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Article

Yong-Ki Lee, Sally Y. Kim, Namho Chung, Kwanghoon Ahn and Jong-Won Lee

Social commerce using social media has been on the rapid increase. Among various social commerce models, group-buying has become the mainstream. There is a paucity of…

Abstract

Purpose

Social commerce using social media has been on the rapid increase. Among various social commerce models, group-buying has become the mainstream. There is a paucity of research related to how customers perceive value in group-buying situations. This paper aims to examine and analyze various factors that influence perceived customer value in group-buying.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected using a survey on customers who had purchased a restaurant service deal on a group-buying site. A partial least squares technique was used to estimate the model.

Findings

Results show that perceived customer value affects customers’ group buying intentions and that all four antecedents of perceived value (low price, valence of experience, trust in social media and reputation of the group-buying site) have a significant influence. Implications and further research directions are discussed at the end of the paper.

Originality/value

This study provides valuable strategic implications for social commerce firms.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 30 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

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Article

Yong-Ki Lee, Soon-Ho Kim, Min-Seong Kim and Ho-Seok Kim

Seeking to build a deeper understanding of a higher level of hospitality in terms of employee task performance, this study aimed to explore different person–environment…

Abstract

Purpose

Seeking to build a deeper understanding of a higher level of hospitality in terms of employee task performance, this study aimed to explore different person–environment (P–E) fit types and the corresponding effects on hotel employees’ emotions and task performance, evaluated by both the employees themselves and their supervisors.

Design/methodology/approach

Frequency analysis, reliability analysis, confirmatory factor analysis, correlation analysis and structural equation modeling method.

Findings

The results indicated that person–organization fit was associated with emotions toward the organization, the team and the job. However, this study did not provide empirical support for hypotheses that person-team fit affected emotions. Person–job fit was also associated with positive emotions toward the organization and the job, unlike with the team. Organization emotion had positive effects on both task performances, whereas no effect was reported between team emotion and task performances.

Practical implications

The study suggests that hotels’ human resource administrators may want to focus on developing and strengthening P–E fit and emotional responses.

Originality/value

This research illustrates the impact of three types of P–E fit on self-rated and supervisor-rated performance and examines the significant mediating role of three types of emotion.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 29 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

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Article

Kevin E. Voss, Emily C. Tanner, Mayoor Mohan, Yong-Ki Lee and Hong Keun Kim

Reciprocity has traditionally been overlooked in social exchange models of inter-firm relationships. Therefore, this research integrates reciprocity and its antecedents…

Abstract

Purpose

Reciprocity has traditionally been overlooked in social exchange models of inter-firm relationships. Therefore, this research integrates reciprocity and its antecedents into a social exchange model of inter-firm relationships.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors collected primary data from a sample of firms in the Republic of Korea using a questionnaire. They also used covariance-based structural equations modeling to fit the model given the proposed conceptualization.

Findings

Both conceptually and empirically, adding reciprocity and its antecedents to the social exchange model produce results that differ from previously published papers. Specifically, reciprocity affects information exchanged indirectly through both credibility and benevolence trust. In addition, the effect of information exchange mediates the effect of trust on calculative and affective commitment.

Research limitations/implications

The foundation of long-term inter-firm relationships is quality information exchange, which is based on the development of credibility and benevolence trust, which in turn is based on reciprocity. Thus, reciprocity is a key variable in relationship development.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this paper is among the first to combine reciprocity and its antecedents into a social exchange model that contains trust and commitment. This model provides a bigger picture of how firms develop long-term relationships with their partner firms.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 34 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

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Article

Yong‐Ki Lee, Jung‐Heon Nam, Dae‐Hwan Park and Kyung Ah Lee

The purpose of this study is to analyze the structural relationship between empowerment, service training, service reward, job attitudes such as job satisfaction and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to analyze the structural relationship between empowerment, service training, service reward, job attitudes such as job satisfaction and organizational commitment, and customer‐oriented prosocial behavior of employees.

Design/methodology/approach

The research question is examined using a sample of Korean hotel employees. Structural equation analysis is used to test various research hypotheses and examine the extent to which job satisfaction and organizational commitment mediate the effect of empowerment, service training, and service reward on customer‐oriented prosocial behavior.

