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Book part
Publication date: 30 November 2020

Farzana Quoquab and Jihad Mohammad

This chapter focuses on discussing the Malaysian government's ‘No Plastic Bag Day’ campaign. This is due to the fact that consumers are accustomed to use plastic bag in…

Abstract

This chapter focuses on discussing the Malaysian government's ‘No Plastic Bag Day’ campaign. This is due to the fact that consumers are accustomed to use plastic bag in their daily life activities. However, considering the hazardous impact on the environment, the government has banned the use of plastic bag in most of the states. While many consumers accepted this new rule whole-heartedly, many are still struggling to adopt it. This chapter highlights its journey of implementation and challenges pertaining to this sustainability marketing campaign in Malaysia.

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Book part
Publication date: 15 June 2020

Thomas Walker, Dieter Gramlich and Adele Dumont-Bergeron

In 2017, global plastic production reached 348 million tonnes. Despite growing concerns about the environmental challenges associated with both plastic production and…

Abstract

In 2017, global plastic production reached 348 million tonnes. Despite growing concerns about the environmental challenges associated with both plastic production and plastic waste, recent estimates suggest that plastic production and subsequent waste is expected to double by the year 2035 (European Commission, 2018). To help reduce the amount of plastic waste that litters the oceans and damages the environment, the European Union has recently commissioned a study about the feasibility of levying a tax on plastic products (New Economic Foundation for the Rethink Plastic Alliance, 2018). However, very few academic articles currently exist that critically examine the arguments for or against a plastic tax and thereby enlighten government and regulators on the subject. This chapter investigates whether plastic taxes can be used as an economic disincentive for plastic products and explores its advantages and disadvantages within a circular economy. It explores whether a plastic tax is the right economic instrument to limit the use of plastics, generate design and technical innovations for bio-based materials and degradable/recyclable plastics, create other economic incentives to optimize the value of plastic and its waste collection, and increase public awareness and responsibility. We find that a plastic tax may be a suitable solution as it is likely to influence the design, production, consumption, and waste sectors if designed properly. Yet, the tax should be carefully implemented and combined with other instruments to obtain the desired outcomes and reduce the occurrence of unfavorable side effects.

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Article
Publication date: 29 April 2021

Chuong Hong Pham, Hung Vu Nguyen, Mai Thi Thu Le, Long Thanh Do and Phuong Thi Tung Nguyen

This paper employed the self-determination theory (SDT) to examine the synergistic impacts of intrinsic, extrinsic and prosocial motivations in promoting sustained…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper employed the self-determination theory (SDT) to examine the synergistic impacts of intrinsic, extrinsic and prosocial motivations in promoting sustained pro-environmental consumption behaviors (PECB). To provide evidence for the study’s theoretical framework, the authors focus on the behavior of reducing single-use plastics.

Design/methodology/approach

A mall-intercept survey for consumption of single-use plastic products in three big cities of Vietnam (Hanoi, Da Nang and Ho Chi Minh city) was conducted to test the theoretical framework. In total, 468 consumers completed the questionnaires. Data were analyzed with SPSS and AMOS.

Findings

Intrinsic and prosocial motivations are found to be significant predictors of sustained PECB. More importantly, beyond the direct effects of intrinsic and prosocial motivations, the authors also found positive interaction effects between intrinsic and extrinsic motivation and between intrinsic and prosocial motivation on encouraging sustained PECB.

Originality/value

This research offers a new insight for encouraging sustained PECB. Different from the extant perspectives which usually deal with initiating PECB, the authors emphasize sustaining the behavior. Moreover, this research examines the interaction effects between intrinsic and extrinsic motivations and between intrinsic and prosocial motivations in sustaining PECB.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 25 March 2021

Aaron McKinnon

Purpose: This paper offers a first look into journalistic coverage on the enduring issue of marine litter. The presented study seeks to identify dominating news issue…

Abstract

Purpose: This paper offers a first look into journalistic coverage on the enduring issue of marine litter. The presented study seeks to identify dominating news issue frames of marine pollution to analyse the prospective approaches of journalists.

Method: A content analysis of print news-of-record sources was conducted. The theoretical background of Cultural Studies and Political Consumerism Theory was employed to analyse environmental reporting in the United States and France.

