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Article
Publication date: 8 January 2018

Yu-Qian Zhu, Holly Chiu and Eduardo Jorge Infante Holguin-Veras

This study aims to debunk the myth that knowledge sharing will harm one’s competiveness, and argues, from the learning theory perspective, that sharing knowledge benefits both…

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Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to debunk the myth that knowledge sharing will harm one’s competiveness, and argues, from the learning theory perspective, that sharing knowledge benefits both knowledge sharers and knowledge recipients.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey data were collected from 233 respondents across a variety of industries in Taiwan and the data were analyzed using Partial Least Squares analysis.

Findings

The results showed that both knowledge sharers and knowledge recipients benefitted from knowledge sharing, developing deeper and wider knowledge, leading to better performance, and that the benefits were greater for the knowledge sharers.

Practical Implications

It is suggested that managers advocate knowledge sharing as a learning activity for both knowledge sharers and knowledge recipients. Regular knowledge sharing activities are advised, with knowledge sharers engaged fully in active learning, and knowledge recipients encouraged to take a more active role, by not only listening but also starting to share themselves.

Originality/value

This research adds to the knowledge management literature by investigating the results of knowledge sharing for both the sharer and recipient through a learning theory lens. It challenges the conventional view that employees will be worse off if they share knowledge, and debunks it with theoretical argument and empirical evidence. It offers insights into the impact on knowledge breadth and depth at the individual level, which was previously only studied at the organizational level.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 November 2022

Yu-Qian Zhu and Kritsapas Kanjanamekanant

Robotic process automation (RPA) has been widely implemented to automate digital tasks. The resulting new type of human–bot co-working environment, however, has been understudied…

Abstract

Purpose

Robotic process automation (RPA) has been widely implemented to automate digital tasks. The resulting new type of human–bot co-working environment, however, has been understudied. This paper investigated how the depth and breadth of RPA deployment impact employees' job autonomy and work intensification, as well as perceived RPA performance. It further examined how job autonomy, work intensification, and perceived RPA performance predict burnout and continuance intention to use RPA.

Design/methodology/approach

Using data collected from online survey of 128 RPA users, whose organizations have already gone live on RPA, partial least squares is used in the validation of the conceptual model and analysis.

Findings

The analytical results indicate that RPA deployment breadth and depth affect work intensification differently, and RPA deployment breadth and depth significantly predict perceived RPA performance. While work intensification increases burnout, job autonomy alleviates the burnout of employees. Finally, job autonomy and perceived RPA performance are both positive predictors of continuance intention to use RPA.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the literature by investigating how co-working affects employees' autonomy and quality of work. It also advances the research on technology deployment by showing how deployment breadth and depth differently affect employees' evaluations of work-related aspects. Third, it extends the applicability of job demand-resource model into technology deployment and continuance technology use literature, by illustrating the importance of a job resource such as job autonomy. Finally, it provides firms with RPA implementation strategies.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 123 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 August 2012

Yu‐Qian Zhu and Houn‐Gee Chen

The purpose of this paper is to explore and empirically test fairness in predicting online customer satisfaction in the internet banking context. The paper also aims to further…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore and empirically test fairness in predicting online customer satisfaction in the internet banking context. The paper also aims to further explore the mechanism through which fairness influences customer satisfaction online, i.e. identifying the mediators.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey is used to validate a research model based on equity theory and relationship marketing theory that incorporates fairness, trust, perceived value and customer satisfaction. A total of 331 surveys were analyzed using Partial Least Square.

Findings

In internet banking, fairness that includes distributive fairness, procedural fairness and informational fairness is positively related to customer satisfaction. Trust is identified as the key mediator of fairness to customer satisfaction.

Research limitations/implications

In an online context, where human interactions are replaced by graphic user interfaces, fairness still plays an important role in customer satisfaction. Further comparison of online and offline context could be conducted.

Practical implications

For online service managers, it is crucial to incorporate the fairness perspective into operations, which involves topics like segmented marketing efforts, consistency in procedures, and providing ample information to customers.

Originality/value

This research is one of the first attempts to examine fairness in internet banking, as well as to delineate the mediating process of fairness to satisfaction online.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 April 2023

Hafizah Omar Zaki, Dahlia Fernandez, Omkar Dastane, Aini Aman and Soliha Sanusi

This study unravels the intellectual structure of virtual reality (VR) in digital marketing (DM) research, identifies core research gaps and presents future research avenues. The…

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Abstract

Purpose

This study unravels the intellectual structure of virtual reality (VR) in digital marketing (DM) research, identifies core research gaps and presents future research avenues. The study also conducts a performance analysis of publications in the field and identifies the most important stakeholders of the stated topic.

Design/methodology/approach

The Web of Science database was used to retrieve the publications that were relevant to the topic between 2012 and 2022. Biblioshiny, a shiny app for the Bibliometrix R package, is used to conduct a bibliometric analysis by decoding the results into several visual representations.

Findings

This report includes the most prolific contributors, keyword analysis results, productive nations, authors and connections, as well as the most often cited publications on VR in DM. In DM research, numerous perspectives on VR were looked at, explored and revealed.

