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Article
Publication date: 26 April 2022

Gülsüm Ançel, Yasemin Çekiç and Şahinde Canbulat

Students have an opportunity to integrate their theoretical knowledge into practice, develop skills to provide quality nursing care and gain clinical experience by using…

Abstract

Purpose

Students have an opportunity to integrate their theoretical knowledge into practice, develop skills to provide quality nursing care and gain clinical experience by using care plans. For this reason, it is important and necessary to identify students’ feelings, opinions and behaviors regarding care plans. This study aims to evaluate students’ opinions about working with a care plan to develop a realistic practice and achievable goals in clinical training of mental health nursing education.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 90 senior nursing students were enrolled in this study, and data were collected from 63 students who received informed consent. In the data collection, a structured “Learning-Teaching Process Assessment Form” which consists of two parts created by the researchers in accordance with the qualitative research model was applied at the end of training period. The data were analyzed manually by researchers with “thematic analysis” method.

Findings

The analysis of data revealed three categories and ten themes. More than half of the students stated that they were not satisfied with the care plan, but they found working with a care plan as realistic, whereas the majority of them found it difficult planning a care plan, but found it beneficial to working with the care plan.

Originality/value

This study results show that different strategies are needed for students to implement nursing process effectively.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 January 2022

Rabia S. Allari, Khaldoun Hamdan, Maha Alkaid Albqoor and Abeer Shaheen

To describe the perceived level of information competency among nursing students in Jordan.

Abstract

Purpose

To describe the perceived level of information competency among nursing students in Jordan.

Design/methodology/approach

Cross sectional-correlational design was utilized. Data were collected using an electronic self-administered questionnaire from graduate and undergraduate nursing students in Jordan.

Findings

Nursing students showed a moderate mean total score of information competency (184.11 out of 280, SD = 22.92). Among information competency subscales, using the information technologies subscale had the highest mean score, while information from the mass media subscale had the lowest mean score. Information competency of nursing students was positively correlated with students' age. Significant differences were found in information competency according to the academic level, addressing scientific research and research in databases in the course of the study, frequency of meeting the supervisor to discuss the research and university sector.

Originality/value

Although there are numerous studies worldwide that assessed nursing students' information literacy, this paper represents the first study of information literacy competencies among nursing students in Jordan. While the content supports conclusions that have been drawn from other studies, this study is novel in terms of the student population it addressed. Information competency among nursing students can be improved by integrating standard research and information competency courses at the undergraduate level and involving mass media platforms in the nursing education curricula.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 50 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 23 June 2020

Kechinyere C. Iheduru-Anderson and Monika M. Wahi

This chapter proposes a global agenda to eliminate racism in nursing by targeting reform at nursing education administration internationally. First, the history of racism…

Abstract

This chapter proposes a global agenda to eliminate racism in nursing by targeting reform at nursing education administration internationally. First, the history of racism in nursing is reviewed, along with two models – the diversity model and the cultural competence model – that were applied unsuccessfully to counteract racism in nursing. Second, a description of how racism is entrenched in nursing leadership globally is presented. Third, the recalcitrant structures that serve to maintain institutionalized racism (IR) in the international nursing education system are carefully examined. Specifically, the components and constructs involved in IR in nursing education are delineated, and the way in which these negatively impact both ethnic minority (EM) students and faculty are explained. Based on this, a global agenda to eliminate racism in nursing education internationally is proposed. Eliminating racism in higher education in nursing is a mandatory social responsibility if global healthcare is ever to be equitable. Five actionable recommendations are made to eliminate racism in higher education are summarized as follows: (1) components of nursing programs which are designed to eliminate racism in nursing education should be governed at the country level, (2) to design and implement a system of surveillance of the global nursing community to enable standardized measurement to ensure nursing education programs in all countries are meeting anti-racism benchmark targets, (3) nursing education programs should be established worldwide to provide individual pipeline and mentorship programs to ensure the career success of EM nursing students and faculty, (4) nursing education programs should be conducted to reduce barriers to EM participation in these individual support programs, and (5) nursing education programs are required to teach their nursing faculty skills in developing anti-racist curricula that seeks to eliminate implicit bias.

Details

Civil Society and Social Responsibility in Higher Education: International Perspectives on Curriculum and Teaching Development
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-464-4

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 26 July 2021

Peace Njideka Iheanacho, Chisom Joy Mbadugha, Chinenye Juliet Anetekhai, Chinenye Ifeoma Ubah, Adaobi Lilian Obiekwu and Nonye Anne Chukwujama

Human right is a phenomenon universal to all but greatly significant for disadvantaged groups like people with mental illness who due to the limitations of their illness…

Abstract

Purpose

Human right is a phenomenon universal to all but greatly significant for disadvantaged groups like people with mental illness who due to the limitations of their illness cannot assert their rights. This study aims to assess the knowledge and attitude of nursing students regarding the human rights of people with mental illness.