Findings: The main result is that French sources focus primarily on proposed legislation and political commentary around the issue instead of ways for readers to solve the problem themselves. Journalists who assert legislation as the principal method for fighting marine debris eliminate plastic from the source. Conversely, American journalists predominantly framed the environmental threat of marine debris as a cultural issue. This individualistic approach aims to motivate privileged readers to make lifestyle changes that, notionally, will suppress global consumption of single-use plastics.

Research limitations/implications: The individualistic approach common in American news coverage aims to motivate privileged readers to make lifestyle changes that, notionally, will suppress global consumption of single-use plastics. This approach does not reflect the scientific communities overwhelming scepticism of oversimplistic solutions to this global environmental issue.

Originality/value: This foundational paper offers issue frames through which social science research on framing, rhetorical criticism and media effects of marine litter news coverage can build upon.

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Article
Publication date: 20 June 2019

Ryan Christopher Graydon, Paola Andrea Gonzalez, Abdiel Elias Laureano-Rosario and Guillermo Reginald Pradieu

Bottled water consumption continues to break records worldwide and its environmental impact is often underestimated by the consumer. Many factors affect individuals…

Abstract

Purpose

Bottled water consumption continues to break records worldwide and its environmental impact is often underestimated by the consumer. Many factors affect individuals’ choices to consume tap water and bottled water including perceived health risks and water quality. The University of South Florida (USF) has joined a nationwide initiative to become carbon-neutral, and reducing bottled water consumption was a chosen strategy. The purpose of this study was to assess the risk perceptions and drinking water choices of the USF-Tampa campus community.

Design/methodology/approach

A sample of 561 students, faculty and staff members responded to an online survey. The survey contained questions about the use of bottled water and tap water, reusable water bottles, risk perceptions and demographics.

Findings

The results revealed that certain groups – undergraduate students and ethnic/racial minorities (e.g. black/African American, Hispanic/Latino) – drank significantly more bottled water. Among political ideologies, Liberals drank the least bottled water. Females and minorities had significantly greater risk perceptions of the tap water on campus. Important perceived benefits were tap water being less expensive and better for the environment than bottled water. Important perceived barriers were poor tasting tap water and the desire for filtered water.

Originality/value

The findings suggest the need for public health campaigns to increase awareness of health, environmental and financial consequences of bottled water consumption. Such campaigns should aim to discourage bottled water and any potential increased sugar-sweetened beverage consumption while promoting tap water consumption.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

Keywords

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Abstract

Details

Communicating Social and Environmental Issues Effectively
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-467-0

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Article
Publication date: 5 July 2021

Desiderio Gutiérrez Taño, Janet Hernández Méndez and Ricardo Díaz-Armas

Approaches based on social marketing have led to the proposal of systemic interventions to achieve individual behaviour that takes into account the benefits for society as…

Abstract

Purpose

Approaches based on social marketing have led to the proposal of systemic interventions to achieve individual behaviour that takes into account the benefits for society as a whole. The use of plastics is having significant negative effects on the environment and so numerous policies such as the use of biodegradable packaging, have been implemented to ensure sustainable production and consumption patterns (Sustainable Development Goal 12). This paper aims to analyse the background factors that explain consumer intention to use bioplastics with the aim of guiding company and government social marketing campaigns designed to encourage such behaviour.

Design/methodology/approach

To gather data, a survey was carried out using a sample of 3,612 people obtained via an online panel made up of participants over 18 years of age. The model and its hypotheses were tested by structural equations with the PLS technique using six independent variables obtained from the literature review.

Findings

The results of the variables “attitude towards bioplastics”, “subjective norms” and “activity to reduce plastic use” show a significant influence on intention to use bioplastics. This paper will also discuss the implications for governments and environmental managers to be taken into account when developing social marketing campaigns.

Social implications

Given the importance of perceived social pressure in terms of behaviour regarding the use of recyclable bioplastics, social marketing campaigns may be developed to encourage environmentally-responsible behaviour amongst different social agents such as consumers, businesses, governmental organisations and suppliers.

Originality/value

This study demonstrates the factors that explain intentions to use bioplastics, which until now had been subject to very little research.

