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Article
Publication date: 16 March 2015

Simon Wallace and Steve Riley

Tourism 2025 – Growing Value Together/Whakatipu Uara Ngatahi is a framework to unite New Zealand's large and diverse tourism industry and ignite strong, aspirational…

Abstract

Purpose

Tourism 2025 – Growing Value Together/Whakatipu Uara Ngatahi is a framework to unite New Zealand's large and diverse tourism industry and ignite strong, aspirational economic growth. Its goal is to see the tourism industry contribute $41 billion a year to the New Zealand economy by 2025, up from $24 billion now. It provides vital context for some collective actions by big or small industry clusters and for thousands of actions individual businesses will take each year. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

A wide range of tourism industry stakeholders were consulted over an 18‐month period to ensure the project was being developed on a solid, evidence‐based foundation. There was strong stakeholder support for a framework which the private sector takes ownership of and responsibility for, but which also recognises that public sector support is vital. The project team developed a “straw‐man” growth framework model which resulted in carrying out detailed investigations and consultation to test and, where necessary, adjust that model into its final form.

Findings

There were four major forces shaping the global tourism market. There was one positive force for New Zealand countered by three tough challenges. The strawman growth framework comprised five separate yet inter‐connected “cycle of growth” themes. These themes are relatively consistent with global national tourism plans that were studied. Used intelligently and in harmony, with the industry fully understanding the inter‐relationships and inter‐dependencies within the “cycle of growth”, the key themes enable the tourism industry to successfully come to grips with the challenges and opportunities ahead.

Originality/value

Tourism 2025 is aimed at aligning the industry on a pathway towards aspirational growth.

Details

Journal of Tourism Futures, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2055-5911

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 27 April 2020

Tarik Dogru, Sean McGinley and Woo Gon Kim

The purpose of this paper is twofold: first, to examine the extent to which hotel investments create jobs and, second, to compare whether investment in a particular hotel…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is twofold: first, to examine the extent to which hotel investments create jobs and, second, to compare whether investment in a particular hotel segment generates more or less jobs in the overall economy and in the tourism, leisure and hospitality industries.

Design/methodology/approach

The panel autoregressive distributed lag regression model was used to examine the effect of total hotel investments and hotel investments in economy-scale, midscale, luxury-scale and independent hotels on total employment and employment in the tourism, leisure and hospitality industries in the USA.

Findings

Hotel investments increase employment in both the overall economy and the tourism, leisure and hospitality industries. Midscale hotels make the highest contribution to employment in the overall economy. Economy-scale hotels make the highest contribution to employment in the overall tourism, leisure and hospitality industries.

Research limitations/implications

The results support the postulations of growth pole theory. As hotel investment increases, not only does the hotel industry see gains in employment but also does related economic sectors see an increase. Midscale hotels have the greatest positive impact on local labor markets, which is consistent with the assertions of middle-out economics.

Practical implications

Community leaders should encourage the type of investment that benefits the broader area as much as possible by incentivizing the type of growth that is related to employment growth.

Originality/value

This study investigates the relations between hotel investment and employment from a theoretical and empirical perspective by providing objective claims inferred from statistical inferences.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 32 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 5 April 2013

Chandana (Chandi) Jayawardena, Anthony Pollard, Valerie Chort, Chris Choi and Wanjohi Kibicho

This paper aims to address the key sustainability issues in Canada's tourism and hospitality industry.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to address the key sustainability issues in Canada's tourism and hospitality industry.

Design/methodology/approach

The foundation for this paper was laid during a well attended Worldwide Hospitality and Tourism Themes (WHATT) roundtable discussion between industry leaders and hospitality educators in May 2012.

Findings

The paper provides valuable information on the concept of sustainable development and outlines key sustainability issues and trends in the Canadian tourism and hospitality industry. The umbrella organization for the hotel industry in Canada, the Hotel Association of Canada (HAC), collaborates with key stakeholders to find innovative and sustainable solutions to challenges the industry is facing. Top future trends are captured in the conclusion.

Practical implications

As the team of authors includes the president of the Hotel Association of Canada and a partner/Canada's national leader of the sustainability practice in the world's largest consulting firm, this paper will be of immense value to students, educators, researchers and industry leaders. Supports two innovative economic options to boost Canada's tourism marketing – reinvesting a portion of international visitor's GST and charging an international visitor arrival levy.

Originality/value

The paper draws on sustainability theories and best practices in Canada to explain the role of innovation in facing challenges in the tourism and hospitality industry in Canada. As the team of authors represents both the industry and academia, this paper will be of immense value to students, educators, and researchers, as well as practitioners.

Details

Worldwide Hospitality and Tourism Themes, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4217

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 7 August 2017

Maria Della Lucia and Giovanna Segre

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the role of intersectoriality within the cultural, creative and tourism industries in Italian local development.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the role of intersectoriality within the cultural, creative and tourism industries in Italian local development.

