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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1992

Ian R. Macaulay and Roy C. Wood

Reports and analyses the findings of recent research undertaken infive Scottish centres to assess hotel and catering workers′ attitudes totrade unions. Initially, reviews…

Abstract

Reports and analyses the findings of recent research undertaken in five Scottish centres to assess hotel and catering workers′ attitudes to trade unions. Initially, reviews the reasons advanced in explaining low union density in the hotel and catering industry. These explanations formed the basis to the research project which are reported. The research fieldwork comprised interviews with hotel and catering workers in a variety of establishments across a range of industry sub‐sectors. Contrary to what would have been expected from a review of previous research, Scottish hotel and catering workers demonstrated positive views of trade unions and a high level of interest in union membership. In the light of such views, gives consideration to the reasons why hotel and catering workers remain largely non‐unionized in terms of employer hostility to trade unions and employee doubts about the potential for union success in the industry.

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Employee Relations, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1990

Stephanie M. Jameson and Simon Hargraves

The “demographic time bomb” will haveimplications for all industries, especially in therecruitment of graduates. This situation isexplored with reference to the hotel and

Abstract

The “demographic time bomb” will have implications for all industries, especially in the recruitment of graduates. This situation is explored with reference to the hotel and catering industry in the UK. Research carried out into the job opportunities for graduates in this sector of industry is reported with regard to the types of job package offered; training; levels of responsibility and career prospects; salary and fringe benefits. It was found that the packages offered exhibit similarities and differences when compared with those offered by other industries and concludes that the present situation in the hotel and catering industry may have arisen from a failure to regard itself as competing in the wider graduate labour market.

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Personnel Review, vol. 19 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1970

Parker of, J. Ashworth and J. Talbot

January 21, 1970 Industrial Training — Industrial training levy — Hotel and catering industry — Statutory Order including in scope of activities “supply … of food and

Abstract

January 21, 1970 Industrial Training — Industrial training levy — Hotel and catering industry — Statutory Order including in scope of activities “supply … of food and drink to persons for immediate consumption” — Food and drink supplied to intermediary for consumption by other persons — Company supplying prepared meals to airlines — Consumed by passengers at mealtimes — Whether “immediate consumption” — Whether company engaged in “activity” within scope of Order — Whether levy properly imposed — Industrial Training Act, 1964 (c.16), s.4(1) — Industrial Training (Hotel and Catering Board) Order, 1966 (S.I. 1966, No. 1347), Sch. 1, para. 1(a) — Industrial Training Levy (Hotel and Catering) Order, 1968 (S.I. 1968, No. 921), para. 2(1) (h) (i).

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Managerial Law, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1993

Arsène H. Aslan and Roy C. Wood

Given the principal characteristics of hotel and catering industryemployment – low pay, low job security, high labour turnover,often arbitrary management – it is a matter…

Abstract

Given the principal characteristics of hotel and catering industry employment – low pay, low job security, high labour turnover, often arbitrary management – it is a matter of some interest that the industry is unionized to only a limited extent. Offers a brief summary of the principal reasons advanced for explaining low unionization in the industry before proceeding to focus on the attitudes of hotel managers towards these explanations. Reports research based on interviews with managers in Scotland, during which individuals were asked to respond to a range of points with a view to ascertaining the continuing relevance or otherwise of the findings of previous research. Principal findings are that a tension exists between a general, if reluctant, acceptance of the need, by managers, for union representation in the industry and a belief in their own managerial efficacy which makes unions irrelevant to their particular circumstances.

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Employee Relations, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1999

Annemarie Piso

A coherent theoretical class analysis of hotel and catering workers can provide a systematic means by which to explain the behaviour of these workers in reaction to their…

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Abstract

A coherent theoretical class analysis of hotel and catering workers can provide a systematic means by which to explain the behaviour of these workers in reaction to their employment. By examining the class relations within this industry, the paper challenges the notion that hotel and catering workers are in any sense unique, but rather, suggests that the economic role that these workers serve is as much a function of capitalist relations of production as that of workers more commonly associated with high levels of unionisation. Though recognising that real structural barriers exist impeding union growth and leading to individualised forms of resistance among workers, the paper sets out to emphasise that the antagonistic industrial relations arising from the work situation of hotel and catering workers can at the same time provide a fertile ground for more collective forms of resistance thus laying the basis for higher levels of unionisation.

