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Open Access
Article
Publication date: 22 December 2021

Stephen McCarthy, Wendy Rowan, Nina Kahma, Laura Lynch and Titiana Petra Ertiö

The dropout rates of open e-learning platforms are often cited as high as 97%, with many users discontinuing their use after initial acceptance. This study aims to explore this…

2091

Abstract

Purpose

The dropout rates of open e-learning platforms are often cited as high as 97%, with many users discontinuing their use after initial acceptance. This study aims to explore this anomaly through the lens of affordances theory, revealing design–reality gaps between users' diverse goals and the possibilities for action provided by an open IT artefact.

Design/methodology/approach

A six-month case study was undertaken to investigate the design implications of user-perceived affordances in an EU sustainability project which developed an open e-learning platform for citizens to improve their household energy efficiency. Thematic analysis was used to reveal the challenges of user continuance behaviour based on how an open IT artefact supports users in achieving individual goals (e.g. reducing energy consumption in the home) and collective goals (lessening the carbon footprint of society).

Findings

Based on the findings, the authors inductively reveal seven affordances related to open e-learning platforms: informing, assessment, synthesis, emphasis, clarity, learning pathway and goal-planning. The findings centre on users' perception of these affordances, and the extent to which the open IT artefact catered to the goals and constraints of diverse user groups. Open IT platform development is further discussed from an iterative and collaborative perspective in order to explore different possibilities for action.

Originality/value

The study contributes towards research on open IT artefact design by presenting key learnings on how the designers of e-learning platforms can bridge design–reality gaps through exploring affordance personalisation for diverse user groups. This can inform the design of open IT artefacts to help ensure that system features match the expectations and contextual constraints of users through clear action-oriented possibilities.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 35 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 January 2023

Stephen McCarthy, Wendy Rowan, Carolanne Mahony and Antoine Vergne

Social media platforms are a pervasive technology that continues to define the modern world. While social media has brought many benefits to society in terms of connection and…

1084

Abstract

Purpose

Social media platforms are a pervasive technology that continues to define the modern world. While social media has brought many benefits to society in terms of connection and content sharing, numerous concerns remain for the governance of social media platforms going forward, including (but not limited to) the spread of misinformation, hate speech and online surveillance. However, the voice of citizens and other non-experts is often missing from such conversations in information systems literature, which has led to an alleged gap between research and the everyday life of citizens.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors address this gap by presenting findings from 16 h of online dialog with 25 citizens on social media platform governance. The online dialog was undertaken as part of a worldwide consultation project called “We, the internet”, which sought to provide citizens with a voice on a range of topics such as “Digitalization and Me,” “My Data, Your Data, Our Data” and “A Strong Digital Public Sphere.” Five phases of thematic analysis were undertaken by the authors to code the corpus of qualitative data.

Findings

Drawing on the Theory of Communicative Action, the authors discuss three dialogical processes critical to citizen discourse: lifeworld reasoning, rationalization and moral action. The findings point toward citizens’ perspectives of current and future issues associated with social media platform governance, including concerns around the multiplicity of digital identities, consent for vulnerable groups and transparency in content moderation. The findings also reveal citizens’ rationalization of the dilemmas faced in addressing these issues going forward, including tensions such as digital accountability vs data privacy, protection vs inclusion and algorithmic censorship vs free speech.

Originality/value

Based on outcomes from this dialogical process, moral actions in the form of policy recommendations are proposed by citizens and for citizens. The authors find that tackling these dark sides of digitalization is something too important to be left to “Big Tech” and equally requires an understanding of citizens’ perspectives to ensure an informed and positive imprint for change.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 33 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 8 August 2017

Abstract

Details

Emotion in the Library Workplace
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-083-9

Article
Publication date: 15 February 2011

Wendy L. Currie and David J. Finnegan

This paper seeks to report the findings from a seven‐year study on the UK National Health Service on the introduction of an electronic health record for 50 million citizens. It…

2728

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to report the findings from a seven‐year study on the UK National Health Service on the introduction of an electronic health record for 50 million citizens. It explores the relationship between policy and practice in the introduction of a large‐scale national ICT programme at an estimated value of £12.4bn.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a longitudinal research method, data are collected on the policy‐practice nexus. The paper applies institutional theory using a conceptual model by Tolbert and Zucker on the component processes of institutionalisation.

