches struggle with the low cost of virgin resource extraction and waste production and the high cost of human labor in contemporary Western societies. CE could be harnessed for building conservation by adopting its vocabulary and methodology, such as lifecycle assessment and material flow analysis. Transitioning toward CE can help increase the preservation of built heritage while redefining what is meant by “heritage” and “waste.”

Originality/value

Prior to this paper, there have been no articles addressing the relationship of the concepts explicitly and to this extent. The paper provides a theoretical basis for further discourse and outlines some implications of CE for the construction and built heritage disciplines.

Details

Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1266

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 16000