Design/methodology/approach

A descriptive study was conducted among 72 nursing students purposively selected from two nursing schools in Enugu, Nigeria. Data were collected using a 38 item literature-based questionnaire developed by the researchers. The reliability of the instrument was established using Cronbach’s alpha model with 0.812 coefficients.

Findings

Participants 32 (44.4%) demonstrated moderate knowledge regarding the human rights of people with mental illness. The attitude of nursing students towards the right of people with mental illness was positive (2.81). There is no significant difference in knowledge between students of the two schools, p = 0.199 (>0.05). However, the study showed that students from basic nursing school had a more favourable attitude towards the rights of people with mental illness compared to the post-basic nursing students, p = 0.050 (<0.05).

Originality/value

The rising incidence of human right violation in mental health practice indicates the need to assess the knowledge and attitude of the future workforce who play a critical role in the care and management of people with mental illness. The nursing curriculum should provide nursing students in their various institutions of training, sufficient information on the human rights of people with mental illness. Also, a legal structure in Nigeria for people with mental illness is imperative to protect them from gross human rights violations.

Details

International Journal of Human Rights in Healthcare, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4902

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 June 2021

Jaime A. Hannans, Colleen M. Nevins and Kristin Jordan

The aim of the study was to explore aspects of learning in terms of gain in knowledge, confidence and empathy with immersive virtual reality (VR) from the patient…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of the study was to explore aspects of learning in terms of gain in knowledge, confidence and empathy with immersive virtual reality (VR) from the patient perspective in undergraduate nursing students.

Design/methodology/approach

A pilot study integrating immersive VR experiences during clinical courses was facilitated based on the INACSL (2016) standards for simulation practices with a convenience sample of 165 nursing students in three levels of cohorts, using two different VR scenario simulations. Quantitative and qualitative data were collected through pre- and post-surveys.

Findings

Student participants embodied patients with chronic disease using immersive VR. Findings showed substantial gains in most measures of knowledge, confidence and empathy, with slightly less difference seen in lower level nursing students particularly with empathy and understanding.

Research limitations/implications

Embodiment through immersive VR scenarios was shown to increase learner development. The positive findings from the pilot study justified continuance of integration of immersive VR in nursing education, recommending further use and research.

Originality/value

Simulated learning for nursing has known benefits on knowledge and understanding. Immersive VR is gaining recognition within nursing education as a method to enhance cognitive and affective knowledge. This paper hopes to add insights on the impact of immersive VR for student learning and encourage discussion about the future for innovative immersive teaching and learning approaches for experiential learning.

Article
Publication date: 31 December 2020

Christine S. Gipson, Julie A. Delello and Rochell R. McWhorter

The purpose of this study is to examine nursing students’ (n = 18) perceptions of interrelating with older adults to understand how such interactions might improve students

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine nursing students’ (n = 18) perceptions of interrelating with older adults to understand how such interactions might improve students’ levels of cultural competence and enhance their future nursing practice. Additionally, the study sought to contribute to a higher level of technological competency in older adults.

Design/methodology/approach

A basic qualitative study design (Merriam and Tisdell, 2016) was used to direct the data collection and analysis to achieve the aims of this study.

Findings

Four themes emerged from the data collected based on cultural knowledge, cultural skills, cultural desire and engaging in cross-cultural interactions. Students reflected on how their experiences would help them to interact with older adults in their future nursing practices.

Research limitations/implications

The limitation of the research is that the exploratory study cannot be generalized for a wider demographic. Also, the students’ prior experiences working with older adults were not considered and their reflections may not have accurately portrayed their true biases.

Practical implications

Reflection is a valuable practice to help students think through their experiences and is considered a key component of service-learning. In this study, students reflected on how their experiences would help them to interact with older adults in their future nursing practices.

Social implications

Nursing students who are later used take with them empathy, more sensitivity and positive attitudes toward older people to benefit the nurse-patient relationship with this population.

Originality/value

This is one of a handful of studies located that pairs nursing students with older people in teaching technology skills through iPad technology.

Details

Working with Older People, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-3666

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 31 March 2021

Paul Ratanasiripong, Chiachih DC Wang, Nop Ratanasiripong, Suda Hanklang, Duangrat Kathalae and Pornlert Chumchai

The purpose of this study is to investigate the psychosocial factors that impact the academic performance of nursing students.

1498

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate the psychosocial factors that impact the academic performance of nursing students.

Design/methodology/approach

A cross-sectional study was conducted with 767 nursing students from three nursing colleges in Thailand. Instruments included Counseling Center Assessment for Psychological Symptoms and Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale. Path model analyses with the maximum likelihood method were utilized to examine the proposed model. Model fit was estimated using multiple indexes, including chi-square/df ratio (χ2/df), comparative fit index (CFI), Tucker-Lewis index (TLI) and the root mean square error of approximation (RMSEA).

