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Article
Publication date: 14 September 2021

Saarce Elsye Hatane, Bernard Emerson, Olievia Soesanto, Ruth Arum Gunawan and Hatane Semuel

The purpose of this study is to discover the impact of worklife balance on the intention to pursue accounting careers through accounting career image.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to discover the impact of worklife balance on the intention to pursue accounting careers through accounting career image.

Design/methodology/approach

The study managed to collect 693 closed questionnaires, using the five-point Likert Scale, from accounting students in several universities in Java, Sulawesi and Kalimantan, as the three most densely populated islands in Indonesia. The research model is analysed using partial least square method as a part of structural equation modelling.

Findings

There are positive and significant influences between worklife balance and the intention to pursue accounting career when supported by accounting career image. The positive perception of accounting career image motivates accounting students to pursue accounting careers. Accounting students argue that attaining a balance between work and personal life can improve positive perceptions of accounting careers, which drive them to pursue a career in accounting. Worklife balance is an essential factor due to the fact that it can, directly and indirectly, affect the intention to pursue accounting careers. In addition, positive image of accounting profession is found to be able to strengthen the positive influence of the worklife balance to pursue accounting careers.

Research limitations/implications

Further studies can continue along the line of this study as the intention to choose an accounting career can change from time to time. In addition, the generational difference may create a discrepancy in perception and orientation in choosing accounting careers. Therefore, future studies should consider a broader scope and more updated objects.

Practical implications

The findings suggest that working experience is an essential part for accounting students in choosing accounting careers, and so higher education institutions need to consider including field work-practice in their curriculums. Companies are also expected to prioritise worklife balance since it will motivate accounting students to choose an accounting career.

Originality/value

This study investigates the link between worklife balance and decisions to pursue accounting careers through accounting students' perceptions in Indonesia. This study combines the influences of worklife balance and accounting career image on the intention to pursue accounting careers in one model, in which accounting career image is the mediating variable in the indirect link of worklife balance.

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

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Article
Publication date: 2 March 2020

Rumiana Stoilova, Petya Ilieva-Trichkova and Franziska Bieri

The purpose of this paper is to explore how individual and macro-level factors shape the worklife balance of young men and women across European countries.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore how individual and macro-level factors shape the worklife balance of young men and women across European countries.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper combines macro-level data from the official statistics with individual-level data from the Work, Family and Wellbeing (2010/2011) module of the European Social Survey. The study uses multilevel modelling to explore the factors which shape the worklife balance of men and women aged 15–34 across 24 European countries.

Findings

The findings show both differences and similarities between young men and women in how education shapes worklife balance. Higher education increases the likelihood of considering worklife balance as important in work selection for men, while lower education decreases the odds of considering this balance for women. More education is associated with lower acceptance of the traditional norm, for both men and women, and less time spent on housework. Higher share of family benefits decreases the importance of worklife balance, more so for men than for women. Worklife balance is more important for men living in conservative, Mediterranean and post-socialist welfare regimes compared to those from social-democratic regimes.

Social implications

The policy implications are to more closely consider education in the transformation of gender-sensitive norms during earlier stages of child socialization and to design more holistic policy measures which address the multitude of barriers individuals from poor families and ethnic/migrant background face.

Originality/value

The study contributes to existing literature by applying the capability approach to the empirical investigation of worklife balance. The analytical model contains three dimensions – norms about paid/unpaid work, considering worklife balance in the choice of employment and time spent on unpaid work. Through this approach, we are able to uncover the agency inequality of young people taking into account individual level characteristics, including gender, education, ethnicity and macro-level factors.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 40 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

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Article
Publication date: 11 May 2012

Sumaira Rehman and Muhammad Azam Roomi

Increased participation of women in the labor force creates challenges for them to balance work and family obligations. The situation becomes more complicated in…

Abstract

Purpose

Increased participation of women in the labor force creates challenges for them to balance work and family obligations. The situation becomes more complicated in patriarchal societies such as Pakistan due to women's stereotypical domestic roles, religious prescriptions as well as cultural norms and values. This study aims to explore different influencing factors on women's work and family roles in the unique Pakistani socio‐economic and cultural environment.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on the interpretive phenomenological approach (IPA), this study explores different influencing factors on women's work and family roles in the unique Pakistani socio‐economic and cultural environment. The methodology helped to analyse data about challenges faced by women entrepreneurs to achieve worklife balance as well as to have an insight about some of the techniques and effective strategies they use to balance work and family obligation.

Findings

The results show that among other motivational drivers to start their own businesses, achieving worklife balance is one of the most significant ones. Their own businesses give them flexibility, control and freedom to juggle with their family and social responsibilities. Lack of sufficient time, gender bias, social and cultural norms as well as family responsibilities are the most significant challenges women face to achieve balance in a patriarchal Islamic society. Strategic planning, organising and delegating are the most effective strategies women use to cope with competing roles of work and family.