Design/methodology/approach

The research design builds on the literature on culture-led development and adapts the established body of empirical research on industrial districts to tourism and cultural development. The quantitative analysis of intersectoral specialization and the clustering of cultural, creative and tourism industries in Italian local labour systems (LLSs) combines specialization indexes with principal component analysis and cluster analysis.

Findings

About 50 per cent of Italian LLSs specialize in the economy of culture and tourism, mostly in material culture, although tourism has the highest level of specialization. There are three main patterns of agglomeration and clustering. The largest cluster is that of the cultural heritage and content and information industries, which coincides with the systems of medium-sized and large cities, followed by systems of tourism monoculture. The smallest is made up of material culture, typically made-in-Italy sectors. The tourism and material culture industries are monocultures – where tourism agglomerates, but material culture does not.

Research limitations/implications

The analytical approach is quantitative and based on Istat’s Industry and Trade (2012) data set. Further studies are needed on the interaction between agglomerated specialized industries.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the theoretical and political debate on the value generation and innovation potential of culture and creativity, and bridges the knowledge domains of local development and managerial studies. Novel statistical evidence on intersectoral specialization and the clustering of the cultural, creative and tourism sectors in Italy at the inter-municipal level is provided. This study helps to identify an Italian model of the economy of culture and tourism.

Details

International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6182

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 14 August 2017

William C. Murray, Statia Elliot, Keith Simmonds, Donnalea Madeley and Martin Taller

This paper aims to explore the challenges encountered by the hospitality and tourism industry in managing the labour challenges it faces presently and will face in the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the challenges encountered by the hospitality and tourism industry in managing the labour challenges it faces presently and will face in the coming years. Although there are several issues at play, there are actions that industry members can take both internally and by advocating externally for change.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper draws on insights from three industry members and two academics to explore key areas in which action can be taken to address labour demand challenges in the hospitality and tourism workforce. The identified action items combine these various types of expertise to provide a holistic frame of action.

Findings

The Canadian hospitality and tourism industry is facing an ever-increasing labour demand shortage. Industry members can confront this on multiple fronts, from front-line employee satisfaction to more regional and national advocacy efforts. A combination of activities is recommended.

Practical implications

Hospitality and tourism industry members can take numerous actions from this analysis, including developing stronger organization cultures that align with employee needs, exerting effort in balancing wage gap issues and maintaining pressure on government partners to provide support for establishing hospitality and tourism, so that it is viewed as a valuable career path.

Originality/value

This paper increases knowledge in the hospitality and tourism field by combining the current human resource management theory with observations from industry experts on the needs that exist now and are predicted in the coming years.

Details

Worldwide Hospitality and Tourism Themes, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4217

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2006

Yildirim Yilmaz and Umit Bititci

This is a conceptual paper. Its purpose is to compare the performance measurement of manufacturing and tourism industries from a value chain perspective.

Abstract

Purpose

This is a conceptual paper. Its purpose is to compare the performance measurement of manufacturing and tourism industries from a value chain perspective.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper achieves its objective by reviewing the relevant literature from both manufacturing and tourism fields. It compares and contrasts the particular characteristics of both industries as well as the work done in these fields with respect to performance measurement and management in their value chains.

Findings

The paper finds that in the manufacturing industry the latest thinking in supply chain management, and consequently value chain management, has led to the development of performance measurement frameworks for the entire supply chain – such as the SCOR model. The tourism industry, on the other hand, consists of various players and tourism demand is met by the joint efforts of these players. Consequently, the interdependency of tourism organizations is high. Although recent works demonstrate an increasing interest towards performance measurement in the tourism industry, it is still an immature area. The paper demonstrates the usability of SCOR‐like frameworks in the tourism industry to manage and measure the value chain processes.

Research limitations/implications

The paper shows mapping of existing thinking on performance measurement against the proposed tourism value chain model reveals gaps for further research, such as: the need to study the tourism industry as an end‐to‐end value chain; the need for understanding and measuring the performance of front‐end win‐order and pre‐delivery‐support processes; and the need for managing the delivery process as a whole, rather than as two or three unrelated services.

Originality/value

The paper demonstrates the potential benefits of taking a value‐chain approach to the tourism industry as well as conceptually demonstrating how performance of such a value chain may be managed through a framework of performance measures.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. 55 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 4 September 2017

Tamer Atef and Masooma Al Balushi

This paper aims to assess receptiveness for Tourism and Hospitality as a career path among students in the Tourism Department of Sultan Qaboos University (College of Arts…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to assess receptiveness for Tourism and Hospitality as a career path among students in the Tourism Department of Sultan Qaboos University (College of Arts and Social Sciences), located in the Sultanate of Oman. The following objectives were identified to achieve this aim: assess respondents’ perceptions of tourism and hospitality employment; respondents’ tourism and hospitality employment commitment factors; and respondents’ perceptions of tourism and hospitality jobs.