Findings

First, the greater the job satisfaction, the greater is the role‐prescribed customer service of employees. Second, the greater the job satisfaction, the greater is the organizational commitment. Third, empowerment has a significant effect on organizational commitment and extra‐role customer service. Fourth, service training has a significant effect on job satisfaction, but it has a negatively direct effect on organizational commitment. Fifth, service reward has a significant influence on job satisfaction and organizational commitment.

Practical implications

Based on these empirical findings, employee management should be shifted from a transactional to a relationship‐building orientation – the former being short‐term goal‐oriented and the latter long‐term. Additionally, service organizations should evaluate employee lifetime value (ELV) as well as customer lifetime value (CLV).

Research limitations/implications

There is a need to extend the results to a diverse range of service industries.

Originality/value

This research explains that empowerment, service training, and service reward contribute to the evaluation of organizational commitment through the medium of job satisfaction.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

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Article

Yong-ki Lee, Sally Kim, Min-Seong Kim, Jae-Han Lee and Ki-Taek Lim

This paper aims to examine the effect of different relational bonding strategies on franchisees’ perceptions of benefits. The duration of the relationship is framed as a…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the effect of different relational bonding strategies on franchisees’ perceptions of benefits. The duration of the relationship is framed as a moderator between three types of relational bonds and the perceived benefits.

Design/methodology/approach

The data are collected via a survey from foodservice franchisees in South Korea. To test the study’s hypotheses, the research model was estimated with two-stage least squares.

Findings

The result shows that social and structural bonds have a significant impact on franchisees’ perceptions of benefits. There are some significant interactions between different types of relational bonds and the duration of the relationship. Perceptions of benefits are found to influence satisfaction, intentions to recommend, intentions to renew the contract and long-term orientation.

Practical implications

The study suggests that franchisors may want to focus on developing and strengthening social bonds, and also customize their relational approaches based on the duration of the relationship with the franchisees.

Originality/value

This research illustrates the impact of three types of relational bonding strategies on franchisees’ perceptions of the benefits and also examines the significant moderating role of the duration of the relationship.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 30 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

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Article

Barry J. Babin, Yong‐Ki Lee, Eun‐Ju Kim and Mitch Griffin

The research seeks to extend the notions of utilitarian and hedonic value to account for outcomes of consumer service encounters.

Abstract

Purpose

The research seeks to extend the notions of utilitarian and hedonic value to account for outcomes of consumer service encounters.

Design/methodology/approach

The research question is examined using a sample of Korean restaurant consumers who used a structured questionnaire to evaluate their dining experience. Structural equations analysis is used to test various research hypotheses and examine the extent to which consumer service value mediates the effect of the environment on customer satisfaction and future intentions.

Findings

Key findings include the ability of the consumer service value scale to account for utilitarian and hedonic value, the role of functional and affective service environment components in shaping consumer satisfaction and future patronage intentions and the relative diagnosticity of positive affect.

Research limitations/implications

There is a need to extend the results to a diverse range of cultures.

Practical implications

Restaurant managers should place increased emphasis on the physical environment as it clearly plays a role in creating positive consumer outcomes and building strong customer relationships.

Originality/value

The use of the consumer value scale (CSV) – particularly in a novel service context.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

Content available
Article

Abstract

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 20 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

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Article

Mehmet Ali Koseoglu

This study aims to address how the social structure of the hospitality management field has evolved from 1960 to 2016.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to address how the social structure of the hospitality management field has evolved from 1960 to 2016.

Design/methodology/approach

The informal social structure of the hospitality management literature was analyzed by collecting authorship data from seven hospitality management journals. Co-authorship analyses via network analysis were conducted.

Findings

According to the findings, throughout the history of hospitality management, international collaboration levels are relatively low. Based on social network analysis, the research community is only loosely connected, and the network of the community does not fit with the small-world network theory. Additional findings indicate that researchers in the hospitality management literature are ranked via degree centrality, closeness centrality and betweenness centrality. Cliques, which contain at least five researchers, and core researchers are identified.

