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Article
Publication date: 29 March 2013

James S. Denford

The purpose of this paper is to synthesize existing knowledge‐based dynamic capabilities research into a single typology for managerial and academic use.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to synthesize existing knowledge‐based dynamic capabilities research into a single typology for managerial and academic use.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on the resource‐based and knowledge‐based views, this study conducts a theoretically grounded typology development exercise based on an extensive review of the existing dynamic capabilities literature.

Findings

The paper identifies seven frameworks presented in the literature that showed some consistency in underlying concepts but conflict in nomenclature and application. Identifying over 80 uses of knowledge‐based dynamic capabilities in the literature review, three complementary dimensions that are common amongst the frameworks are identified and integrated into a consistent typology of eight knowledge‐based dynamic capabilities to encompass the extant literature.

Originality/value

Addressing fragmentation in the knowledge‐based dynamic capabilities discourse, the paper advances the concept of knowledge‐based dynamic capabilities by organizing the existing literature and frameworks into a comprehensive and consistent typology. Moreover, this integrative typology allows managers and researchers to identify those capabilities in use and the commonalities between them. Finally, the paper identifies a new knowledge‐based dynamic capability that has not yet been identified in any existing framework.

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Article
Publication date: 25 October 2011

Gregorio Martín‐de Castro, Pedro López‐Sáez and Miriam Delgado‐Verde

The purpose of this guest editorial is to highlight the importance of knowledge management and organizational learning in firm innovation, offering an integrative

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this guest editorial is to highlight the importance of knowledge management and organizational learning in firm innovation, offering an integrative framework to understand this complex business phenomenon.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on the literature review, the guest editorial shows a general review on “A Knowledge‐Based View of Firm Innovation” articulating and integrating a total number of ten theoretical and empirical contributions about this topic.

Findings

Theoretical and empirical works are organized in three main topics. The first one refers to the importance of external knowledge, networking, and relationships as key drivers of firm technological innovation, offering an “open or relational innovation framework”. The second one shows several papers on the growing importance of KIBS (Knowledge‐Intensive Business Services) in a Knowledge Economy and Society. Finally, this general review integrates papers about organizational context, and its role on knowledge management and firm innovation.

Research limitations/implications

The paper and special issue tries to offer some new relevant advances for the academic community in the growing body of knowledge management and firm innovation. Nevertheless, due to its special issue nature, the theoretical and empirical advances showed on it represent only a partial view of a “Knowledge‐Based View of Firm Innovation”.

Practical implications

Managers need to understand the precise nature and sources (internals and externals) of firm innovation. In this vein, this journal number shows empirical research developed in different countries and industries illustrating some interesting insights about this complex business phenomenon.

Originality/value

This general review shows new lines of theoretical and empirical research regarding knowledge management, organizational learning, and firm innovation in a useful integrative framework: “A Knowledge‐Based View of Firm Innovation”

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2011

Lidia Galabova and Guy Ahonen

The purpose of this paper is to construct a strategy model based on Intellectual Capital (IC) theory and to demonstrate that it is not purely resource‐based (RBV), but…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to construct a strategy model based on Intellectual Capital (IC) theory and to demonstrate that it is not purely resource‐based (RBV), but includes many elements that are rooted in the market based view (MBV). The authors' analysis indicates that only strategies which lead to both tangible and intangible revenues are sustainable in a knowledge‐based economy.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper takes the form of an extensive review of IC and strategy literature, and in‐depth comparative analysis of IC concept and the strategy management frameworks, particularly Porter's framework.

Findings

It is found that the IC‐based view (ICBV) is much closer to the MBV than what one would expect and the ICBV is more appropriate for a knowledge‐based economy than both the MBV and the RBV in general.

Originality/value

It is widely assumed that IC theory is strongly related to resource‐based strategy. The authors question this simple view and maintain that the IC‐based view relates to both MBV and RBV.

