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Article
Publication date: 9 January 2020

Vickie Coleman Gallagher, Tracy H. Porter and Kevin P. Gallagher

Sustainability initiatives are important considerations for twenty-first century institutions. Employees, customers and other stakeholders expect responsible business…

Abstract

Purpose

Sustainability initiatives are important considerations for twenty-first century institutions. Employees, customers and other stakeholders expect responsible business practices that focus on people, profit and planet in unison. Sustainability efforts require a strong advocate who can champion relevant business practices and embed new practices within the culture and across the entire organization. The purpose of this paper is to explain the tangible actions described as necessary by change agents in order to move sustainability initiatives forward in their organizations. This research employs the narrative provided by these agents in interviews – to inform the activities outlined in an established model of political skill and reputation building. This analysis enables the model to illustrate the sequential patterns and process of events, i.e. antecedents and consequences that are simply assumed in the existing variance models.

Design/methodology/approach

This research is based on in-depth qualitative interviews with the sustainability managers from a variety of organization and industry contexts (e.g. building products, hospitals, banking, energy, environmental and manufacturing).

Findings

The exploration of sustainability initiatives reveals the importance of the change agent’s reputation for building trust in their organizations. Reputation is fostered through political skill and persuasion, while leveraging social capital.

Research limitations/implications

The research is rich in the depth of individual-level phenomena, thereby highlighting the skills necessary to enact change within a variety of industries. However, given the limited sample size, macro-level issues cannot be addressed.

Practical implications

Political skill is a teachable skill that is enhanced through mentoring and coaching. Sustainability initiatives and their organizations can benefit from leveraging persons with strong reputations to facilitate change. When lacking, persons with content knowledge can be groomed to grow their reputation, network, persuasion and political skills.

Social implications

Sustainability is vital to the future of our earth and humanity. Business and society would benefit from the growth of this phenomenon.

Originality/value

The authors aim to help change agents achieve their objectives through consideration of not just the goals, but the process as well.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 33 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 October 2016

Tracy H. Porter, Vickie Coleman Gallagher and Diane Lawong

Organizations have viewed sustainability as a societal problem and unrelated to business. To recognize sustainability as an organizational issue requires companies to deal…

Abstract

Purpose

Organizations have viewed sustainability as a societal problem and unrelated to business. To recognize sustainability as an organizational issue requires companies to deal with the challenge of transforming into environmentally sustainable enterprises. This requires institutions to align mission statements with values. The purpose of this paper is to replicate previous research in sustainability and the cultural facets which impact the process.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative case study method was used to analyze 25 organizations within the US Midwest with various contexts to determine how their respective cultures impacted their change initiatives. Specifically, the authors spoke to sustainability change agents with regard to their leadership and culture, and the factors that are conducive to (or barriers to) implementing sustainability initiatives.

Findings

The original study demonstrated the presence of seven contextual conditions which are important in the process of imbedding sustainability within the institution. This research found the same dimensions to be present; however, they manifested differently 15 years later.

Practical implications

The original research offered a somewhat dark picture of the sustainability change initiatives within organizations. The current study however; offers a much more positive perspective which demonstrates organizations appear to have progressed with regard to sustainability.

Originality/value

This is a replication study whereby we discovered similar themes as to the nature of contextual factors that can hinder or advance sustainability initiatives; however, the findings 15 years later show a marked difference in the current state of affairs and the ability to implement sustainability initiatives.

Details

American Journal of Business, vol. 31 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1935-5181

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 September 2016

Vickie Coleman Gallagher, James A. Meurs and Kenneth J. Harris

A number of studies have explored the benefits (e.g. enhanced job performance and reduced strain), of being politically skilled. Within the framework of uncertainty…

Abstract

Purpose

A number of studies have explored the benefits (e.g. enhanced job performance and reduced strain), of being politically skilled. Within the framework of uncertainty management theory, the purpose of this paper is to explore the benefits of high political skill to affective commitment, job satisfaction, and perceived job mobility, under conditions of distrust in management.