Originality/value

This ground‐breaking work in Pakistan on women entrepreneurs' worklife balance may also inspire other women who want to start their entrepreneurial career.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

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Article
Publication date: 5 October 2010

S.B. Burnett, C.J. Gatrell, C.L. Cooper and P. Sparrow

The paper considers the impact of worklife balance policies on the work and family practices of professional, dual‐earner parents with dependent children, by assessing…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper considers the impact of worklife balance policies on the work and family practices of professional, dual‐earner parents with dependent children, by assessing the extent to which “well‐balanced families” have been resultantly facilitated. It poses two research questions: the first centres on how far worklife balance policies have better enabled working parents to manage their commitments to employers and children, whilst the second focuses on how far parental and employer responses to worklife balance policies may be gendered. The ultimate aim is to (re)‐articulate the importance of gender in the worklife balance agenda.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper draws upon historical and conceptual research on work and family practices. It invokes gender as a lens through which notions of the “well‐balanced family” are considered.

Findings

It is argued that worklife balance policies have not led to well‐balanced, or “gender‐neutral”, work and family practices. This is for two reasons, both relating to gender. First, the take up of worklife balance policies is gendered, with more mothers than fathers working flexibly. This is partly because organizational expectations fail to acknowledge social change around the paternal parenting role. Second, worklife balance policies focus mainly on the issues of paid work and childcare, failing to take account of domestic labour, the main burden of which continues to be carried by mothers.

Practical implications

Deeply ingrained social assumptions about the gendered division of labour within heterosexual couples limit the impact of worklife balance policies on work family practices.

Originality/value

The paper moves forward the debate on worklife balance through taking an interdisciplinary approach to an issue which has often been addressed previously from discipline‐specific approaches such as health, psychology or policy.

Details

Gender in Management: An International Journal, vol. 25 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2413

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Article
Publication date: 7 August 2007

Meghna Virick, Juliana D. Lilly and Wendy J. Casper

The purpose of this research is to examine how increased work overload of layoff survivors relates to their worklife balance and job and life satisfaction.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to examine how increased work overload of layoff survivors relates to their worklife balance and job and life satisfaction.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey methodology was used to collect data from 510 layoff survivors in a high tech company. Regression analyses and structural equation modeling were used to test the hypotheses.

Findings

The study found that layoff survivors experience higher levels of workload which impact overall role overload that negatively affects worklife balance. Findings suggest that high workloads experienced by layoff survivors contribute to reduced job and life satisfaction through reduced worklife balance as a mediating mechanism.

Research limitations/implications

The data used in this paper is cross‐sectional and conducted within a single organization. Also, most of the data is obtained from self report survey data and subject to common method bias. As such, longitudinal studies are recommended for future research.

Originality/value

This study makes a contribution by joining two distinct research streams – the job loss literature with research on work‐family issues. Findings suggest that high workloads experienced by layoff survivors contribute to reduced job and life satisfaction with worklife balance acting as a mediator. Future research should determine whether these findings generalize to diverse layoff survivors in distinct industries, and assess whether these phenomena change over time.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 12 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

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Article
Publication date: 11 November 2013

Susana Pasamar and Ramón Valle Cabrera

The purpose of this paper is to analyse perceptions of institutional pressures on employers to improve the work-life balance in challenging environments with difficult…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyse perceptions of institutional pressures on employers to improve the work-life balance in challenging environments with difficult financial and economic conditions and to classify organisations according to these perceptions.

Design/methodology/approach

Using survey data from 146 Spanish private firms in different industries, the cluster analysis was conducted.

Findings

The analysis clearly shows the existence of three different groups of companies according to their perception of coercive, mimetic and normative pressures, and the different characteristics of the groups. The perceptions of institutional pressures determine the stance of the company with regard to work-life balance.

Research limitations/implications

Despite the changing economic context, it seems important to analyse the existence of environmental pressures to encourage work-life balance.

Social implications

Spain still has a long way to go in the diffusion of work-life practices.

Originality/value

This paper explores the institutional pressures on employers to improve work-life balance in a crisis context, and in a non-Anglo-Saxon country, showing that companies pay attention to the dynamics of the environment in which the company operates, and do not only consider economic reasons.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 34 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

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Article
Publication date: 2 January 2007

Joanna Hughes and Nikos Bozionelos

The purpose of this article is to explore the views of male workers in a male dominated occupation on issues that pertain to worklife balance.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to explore the views of male workers in a male dominated occupation on issues that pertain to worklife balance.

Design/methodology/approach

The study was qualitative in nature. Semi‐structured interviews were conducted with 20 bus drivers employed by a single company in order to identify their perceptions on the following: whether issues related to worklife balance were sources of concern and dissatisfaction; how concern over issues related to worklife balance was compared to other sources of concern and dissatisfaction; and whether issues related to worklife balance were linked with withdrawal attitudes and behaviours.

Findings

It emerged that worklife imbalance was not only a source of concern, but also that it was the major source of dissatisfaction for participants. Furthermore, participants made a clear connection between problems with worklife balance and withdrawal behaviours, including turnover and non‐genuine sick absence.