Practical implications

The findings provide a new perspective and understanding of the issue for researchers in order to improve their research insights in the field. This study will also benefit marketing practitioners in ensuring the sustainability and innovativeness of technology used to run their DM campaigns.

Originality/value

This research provides the first bibliometric analysis of the citation works and productivity in the field of VR in DM using Biblioshiny, identifies core research gaps and provides future research agenda which can be useful to advance the research understanding in this context.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 41 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

Case study
Publication date: 21 March 2022

Navneet Senecha and Ritu Srivastava

After studying and analyzing this case, students will be able to: understand and evaluate the integrated marketing communications (IMC) strategy for online businesses; understand…

Abstract

Learning outcomes

After studying and analyzing this case, students will be able to: understand and evaluate the integrated marketing communications (IMC) strategy for online businesses; understand and create the various components of an IMC plan; determine the challenges of scaling up a business and how social media marketing can help in that; learn how to assemble the positioning statement of a startup; determine and differentiate the different business models (revenue models); and understand and create the social media marketing strategy.

Case overview/synopsis

It was late April 2021, and Mr Srinivas Rao, the co-founder and director of Mentorrd EduTech, India, was contemplating the journey of more than five years. Much had changed since the startup Mentorrd Education Technologies Pvt. Ltd. (Mentorrd EduTech) was launched in 2015. From being an online artificial intelligence (AI)-based tool for analyzing and building resumes, Mentorrd expanded to specialized premium services for career development catering to MBA aspirants from India to international markets. However, during the same time, many problems had also started showing up. The competition had increased, and conversions became difficult. Mentorrd generated 95% of its leads through Google Ads pay per click (PPC) advertising. However, now, the increased competition made PPC costlier, where Mentorrd started at INR 10 per click but was now paying INR 50 per click. The customers also were only limited to searching for keywords; hence, actual lead conversion was minimal. Mentorrd was present on different social media platforms and had developed an audience: LinkedIn (close to 10,000 followers), Facebook (1,600+ followers) and Twitter (numbers), but conversions from there were only contributing to 5% of the total revenue.Mr Rao wondered that with a change in demand from general review services to specialist resume and interview preparation services such as MBA, he would have to develop a sound social media strategy integrated with the current Google Ads usage to reach the audience and generate conversions. He had a limited marketing budget which he wanted to use most effectively but was not sure how to spend across platforms.

Complexity academic level

This case can be used as an IMC strategy case for MBA courses in marketing. In a marketing course, the focus should be on components of IMC strategy, customer perception, company positioning and marketing channels. The case can also be applied as a strategy case for courses in entrepreneurship or digital marketing strategy. In an entrepreneurship course, the focus should be on the business model, growth and scaling decisions a startup needs to make to grow the business. In a digital marketing strategy course, the focus should be on social media marketing and search engine marketing decisions and the implications for revenues and profits. The case can also be used in executive-level courses to illustrate IMC, growth and digital marketing strategies for a startup.

Supplementary materials

Teaching notes are available for educators only.

Subject code

CSS 8: Marketing.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 28 August 2015

Ian Tsung-yen Chen

This paper proposes that if a political system is more like to facilitate a unified government, to establish a strong executive body and to respond to the needs of the majority…

Abstract

This paper proposes that if a political system is more like to facilitate a unified government, to establish a strong executive body and to respond to the needs of the majority, financial reforms are more likely to emerge from the policymaking process and produce positive results. On the contrary, political systems that discourage those governing features are less likely to produce reforms. This chapter compares financial reform processes in China, Taiwan and New Zealand. All of them performed low level of financial reforms in the early 1980s but resulted in different situations later. In the mid-2000s, New Zealand heralded the most efficient and stable financial system; while Taiwan lagged behind and China performed the worst. Evidence showed that China’s authoritarian system may be the most superior in forming a unified government with a strong executive, but the policy priority often responds more to the interests of a small group of power elites; therefore the result of financial reform can be limited. Taiwan’s presidential system can produce greater financial reform when the ruling party controls both executive and legislative bodies, but legislative obstructions may occur under a divided government. New Zealand's Westminster system produces the most effective and efficient financial reform due to its unified government and a strong executive branch with consistent and stable supports from the New Zealand Parliament.

Details

Asian Leadership in Policy and Governance
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-883-0

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 April 2023

Xinbo Sun, Zhiwei He and Yu Qian

The purpose of this paper is to explore what organizational adaptability means in the digitized context and to discuss how manufacturing companies achieve organizational…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore what organizational adaptability means in the digitized context and to discuss how manufacturing companies achieve organizational adaptability during the digital transformation process.

Design/methodology/approach

By conducting semi-structured interviews and acquiring archive data from a typical Chinese manufacturing company, this paper gathers extensive data. Based on this, a single-case study methodology is used to investigate organizational adaptability in digital transformation.

Findings

This study identifies the process by which companies achieve organizational adaptability during digital transformation and deconstructs organizational adaptability into three dimensions: structural adaptability, operational adaptability and governance adaptability. This study also explores how organizational adaptability is affected by digital capabilities.

Originality/value

This study proposes a process model to demonstrate how organizational adaptability may be attained during digital transformation and redefines organizational adaptability in the context of digitization.