Findings

Results indicated that family distress, emotional negativity, self-esteem and substance use were factors that related to nursing students' academic performance. Findings of path analyses indicated that the model demonstrated good fit: χ2 (2, N = 767) = 3.11, p = 0.48; χ2/df = 1.56; CFI = 1.00; TLI = 0.99; RMSEA = 0.027, (90% CI = [0.000, 0.082], PCLOSE = 0.68).

Originality/value

While prior research has examined some facets leading to academic success for nursing students, psychosocial factors have not received adequate attention. This study presents a model of family and individual psychosocial factors that impact academic performance of nursing students along with recommendations to help improve their well-being.

Details

Journal of Health Research, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0857-4421

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 May 2018

Steven Jacobs

The purpose of this paper is threefold. First, this paper documents an analysis of mentorship models within the profession of nursing from the 1940s onward. From this…

2079

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is threefold. First, this paper documents an analysis of mentorship models within the profession of nursing from the 1940s onward. From this analysis, the author was able to categorize the evolution of mentorship models within nursing. Second, this paper identifies four specific contemporary challenges within nursing which relate directly to mentorship. Last, this paper attempts to place a nursing student peer mentorship model in context to best understand how it can benefit the profession of nursing and help address the four identified contemporary challenges within nursing.

Design/methodology/approach

The theoretical, philosophical, and research roots that have shaped and informed mentorship models in nursing are examined. The strengths and limitations of nursing mentorship models are analyzed in relation to contemporary challenges in nursing education and practice with a focus on undergraduate peer mentorship. This was achieved through a comprehensive literature review that examined mentorship in nursing from approximately 1940 to the present.

Findings

Since Nightingale’s time, five specific mentoring models have been created and adapted within the nursing profession. The five mentorship models identified within this paper are most prevalent within current and previous nursing mentorship literature and demonstrate how models within nursing have evolved from those positing a relatively paternalistic relationship to those favoring more collaborative and reciprocal relations between mentor and mentee. Further, it is argued in this paper that a nursing student peer mentorship model can assist in addressing four challenges which currently face the profession of nursing. These four challenges (which are prevalent in nursing literature) are mentoring as a professional responsibility, projected nursing shortages, communication in nursing, and the development of critical thinking skills.

Research limitations/implications

A limitation of this paper includes the fact that, despite the many challenges facing the profession of nursing today, this paper focuses on only four identified challenges. As it is impossible for one paper to address all of the contemporary challenges which face nursing today, as articulated below, this paper addresses four identified challenges because they relate to mentorship, nursing education, and nursing practice.

Practical implications

Providing opportunities for nursing students to participate in a peer mentoring relationship assists future nurses and the profession as a whole by generating tangible benefits. These benefits include an exposure to theories and models of mentorship and skills to help them fulfill their future professional responsibility of mentoring, development of relationships and skills that can increase both nurse and student retention, and improved communication and critical thinking skills. Last, this study can help nursing schools to identify and work with theories and models of mentorship that will improve their ability to stimulate critical thinking among their students.

Originality/value

This paper fills a gap in the literature by providing an analysis of the theoretical, philosophical, and research roots that have shaped and informed mentorship models in nursing from the 1940s onward. This analysis suggests that student peer mentorship may be the most effective model to address these four challenges in nursing: mentoring as a professional responsibility, projected nursing shortages, communication in nursing, and the development of critical thinking skills. This paper has the potential to make a timely contribution to the global debate regarding mentoring across the healthcare professions.

Details

International Journal of Mentoring and Coaching in Education, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6854

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 15 April 2019

Vasanthrie Naidoo and Maureen Nokuthula Sibiya

The purpose of this paper is to share insights, research findings and discuss key issues related to graduate experiences with transnational nursing education (TNE).

1361

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to share insights, research findings and discuss key issues related to graduate experiences with transnational nursing education (TNE).

Design/methodology/approach

The authors used a qualitative approach and sampled national and international nurse graduates to identify challenges and best operating practices in cross-border nursing program facilitation.

Findings

This research paper has provided a platform for graduates to lend their voices to the promotion of effective cross-border nursing education delivery and suggests that although international collaborations endeavor to maintain high academic standards in TNE, there is still a need to re-engineer, revise and adapt curricular content, learning, teaching and assessment practices to aid the nursing student.

Research limitations/implications

Identified challenges affecting the facilitation and delivery of cross-border nursing education programs can act as levers to improving service quality of present and future cross-border programs to the nursing student. This will assist future nursing students to recognize culture shock and embrace their decision to pursue nursing.

Practical implications

The experience of being involved in TNE for nursing students may not be that much different than students of other disciplines. While not able to be generalized to the entire population, the reports by the nursing students in this sample appear to be valuable and worthwhile to continue supporting and encouraging other TNE opportunities.

Originality/value

This paper explores cross-border nursing education experiences from national and international perspectives. The authors were able to explore inherent TNE challenges from diverse population and cultural backgrounds.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 32 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

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