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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2020

Renee Hall, Lorna Moxham, Dana Perlman and Amy Tapsell

The experiences of clinical facilitators working within non-conventional mental health settings have not yet been explored. The purpose of this paper is to explore the…

Abstract

Purpose

The experiences of clinical facilitators working within non-conventional mental health settings have not yet been explored. The purpose of this paper is to explore the experiences of clinical facilitators when facilitating nursing student learning within a non-conventional mental health clinical placement.

Design/methodology/approach

This study adopted a qualitative phenomenological approach. The participants in this study were five registered nurses who had facilitated students at a non-conventional mental health clinical placement called Recovery Camp. Individual in-depth interviews were conducted.

Findings

The facilitators experiences could be understood through two main themes: facilitator skills and opportunities for student learning. Recovery Camp allowed the facilitators to build on their own nursing and facilitation skills, while examining themselves as a mental health nurse. “Being with” students (immersive engagement) enabled opportunistic and rare learning moments.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first known study to explore the experiences of clinical facilitators working in a non-conventional mental health placement.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

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Article
Publication date: 6 May 2014

Irram Walji, Ian Fletcher and Stephen Weatherhead

– The purpose of this paper is to present an exploration of the experiences of clinical psychologists involved in implementing the Mental Capacity Act (MCA).

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present an exploration of the experiences of clinical psychologists involved in implementing the Mental Capacity Act (MCA).

Design/methodology/approach

Seven clinical psychologists were interviewed and transcripts were analysed using thematic analysis.

Findings

Six themes were identified: competence and confidence; understanding and uncertainty; colleagues, collaboration, conflicts, and challenges; working within the law: processes and penalties; the psychological way: specialist skills and difficult decision-making; and power, principles, and protecting the person. The themes highlighted how the specialist skills and professional values of clinical psychologists enhanced their ability to maintain person-centred approaches and uphold the empowering principles underlying the MCA. Data analysis indicated a shared narrative among clinical psychologists involved in implementing the MCA, despite differences in client groups and contexts.

Practical implications

This research highlighted the importance of finding solutions to current problems with the implementation of the MCA, such as training gaps and misunderstanding of the Act in relation to some of its complexities (e.g. deprivation of liberty safeguards and best interests decisions). These areas have the potential to significantly impact on a person's wellbeing. There is an ongoing need for training, multidisciplinary working, and strong effective supervision with ongoing reflexivity, if the Act is to be implemented in the holistic person-centred manner that are the foundations on which it was developed.

Originality/value

This research identifies the important role clinical psychologists have to play in this process. Their specialist skills can encourage a person-centred approach to the implementation of the MCA.

Details

Social Care and Neurodisability, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-0919

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Book part
Publication date: 23 June 2020

Michelle Veyvoda, Thomas J. Van Cleave and Laurette Olson

This chapter draws from the authors’ experiences with service-learning pedagogy in allied health training programs, and illustrates ways in which community-engaged…

Abstract

This chapter draws from the authors’ experiences with service-learning pedagogy in allied health training programs, and illustrates ways in which community-engaged teaching and learning can prepare students to become ethical healthcare practitioners. The authors infuse examples from their own courses throughout the chapter, mostly from the clinical fields of speech-language pathology, audiology, and occupational therapy. However, the chapter is applicable and generalizable to faculty from a wide scope of allied health training programs. The chapter introduces considerations for establishing campus–community partnerships in an ethical manner, as well as ways to foster student self-reflection and critical thinking through an ethical lens. Principles from the codes of ethics of various allied health professions are incorporated throughout the chapter along with examples of how each can be applied in community-based clinical experiences. Through a review of relevant literature, analysis of professional codes of ethics, case-based examples, and a step-by-step guide to course development, this chapter provides readers with a mechanism to ground their courses in professional ethics in a way that is relatable and relevant to students.

Details

Civil Society and Social Responsibility in Higher Education: International Perspectives on Curriculum and Teaching Development
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-464-4

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2005

Jerry Hallier and Tom Forbes

Aims to illustrate how the use of a social identity approach can help to refine our understanding of how organizational professionals experience the introduction of…

Abstract

Purpose

Aims to illustrate how the use of a social identity approach can help to refine our understanding of how organizational professionals experience the introduction of managerialism and the incorporation of managing specialist roles.

Design/methodology/approach

Draws on theories of social identity and social categorization to examine the process by which clinical directors tackle and assign meaning to their managing roles. Interviews were conducted with a sample of current and previous clinical directors over a five year period. Variations in doctors’ responses were explained by a range of self enhancement strategies that emerged to deal with tensions between prepared management identities and actual role experiences.

