Search results

1 – 10 of 244
Article
Publication date: 21 July 2023

Chelsey Sara Taylor, Michael L. Naraine, Katie Rowe, Jonathan Robertson and Adam Karg

The purpose of this study was to explore the process of change in existing professional sport organisations as they initiate a women's team.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to explore the process of change in existing professional sport organisations as they initiate a women's team.

Design/methodology/approach

Three Australian Football League clubs with licenses for professional women's teams were examined, with semi-structured interviews held with three key department managers from each club.

Findings

The findings suggest organisations adopt either a community-focused or commercially focused approach, the selection of which is a response to the interplay of institutional pressures (e.g. league demands), resource demands (e.g. human and financial) and the strategic choices of a few, key “idea champions”.

Originality/value

This study provides insight into the approach change taken by clubs as they introduce a women's team into their existing organisational structure.

Details

Sport, Business and Management: An International Journal, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-678X

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 7 April 2015

Jonathan Robertson

704

Abstract

Details

Corporate Governance, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-0701

Expert briefing
Publication date: 21 May 2018

The coalition has been in office since October 2017 under Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern. This budget combines fiscal restraint with increased social, foreign affairs and aid…

Article
Publication date: 5 August 2021

Joseph Dixon and Jonathan Parker

This paper aims to explore student perceptions of recycling and explore whether one university’s strategy helped or hindered student recycling in their university's halls of…

1169

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore student perceptions of recycling and explore whether one university’s strategy helped or hindered student recycling in their university's halls of residence. There is near-universal acknowledgement of the urgency of the climate crisis, yet household recycling rates remain low at 45.2%. Student-recycling rates have been suggested to be even lower. After a brief consideration of the recent history of sustainability and recycling, this paper identifies the actions required to increase student recycling, including peer influence, education and information, physical structures and attitudes and motivations.

Design/methodology/approach

Twelve in-depth, semi-structured interviews were undertaken at one Southern English university. The rich, qualitative data obtained were then analysed thematically. The theory of environmentally significant behaviour provided a framework for understanding perceptions and behaviours in that site.

Findings

Confirming aspects of existing literature, students’ recycling behaviours were found to be limited through lack of perceived ability, lack of facilities and unconfident knowledge. Students were also found to be limiting their own actions. A holistic approach including peer influence, education and information, physical structures and attitudes and motivations was recommended.

Originality/value

There is little research into student recycling behaviours and limited literature concerning halls of residence, especially in the UK. This paper draws on one case to add to nascent understandings. While limited to one site and by sample size, a number of recommendations are made, covering university facilities, student empowerment and individual responsibility to increase future recycling.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 23 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2000

Ann Gilks, Jonathan Palmer, Lisa Robertson and Vivien Shute

In support of the UN Year of a Society for All Ages, this article suggests that Scottish Homes should lobby government to increase grants to developers who will build 25 per cent…

Abstract

In support of the UN Year of a Society for All Ages, this article suggests that Scottish Homes should lobby government to increase grants to developers who will build 25 per cent more SMART homes to barrier free standards by 2010. It concludes that as part of the communication campaign, a major re‐education programme should encourage people currently in their fifties to think ahead about their future housing needs.

Details

Corporate Communications: An International Journal, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1356-3289

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 22 May 2017

Gloria Boutte

This chapter addresses the National Association for the Education of Young Children’s ethical principle of “First Do No Harm” from the perspective of racial equity issues that…

Abstract

This chapter addresses the National Association for the Education of Young Children’s ethical principle of “First Do No Harm” from the perspective of racial equity issues that seemingly are not obvious to educators or often overlooked in the education of Black children. Two complementary points are made. First, many educators tend to view discrimination in terms of intentional and overt actions, but may not realize how they can and do inadvertently harm children during everyday classroom routines, instructional practices, policies, and curriculum that position African American culture invisible or abnormal. Second, even though teachers might not be cognizant or aware of institutional racism that is endemic in policies, instruction, curriculum, practices, and routines, their involvement in these practices represents an ethical problem and violates the “do no harm” principle. While most P-12 teachers and teacher educators agree in theory with the idea of valuing cultural and linguistic diversity, changing actions, and deeply-seated teaching practices and dispositions can only be accomplished by challenging and disrupting normalizing discourses in the policies that inform instructional practices, curriculum, and the pedagogies used in teacher education programs and in P-12 schools. This chapter suggests that teacher education programs use decolonizing frameworks for addressing equity academic and social issues for African American students. A discussion of institutional levels of oppression and praxis are included. Examples of barriers and promising practices are shared. An overarching theme is that early childhood teacher educators must unapologetically, thoughtfully, intentionally, and comprehensively advance issues concerning educational equity for African American students.