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Employee Relations, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1969

Reid, Pearce, Upjohn, Donovan and Pearson

May 13, 1969 Industrial Training — Industrial training levy — Hotel and catering industry — Statutory Order including in scope of “activities” provision of meals and

Abstract

May 13, 1969 Industrial Training — Industrial training levy — Hotel and catering industry — Statutory Order including in scope of “activities” provision of meals and lodging by members' club — Club not engaged in industry or commerce — Whether activities of industry or commerce — “Those activities” — Whether club “employers in the industry” — Validity of Order — Industrial Training Act, 1964 (1964 c.16), ss. 1(1)(2), 4(1) — Industrial Training (Hotel and Catering Board) Order 1966 (S.I. 1966 No. 1347).

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Managerial Law, vol. 6 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1970

M.R. Denning, Fenton Atkinson and L.J. Cairns

October 15, 1970 Industrial Training — Industrial training levy — Hotel and catering industry — Statutory Order including in scope of activities “supply… of food and drink…

Abstract

October 15, 1970 Industrial Training — Industrial training levy — Hotel and catering industry — Statutory Order including in scope of activities “supply… of food and drink to persons for immediate consumption” — Food and drink supplied to intermediary for consumption by other persons — Company supplying prepared meals to airlines — Consumed by passengers at mealtimes — Whether “immediate consumption” — Whether company engaged in “activity” within scope of Order — Whether levy properly imposed — Industrial Training Act, 1964 (c.16), s.4(l) — Industrial Training (Hotel and Catering Board) Order, 1966 (S.1. 1966, No. 1347), Sch. 1, para. 1(a) — Industrial Training Levy (Hotel and Catering) Order, 1968 (S.I. 1968, No. 921), para. 2(1) (h) (i).

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Managerial Law, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1970

Parker of, J. Ashworth and J. Shaw

October 27, 1969 Industrial Training — Industrial training levy — Hotel and Catering Board — Company limited by guarantee — Association of freemasons — Objects including…

Abstract

October 27, 1969 Industrial Training — Industrial training levy — Hotel and Catering Board — Company limited by guarantee — Association of freemasons — Objects including establishment and maintenance of club — Whether a “Members' club” or company managing a proprietary club — Test — Matter of fact and degree in every case — Industrial Training Act, 1964 (c. 16), ss. 1 (1), 4 (1) — Industrial Training (Hotel and Catering Board) Order, 1966 [S.I. 1966 No. 1347], art. 2, Sch. I, paras. 1 (a), 3 (c) (i) (ii), (d).

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Managerial Law, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1992

Andrew Boer

Considers the causes of the high bankruptcy rate in small firms inthe hotel and catering industry and suggests that although the majorcauses of failure must lie within the…

Abstract

Considers the causes of the high bankruptcy rate in small firms in the hotel and catering industry and suggests that although the major causes of failure must lie within the scope of the small firms themselves, the contribution and actions of the major lending institutions have done little to help to alleviate this situation. Explores the present relationship between the small firms, the banks and the Government and considers the effect that the turbulent competitive market of the lending institutions has had on the small firms in the industry. Finally the structure and nature of relationships between banks, small firms and the governments of other European countries are considered before conclusions are drawn.

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International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1998

Mervyn D.J. Wilson, Anna E. Murray, Margaret A. Black and David A. McDowell

In recent times the importance of training and education have been recognised as important tools to foster economic growth within companies and industries in the global…

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3549

Abstract

In recent times the importance of training and education have been recognised as important tools to foster economic growth within companies and industries in the global marketplace. Unfortunately the UK hospitality industry in general has been unwilling to train and develop its managers. This paper examines the contract catering sector of the hospitality industry in Northern Ireland. It commences by investigating the educational qualifications and training of managers within the contract catering sector and then proceeds to discuss the transference of hospitality skills and practices.

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Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 22 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

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