Findings

Reveals the importance of multiple self‐enhancement strategies as a way for doctors to protect self definitions in failing identity situations where immediate exit from a new role is not feasible. Concludes that a greater use of social identity and social categorization theory may add much to general explanations of how varied stances towards management interventions emerge and develop among professional workers.

Originality/value

Points to how we might achieve a deeper understanding of the diverse ways that the organizational professionals experience the introduction of managerialism and the incorporation of managing the specialist roles.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

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Article
Publication date: 29 November 2013

Nicola Murphy, Andrew Vidgen, Clare Sandford and Steve Onyett

There has been a rapid development and implementation of crisis resolution home treatment teams (CRHTT) in the UK over the past decade. The available research studies of…

Abstract

Purpose

There has been a rapid development and implementation of crisis resolution home treatment teams (CRHTT) in the UK over the past decade. The available research studies of this service provision to date have largely focused on issues related to the “outputs” of CRHTT, for example cost efficacy and the impact on admission rates. There is limited research on the experiences of clinical psychologists within CRHTT. This is despite the fact that it would seem that research exploring the experiences of mental health professionals in CRHTT is important, as working in a new area of service provision may present specific challenges. An understanding of the nature of these challenges is considered important in order to support clinical psychologists in these settings, and to sustain and improve service delivery.

Design/methodology/approach

–This study presents a qualitative exploration of clinical psychologists’ experiences of working in a CRHTT. In total, 11 clinical psychologists were interviewed about their perceptions of working within CRHTT, their relationships with other professionals and their experiences of working with service users in “crisis”. The grounded theory approach was employed to analyse participants’ accounts.

Findings

–Two themes were identified: psychological and clinical work and teamwork. The emergent themes are compared to the wider literature on clinical psychologists’ experiences of working in teams, and working with service users in “crisis”.

Originality/value

This research demonstrates the value of a clinical psychology perspective in acute mental health settings. It also highlights the value of a clinical psychological perspective in multi-disciplinary team working. It draws attention to the need for clinical psychologists working in CRHTT settings to be able to more clearly articulate their roles in these services. It points to the importance of clinical psychologists considering the interventions they provide to service users with complex presentations. Also, it highlights their need to consider the psychological interventions they provide in CRHTT settings more generally, as this area of work does not closely align with NICE guidelines.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

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Article
Publication date: 4 January 2021

Simon Levinson, Pieter Willem Nel and Louise-Margaret Conlan

There is a gap in the literature regarding the experiences of newly qualified Clinical Psychologists (NQCPs) working within Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services…

Abstract

Purpose

There is a gap in the literature regarding the experiences of newly qualified Clinical Psychologists (NQCPs) working within Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services (CAMHS) in the National Health Service (NHS). This paper aims to explore three aspects of newly qualified Clinical Psychologists’ experiences: their transition and development; working in multi-disciplinary teams located in large organisations; and support and coping in the role.

Design/methodology/approach

Seven participants each engaged in one semi-structured interview, and an interpretative phenomenological analysis was conducted.

Findings

Three super-ordinate themes emerged from the analysis: A big jump, the transition from trainee to NQCP; The support of home comforts, old and new; and Acknowledging and desiring ongoing development.

Originality/value

Implications and recommendations for both Clinical Psychology training programmes and NHS employers are discussed, to support the development and wellbeing of this staff group, and in turn the clinical population they serve. These include gradually increasing caseloads on training, a staggered workload at the outset of the transition, and CAMHS teams ensuring appropriate supervision for NQCPs.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 16 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

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Article
Publication date: 15 February 2013

Katri Manninen, Elisabet Welin Henriksson, Max Scheja and Charlotte Silén

This study aims to explore and understand first year nursing students’ experiences of learning at a clinical education ward.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore and understand first year nursing students’ experiences of learning at a clinical education ward.

Design/methodology/approach

The setting is a clinical education ward for nursing students at a department of infectious diseases. A qualitative study was carried out exploring students’ encounters with patients, supervisors, students and other health care professionals. A total of 19 students were interviewed. Data were analyzed using qualitative content analysis investigating both the manifest and the latent content.

Findings

The most important components in students’ learning are mutual relationships and a sense of belongingness. A mutual relationship between the students and the patients is created and becomes the basis of students’ learning. Belongingness means the students’ experience of being for real a part of the team taking care of the patients.

Research limitations/implications

The study, while linked to a particular teaching hospital, offers insights of more general nature by linking the findings to a theory of transformative learning.

Originality/value

This study adds a deeper understanding of students’ perspectives of significant characteristics to take into account when organizing clinical practice in health care education. Being entrusted and supported by a team of supervisors to take care of patients at a clinical education ward early in the education program provides an experience of internal and external authenticity. The students learn from, with and through the patients, which contributes to meaningful learning, understanding nursing, and professional development.