Details

African American Children in Early Childhood Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-258-9

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 16 December 2017

Riccardo Bellofiore and Scott Carter

Resurgent interest in the life and work of the Italian Cambridge economist Piero Sraffa is leading to New Directions in Sraffa Scholarship. This chapter introduces readers to some…

Abstract

Resurgent interest in the life and work of the Italian Cambridge economist Piero Sraffa is leading to New Directions in Sraffa Scholarship. This chapter introduces readers to some of these developments. First and perhaps foremost is the fact that as of September 2016 Sraffa’s archival material has been uploaded onto the website of the Wren Library, Trinity College, Cambridge University, as digital colour images; this chapter introduces readers to the history of these events. This history provides sharp relief on the extant debates over the role of the archival material in leading to the final publication of Production of Commodities by Means of Commodities, and readers are provided a brief sketch of these matters. The varied nature of Sraffa scholarship is demonstrated by the different aspects of Sraffa’s intellectual legacy which are developed and discussed in the various entries of our Symposium. The conclusion is reached that we are on the cusp of an exciting phase change of tremendous potential in Sraffa scholarship.

Details

Including a Symposium on New Directions in Sraffa Scholarship
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-539-9

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 January 2023

Parisa Diba, Jonathan Bowden, Andrew Divers, Beth Taylor, Dorothy Newbury-Birch and Jonathan Ling

Integrated service models aim to simplify access, enable effective delivery, remove duplication and provide a holistic and person-centred approach. This project explored the…

Abstract

Purpose

Integrated service models aim to simplify access, enable effective delivery, remove duplication and provide a holistic and person-centred approach. This project explored the development of integrated well-being services in two local authorities in North-East England. The purpose of this paper is to address this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

Underpinned by public health and co-production approaches, the project utilised a mixed-methods approach. Data were collected via online surveys (n = 95), virtual interviews with members of the local population (n = 8) and practitioners and commissioners (n = 8) to explore needs for a new service. Thematic analysis was used to identify key themes and issues.

Findings

Several benefits of an integrated service were highlighted by both staff and service users, with a central anticipated benefit being the provision of holistic care. Improvement in information sharing was also seen to increase the efficiency of services and communication barriers between services. Beneficial aspects and barriers related to the COVID-19 pandemic on current service provision were reported that have informed our future recommendations.

Originality/value

The authors’ findings provide a much deeper insight into function, care, social inclusion and ongoing support needs, from both the perspectives of staff and service users. Service users and staff saw value in an integrated model for themselves, as well as the wider community. The authors’ findings indicate that the integrated service model is a promising one for the development of services within local authorities.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 31 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 4 December 2023

Stuart Cartland

Abstract

Details

Constructing Realities
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83797-546-4

Article
Publication date: 1 August 2001

Nada Korac‐Kakabadse, Alexander Kouzmin, Andrew Korac‐Kakabadse and Lawson Savery

States that the major reasons for difficulties in cross‐cultural communication stem from the fact that actors from different cultures have different understandings regarding the…

19687

Abstract

States that the major reasons for difficulties in cross‐cultural communication stem from the fact that actors from different cultures have different understandings regarding the interaction process and different styles of dialogue. Suggests that better understanding of communication within other cultures is the key to success. Uses past literature to suggest a number of cultural variability constructs concerning preferred interaction behaviours and the common themes they share. Presents three case studies to illustrate this.

Details

Cross Cultural Management: An International Journal, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7606

Keywords

1 – 10 of 244