Findings

The findings suggest that institutional forces act as a driver and an inhibitor to introducing enabling technologies in the health‐care environment. A process analysis shows that, as electronic health records force disruptive change on clinicians, healthcare managers and patients, culturally embedded norms, values and behavioural patterns serve to impede the implementation process.

Research limitations/implications

This research is limited in its generalisability to national, regional and local ICT implementations due to the complexity of the policy and practical issues at stake. Despite the longitudinal research approach, the use of institutional theory can only offer a flavour of how institutionalised values, norms and behaviours influence health IT policy and practice.

Practical implications

The paper demonstrates the complexity of translating centralised ICT policy in healthcare to practical solutions for clinicians and other stakeholders. It shows how a large‐scale ICT programme based on procurement of technology is unlikely to succeed where important issues of user engagement and a sound “business case” have not been achieved.

Originality/value

This research contributes to the theoretical literature on institutionalism by addressing the dichotomy between institutional and technical environments. While technology is often discussed in isolation of an institutional process, it may become embedded in organisational practices, reaching a process of sedimentation (institutionalisation) or fail to take hold and fade from view.

Details

Journal of Enterprise Information Management, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0398

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 30 October 2023

Wendy Maragh Taylor

This chapter explores the parallels between the recruitment and retention of students from marginalized backgrounds, and efforts with similarly identifying faculty and student…

Abstract

This chapter explores the parallels between the recruitment and retention of students from marginalized backgrounds, and efforts with similarly identifying faculty and student affairs administrators. Higher education institutions target specific student populations to increase access, thus leading to an increase of students of color, low-income students, and first-generation students on college campuses (Chen & Nunnery, 2019). This welcome development proves inadequate on its own, as the critical support structures necessary for student success are not in place. Students' lived experiences are not attended to in a manner that fosters thriving (Jack, 2019; Nunn, 2021).

Research underscores the significant positive impact on marginalized students of having faculty and student-facing administrators from similar backgrounds on their campus (Braxton et al., 2014; Kuh, Kinzie, Buckley, Bridges, & Hayek, 2007). The intentional recruiting of these college personnel provides a vital means of attending to the needs of underrepresented students. Yet, the student experience is not instructive for the work with underrepresented college employees. The lived experiences of the faculty and administrators from marginalized identities are not being addressed either, similar to that of underrepresented students (Orelus, 2020). When these college personnel leave institutions unexpectedly or stay but are not thriving, this impacts students, colleagues and the college as a whole. In many respects, institutions are replicating inequities they commit to substantively dismantle, limiting the racial justice work they promised, and effectively thwarting their own Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion (DEI) efforts.

Using an autoethnographic approach, this chapter will explore these parallel issues, and propose recommendations for future research and institutional policy and practice for retention of underrepresented faculty and student-facing administrators.

Article
Publication date: 18 September 2009

Wendy James

The primary purpose of this paper is to put forward a framework grounded in new institutional sociology (NIS) theory that examines the impact of national competition policy on the…

1855

Abstract

Purpose

The primary purpose of this paper is to put forward a framework grounded in new institutional sociology (NIS) theory that examines the impact of national competition policy on the design and implementation of a balanced scorecard (BSC) in a government‐owned electricity corporation in Australia. It examines the importance of the rational analytical deliberation of legitimacy as a fundamental accompaniment to isomorphism in the continuing development of the new performance management system.

Design/methodology/approach

A single exploratory/descriptive case study with embedded multiple unit analysis is used in order to examine the adoption of a BSC as an example of the process of evolution of a new initiative. It uses DiMaggio and Powell's concept of isomorphism to explain the initial adoption of the BSC.

Findings

The paper highlights the importance of the deliberation of both rational analytical approaches and legitimacy as a fundamental accompaniment to isomorphism in the continuing development of accounting systems in the public sector.

Originality/value

These results provide useful insights into the criticism of NIS theory, that is, that it does not provide scope for organisations to adopt rationally technical practices as well as isomorphic behaviour for legitimacy.

