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Book part
Publication date: 20 August 1996

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The Peace Dividend
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-44482-482-0

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Book part
Publication date: 20 August 1996

Jordin S. Cohen and Michael D. Ward

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The Peace Dividend
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-44482-482-0

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1996

Steve Chan and Henrik Sommer

This essay offers a number of propositions about the size, pace, and distribution of defense cutbacks and about the conversion of military resources to civilian purposes…

Abstract

This essay offers a number of propositions about the size, pace, and distribution of defense cutbacks and about the conversion of military resources to civilian purposes. We argue that the prospects for a peace dividend in the aftermath of the cold war are clouded by substantial political incentives and economic interests that may oppose or retard military retrenchment. We also contend that the resource savings from any military retrenchment may not neces-sarily be reallocated fully and efficiently to produce gains in civilian production and productivity. Such gains are apt to take some time to materialize whereas the political costs and socio-economic disruption caused by lower military expenditures are likely to be felt more immediately. Indeed, given their different social institutions, political cultures, and economic structures, different coun-tries may be expected to pursue alternative policy offsets that accompany any defense cutback, and they may be expected to encounter different conversion problems and derive different costs and benefits from efforts to convert swords into plowshares. We conclude with an agenda for future research.

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Journal of Public Budgeting, Accounting & Financial Management, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1096-3367

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The Peace Dividend
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-44482-482-0

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Abstract

Details

The Peace Dividend
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-44482-482-0

To view the access options for this content please click here

Abstract

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The Peace Dividend
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-44482-482-0

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Book part
Publication date: 29 July 2009

Partha Gangopadhyay and Manas Chatterji

The main thesis of the chapter is to introduce a new idea to the field of peace negotiations, which will require the development of a new model of negotiations to enforce…

Abstract

The main thesis of the chapter is to introduce a new idea to the field of peace negotiations, which will require the development of a new model of negotiations to enforce peace. The existing models of peace negotiations highlight the existence of a positive peace dividend to parties involved in conflicts and peace negotiation. They, hence, usually highlight a gradual and dynamic adjustment, or movement, away from a conflict-ridden outcome towards a peaceful outcome that offers a positive peace dividend to all relevant stakeholders. In comparison with the status quo, peace brings additional economic returns and peace therefore offers a win–win situation. Despite the fact that a win–win situation does not ensure the enforcement of peace, as agents can easily get locked into what is commonly known as the prisoners' dilemma – yet the possibility of Pareto improvement makes negotiations for peace somewhat artificial. At least in the short run all agents involved in active conflicts are apprehensive of peace as they expect immediate (expected) returns from making peace can outweigh the expected returns from conflicts. An important work that sidesteps the win–win situation of peace dividends is by Isard and Azis (1999) who introduced the possibility of an immediate loss of economic returns from the peace process in their conflict management procedure (CMP). However, in the existing work on CMP, the long-run returns from peace outweigh that from conflicts. One therefore presumes that peace brings economic benefits to all. The existing CMPs therefore assume away any possibility of lower economic returns from peace. There are some important models in which peace negotiations are also modelled as a zero-sum game in which the gain of a party represents a loss to others, which is known as win–lose negotiations. In this work we introduce the possibility of bargaining and negotiations against the backdrop of potential immediate losses while peace is favoured simply for its intrinsic value and not for pecuniary returns. In the real world, there is evidence to believe that agents involved in conflicts are painfully aware of two things: first, the decision-making agents who choose between conflicts vis-à-vis peace are the leaders who get rarely affected by economic returns from conflicts or peace. It is usually the foot soldiers who bear the brunt of costly conflicts and can benefit from peace. Secondly, most people value peace for the sake of it as peace has an intrinsic value that ensures the protection of rights and their lives and protection from violence. Thus, peace is a collective good that provides little extra economic returns to actual decision-makers who choose between courses of conflicts or peace.

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Peace Science: Theory and Cases
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-200-5

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Book part
Publication date: 20 August 1996

Olav Bjerkholt

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The Peace Dividend
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-44482-482-0

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Book part
Publication date: 20 August 1996

Adne Cappelen, Nils Petter Gleditsch and Olav Bjerkholt

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The Peace Dividend
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-44482-482-0

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