Details

Journal of Human Resource Costing & Accounting, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1401-338X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1997

Masudul Alam Choudhury and Hanapi Mohammad Noor

Carries out a statistical and economic analysis of socio‐economic survey results on the Mi’kmaq People of Cape Breton in the light of the criterion of the social wellbeing…

Abstract

Carries out a statistical and economic analysis of socio‐economic survey results on the Mi’kmaq People of Cape Breton in the light of the criterion of the social wellbeing function. Focuses on studying the social wellbeing criterion with the socio‐economic variables involved in the surveys in a relational perspective among alternatives. Points out that this approach is distinct from the neoclassical resource substitution method. Instead, the relational perspective is shown to be premissed on a system of universal complementarities.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 24 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 7 December 2018

Rayees Farooq

Knowledge management is a function of learning orientation, knowledge sharing, organizational memory and knowledge reuse. This paper aims to endeavor to explore a link…

Abstract

Purpose

Knowledge management is a function of learning orientation, knowledge sharing, organizational memory and knowledge reuse. This paper aims to endeavor to explore a link between knowledge management and value creation which seem to be fragmented in the literature due to various conceptualizations and meanings. The study hypothesized a moderating role of social capital on the relationship between knowledge management and value creation.

Design/methodology/approach

The study was approached from the theoretical perspective. Study thoroughly reviews and analyzes the literature by developing a link between knowledge management and value creation. The studies were explored from selected databases including “Google scholar”, “Emerald” and “ProQuest” using the keyword search, namely, “Knowledge Sharing”, “Learning Orientation”, “Organizational Memory”, “Knowledge Re-use”, “Knowledge Management”, “Knowledge-based View”, “Competitive Advantage”, “Value Creation” and “Social Capital” to reduce the interpretation bias.

Findings

Knowledge management is an important predictor of value creation which can be strengthened by developing strong interpersonal relationships with all stakeholders. Organizations can create competitive advantage by managing social capital through knowledge management processes including learning orientation, knowledge sharing, organizational memory and knowledge reuse.

Research limitations/implications

The study is based on a theoretical model and an apparent limitation is the non-existence here of contributions and discussions that have been based on empirical data. Future study may use other moderating and mediating variables such as industry type, market orientation, human capital and organizational climate to know whether knowledge management directly affects the value creation or indirectly through these variables. The hypotheses emerged from the model can be operationalized by generating the items from the review of the literature.

Originality/value

The study contributes to the knowledge management literature by developing a theoretical model of knowledge management based on underlying dimensions of learning orientation, knowledge sharing, organizational memory and knowledge re-use.

Details

International Journal of Innovation Science, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-2223

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 18 September 2006

Susan E. Jackson, Chih-Hsun Chuang, Erika E. Harden and Yuan Jiang

Building on the resource-based view of the firm and complex systems theory, we argue that the effective utilization of knowledge-intensive teamwork (KITwork) can be a…

Abstract

Building on the resource-based view of the firm and complex systems theory, we argue that the effective utilization of knowledge-intensive teamwork (KITwork) can be a source of sustained competitive advantage for firms that pursue a variety of strategies and compete in a variety of industries. KITwork is a multi-dimensional, multi-level social process that promotes knowledge flows within and between organizations. Through KITwork, the knowledge resources of individual employees are transformed into a capability that contributes to the effectiveness of knowledge-based organizations. After introducing and explaining the concept of KITwork, we explore the challenges that organizations must address in order to design HRM systems that support and facilitate KITwork.

Details

Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-426-3

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2021

Yu Wang, Hongyi Sun, Tao Jia and Jinliang Chen

This study is based on knowledge-based view to examine the relationships among buyer–supplier interaction, ambidextrous innovation and business performance. It includes…

Abstract

Purpose

This study is based on knowledge-based view to examine the relationships among buyer–supplier interaction, ambidextrous innovation and business performance. It includes competitive intensity and dysfunctional competition to clarify boundary conditions.

Design/methodology/approach

The ordinary least squares regression was conducted to test hypotheses. The survey data were collected from 182 Hong Kong manufacturing firms.