Originality/value

The study has value at both scholarly and practice level. At scholarly level, the research investigated an important contemporary issue within a neglected group: male workers in a low profile male dominated occupation. At practice level, the findings suggest that work life imbalance incurs tangible costs to organisations; hence, organisations need to establish human resource systems to deal with it. Furthermore, pertinent legislation may need to be developed and enacted.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 36 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 14 March 2016

Marta Mas-Machuca, Jasmina Berbegal-Mirabent and Ines Alegre

The purpose of this paper is to explore the relationship between work-life balance, organizational pride and job satisfaction. When evaluating employee work-life balance

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the relationship between work-life balance, organizational pride and job satisfaction. When evaluating employee work-life balance the present paper takes into consideration two relevant antecedents: supervisor support and job autonomy; and explores their link with organizational pride and job satisfaction.

Design/methodology/approach

To verify the hypothesis, a questionnaire survey was used to collect data in a Spanish pharmaceutical organization; 374 responses were obtained. Structural equation modeling was used for the data analysis.

Findings

Data confirms the relationship between the analyzed constructs. The results support the hypothesized relationships of supervisor work-life balance support and autonomy with employee work-life balance. In addition, employee work-life balance is positively related with organizational pride and job satisfaction.

Practical implications

This study provides a useful measurement model that employers and employees can use to evaluate and improve work-life balance through job autonomy and supervisor support. Companies should pay attention to employee work-life balance to enhance organizational pride and job satisfaction. The research tries to help companies to more effectively use their human capital resources.

Originality/value

The paper addresses gaps in the current literature in work-life, organizational pride and job satisfaction. The results may serve as the criteria for managers to better enhance employee job satisfaction in organizations.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 31 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Article
Publication date: 17 July 2007

Nicola Hughes

The purpose of this case study is to highlight to individuals and businesses the importance of worklife balance and how it can have a massive impact on one's daily life

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this case study is to highlight to individuals and businesses the importance of worklife balance and how it can have a massive impact on one's daily life. It aims to describe the pitfalls of not having a policy in place and also how a business can go about implementing a policy.

Design/methodology/approach

The subject scope of the paper is to inform employers and employees of all aspects of worklife balance from the cause and effect to the methods available to help them achieve a great balance and improve productivity and wellbeing.

Findings

The case study shows that worklife balance is having a massive impact not only on businesses productivity, but also on the economy as a whole. A massive amount of money is being lost due to illness, etc. The information included from companies such as BT who have already implemented a worklife balance programme shows that the results are significant. The increase in staff wellbeing and productivity is amazing and shows that implementing these programmes really makes a difference.

Originality/value

The case study is invaluable to any employer who has a team of staff. The findings of the research undertaken with BT shows that companies cannot wait until worklife balance becomes a “must have” – it needs to be implemented straightaway to ensure that staff are happy in their job and that no aspect of their career is contributing to ill health. BT show that by ensuring that “worklifebalance is prevalent in their business they have reduced absenteeism, increased productivity and have a more responsive and effective workforce.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 39 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

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Article
Publication date: 30 May 2008

Sara J. Wilkinson

This paper aims to establish and illustrate the levels of awareness of worklife balance policies within the surveying profession in Australia and New Zealand. The culture…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to establish and illustrate the levels of awareness of worklife balance policies within the surveying profession in Australia and New Zealand. The culture and characteristics of the Australian and New Zealand work force are to be identified. The key aspects included in worklife balance policies are to be illustrated and the perceived benefits for the surveying profession are to be noted. The paper seeks to posit that it is vital to comprehend the levels of awareness of worklife balance issues within the surveying profession first, so that benchmarking may occur over time within the profession and second, that comparisons may be drawn with other professions.

Design/methodology/approach

There is a growing body of research into worklife balance and the built environment professions. Using a questionnaire survey of the whole RICS qualified surveying profession in Australia and New Zealand, this paper identifies the awareness of worklife balance benefits within the surveying profession.

Findings

This research provides evidence that awareness of the issues and options is unevenly spread amongst professional surveyors in the region. With shortages of professionals and an active economy the pressures on existing employees looks set to rise and therefore this is an area which needs to be benchmarked and revisited with a view to adopting best practice throughout the sector. The implications are that employers ignore worklife balance issues at their peril.

Practical implications

There is much to be learned from an increased understanding of worklife balance issues for professionals in the surveying discipline. The consequences of an imbalance between work and personal or family life is emotional exhaustion, cynicism and burnout. The consequences for employers or surveying firms are reduced effectiveness and profitability and increased employee turnover or churn.

Originality/value

Leading on from Ellison's UK surveying profession study and Lingard and Francis's Australian civil engineering and construction industry studies, this paper seeks to raise awareness of the benefits of adopting worklife balance policies within surveying firms and to establish benchmarks of awareness within the Australian and New Zealand surveying profession.

Details

Structural Survey, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-080X

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