Practical implications

This study helps both scholars and practitioners improve the informal structure of the field. Scholars must generate strong ties to strengthen cross-fertilization in the field; hence, they collaborate with authors who have strong positions in the field. Specifically, this provides a useful performance analysis. To the extent that institutions and individuals are rewarded for publications, this study demonstrates the performance and connectivity of several key researchers in the field. This finding could be interesting to (post)graduate students. Hospitality managers looking for advisors and consultants could benefit from the findings. Additionally, these are beneficial for journal editors, junior researchers and agencies/institutions.

Originality/value

As one of the first study in the field, this research examines the informal social structure of hospitality management literature in seven journals.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 32 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

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Article

Antony King Fung Wong, Mehmet Ali Koseoglu and Seongseop (Sam) Kim

This study aims to examine the current state of the research activities of scholars in the hospitality and tourism field by analyzing the first 20 years of the new millennium.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the current state of the research activities of scholars in the hospitality and tourism field by analyzing the first 20 years of the new millennium.

Design/methodology/approach

Longitudinal analyses using 14,229 journal articles as data source were realized by adopting BibExcel, Gephi and VOSviewer network analysis software packages.

Findings

This study provides a comprehensive overview of the hospitality and tourism research based on authorship and social network analysis, with patterns of prolific authors compared over four distinct periods.

Research limitations/implications

The hospitality and tourism academic society is clearly illustrated by tracing academic publication activities across 20 years in the new millennium. In addition, this study provides a guide for scholars to search for multidisciplinary collaboration opportunities. Government agencies and non-governmental organisations can also benefit from this study by identifying appropriate review panel members when making decisions about hospitality- and tourism-related proposals.

Originality/value

To the best of authors’ knowledge, this study is the first to use bibliometric analysis in assessing research published in leading hospitality and tourism journals across the four breakout periods in the new millennium.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 33 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

Content available
Article

Yong-Ki Min, Sang-Gun Lee and Yaichi Aoshima

Starting from industry 4.0 in Germany and followed by the New Strategy for American Innovation in the USA and the smartization strategy in Japan, developed countries are…

Abstract

Purpose

Starting from industry 4.0 in Germany and followed by the New Strategy for American Innovation in the USA and the smartization strategy in Japan, developed countries are pushing nation-wide innovation strategies. Similarly, China is pursuing the Made in China 2025, and Korea announced the Manufacturing Industry Innovation 3.0 strategy. However, few researchers have identified the industrial structure that establishes the foundation of the 4th Industrial Revolution or have derived strengths and weaknesses to provide implications on policy formulation through quantitative comparison with developed countries. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to analyze the spillover effect of the information and communication technology (ICT) industry (the foundation of the 4th Industrial Revolution) and machinery·equipment industry (the foundation of smart manufacturing through convergence with ICT industry).

Design/methodology/approach

This study examines the industrial spillover effects of the ICT industry and machinery·equipment industry in the USA, Germany, Japan, China and Korea by using the World Input–Output Table from 2000 to 2014.

Findings

The results showed that backward linkage effect of the ICT Industry are high in the order of Korea≑China>Japan>the USA≑Germany, and forward linkage effect of the ICT industry are high in the order of Japan ≑> the USA≑Korea ≑> China ≑> Germany. Backward linkage effects of the machinery·equipment industry are high in the order of China>Japan≑Korea>the USA>Germany, and forward linkage effects of the machinery·equipment industry are high in the order of China>Korea>Germany≑Japan≑the USA.

Practical implications

China and Korea encourage active government investment in ICT and machinery·equipment industries, especially the intentional convergence between ICT and machinery·equipment industries is expected be generate higher synergy. The “innovation in manufacturing” strategy in the USA that utilizes its strength in ICT services seems appropriate, whereas Germany needs to revitalize the ICT industry to strengthen its manufacturing industry. Japan’s strategy is to focus its ICT capabilities on robot sector. While the scope of innovation is limited, its synergy is worth expecting.

Originality/value

This study attempted to provide a theoretical approach to the determination of national policy strategies and provide practical implications for response to the impacts of the 4th Industrial Revolution, by comparing the inducement effects of ICT and machinery·equipment industries between major countries.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 119 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

Keywords

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