Details

Journal of Social Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-6763

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 6 February 2017

Siwaporn Tangwanichagapong, Vilas Nitivattananon, Brahmanand Mohanty and Chettiyappan Visvanathan

This paper aims to describe the effects of 3R (reduce, reuse and recycle) waste management initiatives on a campus community. It ascertains the environmental attitudes and…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to describe the effects of 3R (reduce, reuse and recycle) waste management initiatives on a campus community. It ascertains the environmental attitudes and opinions of the residents and investigates their behavioral responses to waste management initiatives. Practical implications for enhancing sustainable waste management are discussed in this paper.

Design/methodology/approach

Demonstration projects on waste segregation and recycling, as well as waste a reduction campaign, were set up on the campus to ascertain people’s attitudes and investigate their behavioral responses toward 3R practices. Data were collected through a questionnaire survey, observations, interviews and the project’s document review. A waste audit and waste composition analysis was carried out to assess waste flows and actual waste management behaviors and measure the change in the recycling rate.

Findings

3R waste management initiatives had positive effects on people’s attitudes about resources, waste management and consciousness of the need to avoid waste, but these initiatives did not affect recycling and waste management behavior. A voluntary approach-only cannot bring about behavioral change. Incentive measures showed a greater positive effect on waste reduction to landfills. Nevertheless, the demonstration projects helped to increase the overall campus recycling from 10 to 12 per cent.

Originality/value

This paper addresses a literature gap about the 3R attitudes and resulting behavior as part of campus sustainability of higher education institutions in a developing country. The authors’ results revealed hurdles to be overcome and presents results that can be compared to behavioral responses of people from other developed countries. These findings can be used as a guide for higher education institution’s policy-makers, as they indicate that voluntary instruments alone will not yield effective results, and other mechanisms that have an impact on people's behavior are required.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2014

Jennifer Lynes, Stephanie Whitney and Dan Murray

This article aims to propose that increased guidance on the implementation of social marketing principles for sustainability issues can advance both implementation and…

Abstract

Purpose

This article aims to propose that increased guidance on the implementation of social marketing principles for sustainability issues can advance both implementation and empirical evaluation. The primary goal of this paper is to ignite further empirical investigation of social marketing for sustainability by first presenting benchmark criteria for one social marketing model – community-based social marketing (CBSM) – and second, applying this framework to the case study of musician Jack Johnson’s “All at Once” (AAO) campaign.

Design/methodology/approach

The research design is twofold. First, based on Doug McKenzie-Mohr’s CBSM model, a series of 21 benchmarks for assessing the key components of an effective CBSM initiative was developed. Second, this tool was applied to information gathered from Jack Johnson’s extensive outreach promoting AAO initiatives including reports, videos as well as interviews and in-person meetings with the Jack Johnson team.

Findings

Application of the benchmark criteria to the Jack Johnson case study showed that seven out of the 21 benchmarks were integrated into the AAO campaign; seven were partially integrated and seven were not integrated in the program’s design. In particular, the use of commitments, incentives, norms and social diffusion was clearly present as was a final evaluation of the full-scale implementation of the campaign.

Originality/value

The CBSM benchmarks are meant as a starting point to further assess and compare the effectiveness of CBSM initiatives. Further research should be done to explore how criteria should be weighted and which of the 21 principles need to be present in the design and implementation of an effective CBSM program.

Details

Journal of Social Marketing, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-6763

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 25 October 2018

Leigh Sparks

The UK food retailing sector has undergone a radical transformation over the last 70 or so years. It has become a sector dominated by very large businesses with…

Abstract

The UK food retailing sector has undergone a radical transformation over the last 70 or so years. It has become a sector dominated by very large businesses with considerable power over both the upstream and downstream supply chain. The scale and power of those leading retailers has attracted considerable academic focus and political attention. In the first two decades of the twenty-first century, global concern has emerged via a number of grand challenges including sustainability. Retailers have increasingly sought to address issues of corporate social responsibility (CSR) and sustainability, both to stave off criticism and for reasons of operational efficiency. The scale of the UK’s leading food retailers thus becomes a two-edged sword; should these retailers be co-opted in the fight for global sustainability or radically challenged as the cause of many of the problems? This chapter reviews the changing roles of food retailers, their steps in CSR and then poses the question as the future role of retailers in this changing environmental landscape.

Details

Food Retailing and Sustainable Development
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-554-2

Keywords

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