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Article
Publication date: 19 April 2011

Mark Hecimovich and Simone Volet

The purpose of this paper is to review critically the published research investigating how guided practice into the profession contributes to increased professional…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review critically the published research investigating how guided practice into the profession contributes to increased professional confidence in health care students, with a view to identifying its impact on the development of professional confidence.

Design/methodology/approach

A literature search was performed using MEDLINE and ERIC (1980‐2009), which identified guided practice into the profession as being the most commonly examined educational opportunity increasing professional confidence. Empirical studies that had rigorous research design and methods were selected for in‐depth review. However, in light of the paucity of the extant research, a few studies reporting anecdotal accounts of the development of professional confidence through guided practice were also included.

Findings

The review revealed how guided practice into the profession can contribute significantly to students' development of professional confidence. The review also points to arguable relationships between confidence and competence and the importance of better understanding and addressing the issue of under‐ and over‐confidence. The review highlights when evidence of the effectiveness of learning opportunities was insufficient or unreliable, with some directions for future research.

Research limitations/implications

The review was based on a selection of papers most representative of research examining the effectiveness of guided professional practice learning opportunities to promote the development of professional confidence, and therefore is not a systematic review of all the extant literature.

Originality/value

It provides insight into the conditions under which guided practice into the profession can contribute to enhancing professional confidence, which is important, given the nature of its relationship with professional competence.

Details

Health Education, vol. 111 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

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Article
Publication date: 30 August 2011

William Kernan, Jane Bogart and Mary E. Wheat

The purpose of this paper is to report the perceived impact of various health concerns on the academic performance of health sciences graduate students.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report the perceived impact of various health concerns on the academic performance of health sciences graduate students.

Design/methodology/approach

The American College Health Association's National College Health Assessment (ACHA‐NCHA), a 58‐item anonymous survey, was distributed to all graduate health science students during a five‐week period in the spring semester.

Findings

Students (n=1,355) were most likely to report a negative perceived academic impact related to psychosocial concerns such as stress, depression/anxiety, and relationship problems. The students' most pressing felt concerns were upper respiratory infections, stress, concerns about troubled loved ones and sleep difficulties. Clinical graduate students (n=712) were significantly more likely to report negative academic impacts related to upper respiratory infections (p=0.001), concern about a troubled friend or family member (p=0.001), sleep difficulties (p=0.005), relationship difficulties (p=0.030), and internet use/computer games (p=0.015) than non‐clinical graduate students. However, the magnitude of those differences was small.

Practical implications

This paper adds to one's knowledge of student health concerns, which may help to address health‐related barriers to learning.

Originality/value

This paper presents findings that further explicate the reciprocal relationship between student health and learning by suggesting methodology to identify priority health issues among a graduate student population. Findings from this study of over 20 different health concerns indicate that the priority health concerns of graduate health science students are primarily psychological and psychosocial health issues.

Details

Health Education, vol. 111 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

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Article
Publication date: 10 January 2020

Tobias Wasser, Saksham Chandra and Katherine Michaelsen

The purpose of this paper is to review the impact of a new, brief forensic rotation for general psychiatry residents on the variety of residents’ forensic exposures.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review the impact of a new, brief forensic rotation for general psychiatry residents on the variety of residents’ forensic exposures.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors surveyed residents who trained before and after the implementation of the new rotation to assess the impact of the rotation on the residents’ forensic experiences during training across a variety of domains.

Findings

Even in a highly clinical forensic setting, residents participating in the required rotation reported significantly greater variety of forensic experiences than those who had not completed the required rotation, including types of settings and assessments, Rotation completers reported greater exposure to various types of settings and assessments, and courtroom-related experiences, as well as the overall number of forensic exposures. The two groups did not differ in their forensic exposures in general psychiatry settings, civil-forensic evaluations or diverse forensic populations. Secondary analyses showed that increased exposure to court-based experiences and multiple forensic settings was associated with forensic fellowship interest.

Originality/value

This study demonstrates that a brief, mandatory forensic clinical rotation may increase residents’ exposure to forensic settings, assessments and courtroom-related experiences and that increased exposure to courtroom-based experiences in particular may increase interest in forensic fellowship. While not surprising, the results demonstrate that residents were not otherwise having these forensic experiences and that even time-limited forensic rotations can enhance the breadth of residents’ forensic exposures. Further, the rotation achieved these outcomes without using typical forensic sites but instead highly clinical sites, which may be particularly encouraging to residency programs without ready access to classic forensic rotation sites. This study contributes to the small but expanding body of the literature describing the value of increasing psychiatry residents’ training in clinical forensic psychiatry.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

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