Details

Journal of Accounting & Organizational Change, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1832-5912

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 24 August 2020

Alicia B. Wodika and Wendi K. Middleton

This study identified the attitudes and behaviors of college students regarding their advocacy for climate change adaptation and mitigation. Specifically, perceptions of climate…

1011

Abstract

Purpose

This study identified the attitudes and behaviors of college students regarding their advocacy for climate change adaptation and mitigation. Specifically, perceptions of climate change were assessed and advocacy activities were identified for climate change and/or other topics.

Design/methodology/approach

Using convenience sampling, students (n = 440) from three universities in the Midwest, the USA, completed surveys assessing their level of agreement with activities related to civic engagement, climate change and policy. Semantic differential scales focused on “learning about climate change,” “advocating for climate change mitigation” and “advocating for climate change adaptation.” Three open-ended questions were used to identify student experiences with civic engagement and/or service-learning, as well as topics in which they advocate and how they advocate.

Findings

Regarding advocacy in general, over 50% of the sample did not advocate for any topic, with 24.5% of students stating they advocated for the environment/climate change. Students who identified as female, democratic and 1st or 2nd year in school were more likely to be engaged with environmental advocacy. Regarding civic engagement, seniors were more actively engaged with their communities and also more likely to vote in local, state and national elections.

Research limitations/implications

Time of data collection was a potential limitation with schools conducting data collection at different time periods. Students who identified more progressive politically were also more likely to participate in the study.

Originality/value

While research exists regarding student civic engagement levels, this research project identified ways in which students engaged in advocacy, identifying potential links with civic engagement and enhanced participation in climate change adaptation and mitigation strategies.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 21 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 7 December 2020

Wendy K. Smith and Miguel Pina e Cunha

Scholars increasingly depict hybridity as pervasive across organizations. The authors offer insight about how paradox theory informs and expands this approach to hybridity. To do…

Abstract

Scholars increasingly depict hybridity as pervasive across organizations. The authors offer insight about how paradox theory informs and expands this approach to hybridity. To do so, the authors do a deeper dive into paradox theory, comparing and contrasting a dynamic equilibrium approach with a permanent dialectics approach. Integrating these two approaches offers paradox theory insights that can enrich and expand hybridity scholarship. The authors offer suggestions for how paradox theory can help develop a future research agenda for organizational hybridity.

Details

Organizational Hybridity: Perspectives, Processes, Promises
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-355-5

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 30 October 2023

Abstract

Details

Leadership in Turbulent Times
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83753-494-4

Book part
Publication date: 18 August 2014

Wendy Cukier, Suzanne Gagnon, Laura Mae Lindo, Charity Hannan and Sarah Amato

To explore how Critical Management Studies can be used to frame a strategy to effect change and promote diversity and inclusion in organizations.

Abstract

Purpose

To explore how Critical Management Studies can be used to frame a strategy to effect change and promote diversity and inclusion in organizations.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing on the experience gained from a large multi-sector action research project aimed at promoting equality, diversity and inclusion in organizations, this chapter proposes a multilayer [Critical] Ecological Model.

Findings

While early critical theorists were committed to effecting change, the rise of post-modern critical theory eroded the ground on which to stand, widening the gap between theory and practice. Secondly, the chapter asserts the importance of linking empirical research and critical theory in order to advance equality seeking projects. Thirdly, the chapter provides a [Critical] Ecological model that bridges theory and action in Critical Management Studies, based partly on experience from a large community-based research project. The need for a multifaceted approach to advance equality and inclusion emerged as a way to bridge ideological differences among actors and academics committed to effecting social change.

Practical implications

By addressing directly the challenges of theoretical rifts as well as differences in research focused on micro, meso and macro levels, the chapter builds a framework to allow different stakeholders – scholars, practitioners, activists and change agents across sectors – to take action in advancing inclusion and equality as well as an understanding of interactions between levels.

Originality/value

While sharing similar goals, many approaches to change are fragmented on the level of analysis and by underlying paradigms. This chapter is unique in its focus on ways to bridge theory and practice and to develop a framework for action that accommodates equality seeking theorists and activists working on several levels.

Details

Getting Things Done
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-954-6

Keywords

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