Design/methodology/approach

Sales representatives were surveyed and moderated multiple regression analyses were conducted to analyze the data.

Findings

The authors found that as distrust increased, affective commitment decreased for all persons, but was most pronounced for persons low on political skill. However, distrust in management had no impact on job satisfaction for those high on political skill, allowing persons high on political skill to enjoy their jobs despite high levels of distrust (an intrapsychic benefit of political skill). Finally, as distrust in management increased, persons high on political skill had increased perceived job mobility.

Research limitations/implications

This study is cross-sectional, limiting conclusions about causality in the relationships studied and leaving open the possibility of reverse causation.

Practical implications

This research has important implications, such that, under conditions of distrust, persons low on political skill are less committed, more dissatisfied, and feel a sense of job immobility, which could lead to poor work outcomes, such as decreased job performance.

Originality/value

The study is the first to examine how being politically skilled benefits employee outcomes when the employee distrusts management.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 21 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 19 August 2021

Vickie Coleman Gallagher, Lisa E. Baranik, Maria Hamdani, Sorin Valcea, Pakanat Kiratikosolrak and Anthony R. Wheeler

Multidimensional fit (MDF) has been coined as “elusive” and relevant to an individual’s social identity and self-concept, unfolding over time as individuals assess their…

Abstract

Multidimensional fit (MDF) has been coined as “elusive” and relevant to an individual’s social identity and self-concept, unfolding over time as individuals assess their fit relative to Person-Organization, Person-Vocation, Person-Job, and Person-Team Fit. In this chapter, the literature as it relates to the refugee employment journey, MDF, and HRM practices that facilitate or inhibit MDF is reviewed. Furthermore, in this study, the process-oriented view of the refuge path highlights the complexity of their experience, noting an array of antecedents as they relate to country, host country and individual differences, interventions through NGOs, refugee resettlement agencies, and organizations, as well as the less explored entrepreneurial path. These diverse paths and the process of finding fit, and the obstacles refugees face, are viewed through the lens of shocks and reassessment of MDF throughout their journey. Finally, the study’s outcomes illustrate individual wellbeing factors, organizational level benefits, as well as community level benefits to MDF.

Article
Publication date: 10 February 2012

Kevin P. Gallagher and Vickie Coleman Gallagher

The importance of involving subject matter experts (SMEs) in ERP implementations is well established. SMEs' knowledge of business and system processes are critical to…

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Abstract

Purpose

The importance of involving subject matter experts (SMEs) in ERP implementations is well established. SMEs' knowledge of business and system processes are critical to conducting gap analyses and configuring enterprise systems. But what happens to SMEs on completion of the implementation phase? Prior qualitative research found that some organizations return SMEs to their old department, which can contribute to knowledge transfer; while other organizations retain the services of SMEs, to assist in ongoing efforts with support and enhancement of the systems. The purpose of this study is to understand post‐implementation organizational choices – when SMEs are retained and returned. The aim is to understand these choices relative to the goals of their project. Theoretically, organizations that return SMEs move toward a distributed or hybrid model, while organizations that retain SMEs employ a centralized functional‐support structure. In accordance with contingency theory, these structural choices should align with an organization's goals and measures of success.

Design/methodology/approach

This research conceptually builds on prior qualitative research, but is still exploratory in nature. The authors report on findings from an online survey conducted with 65 organizations. The sample included small, medium and large firms. Respondents were key decision‐makers in their organization's ERP initiatives (directors and managers) recruited from two user‐group associations (higher education and health care), primarily from the USA and Canada. Descriptive statistics and t‐tests (when appropriate) were utilized to analyze and report the findings.

Findings

The hybrid structure (neither completely centralized nor decentralized) was utilized most often (66 percent of the organizations in the sample). The organization's original goals and measures of success did not seem to dictate the final organizational structure, as would be predicted by contingency theory. The authors interpret this as an indication that the choice of structural form is not easily explained based on goals and objectives. They conjecture that devising a structural approach to supporting such a complex inter‐functional system such as ERP requires solving many complex simultaneous organizational problems.