Findings

Buyer–supplier interaction facilitates ambidextrous innovation, namely exploitative innovation and exploratory innovation. In turn, exploitative innovation enhances business performance, whereas exploratory innovation has no influence on business performance. Competitive intensity strengthens while dysfunctional competition weakens the impact of buyer–supplier interaction on ambidextrous innovation.

Research limitations/implications

This study is based on the knowing processes of knowledge-based view. It contends that business performance is derived from ambidextrous innovation, which depends on the utilization of acquired supplier knowledge and the influence of external competitive environment. The test of relationships is constrained by the single-source and cross-sectional data.

Practical implications

Firms should engage in buyer–supplier interaction to acquire and utilize supplier knowledge. Meanwhile, they should monitor competitive environment to seize opportunities and avoid threats.

Originality/value

This study builds a holistic framework for buyer–supplier interaction, which reconciles the mixed arguments by distinguishing its effects on ambidextrous innovation, and by clarifying boundary conditions in terms of competitive intensity and dysfunctional competition.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 32 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 1 August 2004

N Venkatraman and Hüseyin Tanriverdi

Strategy researchers have become fascinated with the possibilities for developing theoretical perspectives rooted in knowledge and intellectual assets as drivers of…

Abstract

Strategy researchers have become fascinated with the possibilities for developing theoretical perspectives rooted in knowledge and intellectual assets as drivers of superior performance. However, there have been many different schools of thought, each with its own conceptualization lenses and operationalization approaches. In this chapter, we focus on three schools of thought: (1) knowledge as stocks; (2) knowledge as flow; and (3) knowledge as a driver of an organizational capability. We use them to: (a) lay out the distinct approaches to conceptualization and operationalization of strategy-related concepts; and (b) identify specific ways to enhance theory-method correspondence. We believe that considerable progress could be made towards developing a knowledge-based view of strategy but only when accompanied by serious attention to measurement and methodological issues.

Details

Research Methodology in Strategy and Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-235-1

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Article
Publication date: 23 December 2020

Jin Chen, Luyao Wang and Guannan Qu

The purpose of this paper is to conceptualize the business model (BM) from a knowledge-based view (KBV), to interpret its nature and knowledge structure and to investigate…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to conceptualize the business model (BM) from a knowledge-based view (KBV), to interpret its nature and knowledge structure and to investigate the relationship between its imitability and the erosion of firm’s competitive advantage.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on a systematic literature review, this study builds an integrated framework to explicate the nature and structure of the BM from a KBV. Moreover, on the analysis of two contrasting cases, the argument concerning the relationship between BM imitability and its strategic value is proposed, analyzed and supported.

Findings

The main finding of this study is that a BM can be viewed as a structured knowledge cluster that contains explicit and implicit parts. Its imitation is a dynamic process of knowledge diffusion across firm boundaries. Ceteris paribus, with a lower proportion of implicit knowledge, a BM is more likely to be imitated and the adopter’s competitive advantage is more likely to be eroded, and vice versa.

Practical implications

The proposed framework could provide managers with a deeper understanding of the nature and structure of the BM and help potential adopters develop a successful entry strategy by avoiding BMs that seem profitable but are incapable of maintaining competitive advantage.

Originality/value

As a complement to previous studies, the research conceptualizes the BM as a “structured knowledge cluster” to explicate its nature and knowledge structure from a KBV. The implicit part of the BM is explored, and its importance for the adopter’s competitive advantage is discussed and verified.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2004

Bernard Marr and J.‐C. Spender

The business world has enthusiastically adopted the idea that knowledge has become the most strategic of corporate assets, the principal basis for competitive advantage…

Abstract

The business world has enthusiastically adopted the idea that knowledge has become the most strategic of corporate assets, the principal basis for competitive advantage. This enthusiasm has not, however, been matched by an understanding of how to operationalize knowledge. It seems we argue that knowledge is important largely because it is a different kind of asset. While this is perplexing and suggests that it is important to understand the strategic significance of the different kinds of organizational knowledge, it also raises operational issues for managers. How are they to identify knowledge assets, and measure them? We offer tentative proposals for a new approach to assets evaluation.

Details

Measuring Business Excellence, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1368-3047

Keywords

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