Design/methodology/approach

A self-administered questionnaire was used to gather data and measure respondents’ perceptions of the subject under investigation. Survey questions were developed from the literature reviewed which provided the framework for the questionnaire. The questionnaire comprises four different question categories: general information; students’ general perception of tourism and hospitality employment; and tourism and hospitality employment commitment factors; students’ perceptions of tourism and hospitality jobs. Data were tested for normality of distribution; then, means were used for data description and ranking; thereafter, the independent-samples t-test and analysis of variance were conducted to test for significance between groups of respondents; the level of significance used was p ≤ 0.05.

Findings

The paper revealed that nearly 41 per cent of the students will continue working in tourism and hospitality for some time. For them, working in the industry is a step on the way, but is not a career path. Only 21.6 per cent are willing to consider tourism and hospitality as their long-term chosen career path. Tourism and hospitality students’ perceptions of the industry tend to be negatively affected as they progress in their study plan. Commitment to employment in Tourism and Hospitality is shaped by four major interrelated factor categories: industry, personality, education and society. The Omani tourism and hospitality industry was not able to project an image that could generate interest among Omanis. Consequently, very few graduates join the Tourism and Hospitality job market, leading to shortages in Omani workers in the industry. The major drawback of such trend is the inability to achieve the Omanization planned figures.

Originality/value

The findings are intended to assist tourism and hospitality educators, employers and policymakers better understand students’ future employment intentions.

Details

Quality Assurance in Education, vol. 25 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4883

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1997

C. Michael Hall, Brock Cambourne, Niki Macionis and Gary Johnson

Wine tourism is an area of growing interest because of its potential to contribute to regional development and employment at times of rural restructuring, particularly…

Abstract

Wine tourism is an area of growing interest because of its potential to contribute to regional development and employment at times of rural restructuring, particularly through the development of inter and intra industry networks. This paper provides a review of wine tourism, briefly discusses networks and their value, then analyses the development of wine tourism networks in Australia and New Zealand. The research indicates that although wine tourism network development is being actively encouraged, substantial difficulties exist because of the perception by many in the wine industry that they are not part of tourism. The paper concludes that while the development of new organisational structures to encourage wine tourism development are useful, they must be complimented by research on linkages, education of potential network members in order to close information gaps; and the development of network structures which maximise the overlap and linkages mat exists between the wine and tourism industries.

Details

International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 14 August 2017

Chandana (Chandi) Jayawardena

This paper aims to provide practical solutions to the strategic question: “The hospitality and tourism industry in Canada: what are the main challenges and solutions?”. It…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide practical solutions to the strategic question: “The hospitality and tourism industry in Canada: what are the main challenges and solutions?”. It aims to capture the essence of scholarly contributions made by 25 Canadian experts and provide a conclusion to the Worldwide Hospitality Themes (WHATT) theme issue (v.9, n.4) dedicated to Canada.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper draws from key concepts, suggestions and solutions written by 25 Canadian authors in the previous papers of this theme issue. It is worth noting that these authors together have more than 700 years of experience in managing, operating and teaching all aspects of the tourism and hospitality industry. The paper presents nine summaries in the following order: the state of the industry (introductory article); finding innovative solutions for HR challenges (four articles); and new trends and innovation (four articles)

Findings

In conclusion, 20 recommendations relating to human capital enhancement, as well as general suggestions, are made to embrace useful trends and innovative thinking for future progress in Canada’s hospitality and tourism industry.

Practical implications

As this paper is a combination of many perspectives from nine co-authored articles, there is no single focus to draw common conclusions. For further information and analysis, it is recommended that the relevant articles from this theme issue be reviewed.

Originality/value

Readers interested in the Canadian hospitality and tourism industry will find this paper to be of interest.

Details

Worldwide Hospitality and Tourism Themes, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4217

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 15 December 2020

Ümit Şengel, Mustafa Çevrimkaya, Gökhan Genç, Merve Işkın, Burhanettin Zengin and Mehmet Sarıışık

This study examines the relationship of COVID-19 with the tourism industry in the context of news coverage. More specifically, this study analyzes the relationship between…

Abstract

Purpose

This study examines the relationship of COVID-19 with the tourism industry in the context of news coverage. More specifically, this study analyzes the relationship between COVID-19 and subsectors of tourism throughout different periods of the pandemic.

Design/methodology/approach

Qualitative research techniques were applied, and content analysis used, to analyze the collected data. The news contents obtained cover two one-week periods: March 5–12, 2020, and April 5–12, 2020. The content analysis method and MAXQDA program were used to analyze the data.

Findings

The research findings reveal that tourism and news related to COVID-19 were heavily connected with the travel industry during March 5–12, 2020, with concentrations slightly favoring the hospitality industry. In the period of April 5–12, 2020, the strong relationship between tourism and travel continued. During the latter period, the hospitality and the events industries were both subjects of relevant news.

Research limitations/implications

This study examined the news during a short period of time. In addition, the sample of the study does not represent all news in all media. Examining different media outlets and different news cycles may produce different results.

Originality/value

This is one of the first studies to examine the relationship between the pandemic and the tourism industry from a macro perspective in the context of news coverage. The study provides implications for policy-makers, tourism planners and industry.

Details

Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Insights, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9792

Keywords

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