Details

Chinese Management Studies, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-614X

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 31 March 2023

Liangqiang Li, Boyan Yao, Xi Li and Yu Qian

This work aims to explore why people review their experienced online shopping in such a manner (promptness), and what is the potential relationship between the users’ review…

Abstract

Purpose

This work aims to explore why people review their experienced online shopping in such a manner (promptness), and what is the potential relationship between the users’ review promptness and review motivation as well as reviewed contents.

Design/methodology/approach

To evaluate the customers’ responses regarding their shopping experiences, in this paper, the “purchase-review” promptness is studied to explore the temporal characteristics of users’ reviewing behavior online. Then, an aspect mining method was introduced for assessment of review text. Finally, a theoretical model is proposed to analyze how the customers’ reviews were formed.

Findings

First, the length of time elapsed between purchase and review was found to follow a power-law distribution, which characterizes an important number of human behaviors. Within online review behaviors, this meant that a high frequency population of reviewers tended to publish relatively quick reviews online. This showed that the customers’ reviewing behaviors on e-commerce websites may have been affected by extrinsic motivations, intrinsic motivations or both. Second, the proposed review-to-feature mapping technique is a feasible method for exploring reviewers’ opinions in both massive and sparse reviews. Finally, the customers’ reviewing behaviors were found to be mostly consistent with reviewers’ motivations.

Originality/value

First, the authors propose that the “promptness” of users in posting online reviews is an important external manifestation of their motivation, product experience and service experience. Second, a semi-supervised method of review-to-aspect mapping is used to solve the data quality problem in mining information from massive text data, which vary in length, detail and quality. Finally, a huge amount of e-commerce customers’ purchase-review promptness are studied and the results indicate that not all product features are responsible for the “prompt” posting of users’ reviews, and that the platform’s strategy to encourage users to post reviews will not work in the long term.

Details

Journal of Electronic Business & Digital Economics, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2754-4214

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 January 2016

Chao Ye, Xiufang Wen, Jia-ling Lan, Zhi-qi Cai, Pi-hui Pi, Shou-ping Xu and Yu Qian

The purpose of this paper is to modify light hollow polymer microsphere (LHPM) with titanium dioxide nanoparticles (nano-TiO2) to improve its compatibility with latex and apply…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to modify light hollow polymer microsphere (LHPM) with titanium dioxide nanoparticles (nano-TiO2) to improve its compatibility with latex and apply the obtained nano-TiO2/LHPM composite particles in external wall thermal insulation coatings.

Design/methodology/approach

The nano-TiO2/LHPM composite particles were prepared via vigorous stirring. The morphology and chemical composition of the produced nano-TiO2/LHPM composite particles were characterized using scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersion spectrum, thermo-gravimetric analyzer and Fourier transform infrared. The performance of this new composite coating was evaluated by checking its stability, density, radiation reflectivity, thermal conductivity and the resulting insulation temperature difference when forming coating film.

Findings

It was found that a 9:1 mass ratio of nano-TiO2/LHPM with total 10 weight per cent composite particles in the thermal insulation paint showed low density, good stability, low thermal conductivity (0.1687 W/m·K) and high insulation temperature difference (5.8°C).

Research limitations/implications

The LHPM can be modified by other nanoparticles to improve its insulation performance in thermal insulation coatings.

Practical implications

This work provides a simple, robust, but effective approach to produce new thermal insulation coatings with nano-TiO2/LHPM composite particles.

Originality/value

This method for surface modification of LHPMs is novel and the modified hollow polymer microspheres could be applied to external wall insulation coatings.

Details

Pigment & Resin Technology, vol. 45 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0369-9420

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 June 2014

Pui Yan Flora Lau

Discussion of China's one-child policy generally centres on its demographic effects. Bereavement among parents of singleton children and the role of social capital in the…

Abstract

Purpose

Discussion of China's one-child policy generally centres on its demographic effects. Bereavement among parents of singleton children and the role of social capital in the bereavement process have been under-explored. The purpose of this paper is to focus on mothers who lost their only children during the Sichuan earthquake in 2008. The paper aims to discuss the under-explored yet crucial issues of the one-child policy – the ways in which Chinese bereaved mothers handle the death of their singleton children – and the roles that social capital can play in their bereavement process.

Design/methodology/approach

The author conducted eight case studies on bereaved mothers through home visits, semi-structured interviews and participation in public activities during August 2010 and May 2011. In-depth interviews were used to collect information from these bereaved mothers in Sichuan, China.

Findings

The case studies reveal two major experiences of bereaved mother whose familial support varies substantially. One major experience is shared by those who had received emotional support from husband (who offered bonding social capital), and were able to get through the psychological pain. Another experience is shared by bereaved mothers who lost their familial relations. Weak social ties (i.e. an NGO which offered bridging social capital) remained the only source of support. Policies can target at the latter group of mothers by helping them to organise themselves into community-based groups and help to relieve their frustration and grief.

Originality/value

These research findings have implications for the development of NGOs, as well as complementary support for community-based bereavement counselling and community care in China.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 34 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

Keywords

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