Research limitations/implications

This research involves a small sample of 65 organizations and is exploratory in nature; hence, it may not be projectable to a larger population. Future research should supplement this study with more industry user groups, expand the sample size, and utilize more advanced statistical methods.

Originality/value

Previous research has focused on successfully implementing ERP, neglecting post‐implementation design. This study contributes to a growing body of work with regard to post‐implementation design, taking into consideration SMEs and reporting structure, goals, and measures of success utilizing contingency theory as the backdrop.

Book part
Publication date: 19 August 2021

Abstract

Details

Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80117-430-5

Article
Publication date: 20 February 2007

Anthony R. Wheeler, Vickie Coleman Gallagher, Robyn L. Brouer and Chris J. Sablynski

The present study examined the relationships between P‐O fit, job satisfaction, perceived job mobility, and intent to turnover. It was hypothesized that job satisfaction…

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Abstract

Purpose

The present study examined the relationships between P‐O fit, job satisfaction, perceived job mobility, and intent to turnover. It was hypothesized that job satisfaction mediated the P‐O fit‐intent to turnover relationship and that perceived job mobility moderated the job satisfaction‐intent to turnover relationship such that the combined effect of high job dissatisfaction and high perceived job mobility predicted intent to turnover.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were obtained utilizing a field survey from a sample of 205 full‐time employed adults working in two geographic regions in the USA. Participants completed an HTML‐based web survey that contained measures of the constructs of interest to this study.

Findings

Mediated and moderated regression analyses revealed statistical support for the hypothesized relationships, which were interpreted as evidence that P‐O misfit and job dissatisfaction do not necessarily lead to intent to turnover.

Research limitations/implications

The potential for common method variability was present in the study, the impact of which could either attenuate or inflate estimated statistical relationships.

Practical implications

While P‐O fit researchers typically associate misfit with decreased job satisfaction and increased turnover, the present research suggests that intervening variables, such as job mobility, influence employee intentions to turnover.

Originality/value

The phenomenon of misfit is understudied in larger context of P‐O fit; thus this research represents one of the first studies in this area of research.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 22 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 24 October 2008

Vickie Coleman Gallagher, Kenneth J. Harris and Matthew Valle

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between job tension (JT) and the use of intimidation in the workplace, as well as positive and negative…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between job tension (JT) and the use of intimidation in the workplace, as well as positive and negative affectivity as two potential personality trait moderators of this relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper hypothesizes that employees would use more intimidation when they perceive higher levels of JT based on a fight response. Furthermore, it hypothesizes that when JT was high, people high in negative affectivity would use more intimidation in the workplace due to trait activation, whereas individuals high in positive affectivity would use less intimidation due to greater resource pools. The hypotheses was tested with a sample of 134 employees from a wide range of occupations and industries who completed an online survey measuring their levels of felt JT, usage of intimidation behaviors, and self‐reported affectivity.

Findings

Hierarchical moderated regression analyses revealed that JT was positively related to intimidation usage. The analyses also showed support for negative affectivity as a moderator, such that high levels of intimidation occurred when JT and negative affectivity were both high. Positive affectivity did not moderate the relationship.

Originality/value

Although persons high in negative affectivity are particularly vulnerable to the effects of JT, organizations must be aware of the potential for behaviors (e.g. intimidation) that can result from felt tension. Prior research has primarily viewed tension as an outcome variable; the research conceptualizes tension as an antecedent in the stressor‐strain‐outcome paradigm. Intimidation is shown to be an outcome of workplace tension – a behavioral reaction to psychological strain that is an attempt to protect valued resources.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 13 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 February 2007

Michael J. Morley

The purpose of the paper is to introduce the special issue that brings together six papers exploring aspects of person‐organization fit.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the paper is to introduce the special issue that brings together six papers exploring aspects of person‐organization fit.

Design/methodology/approach

This overarching paper contextualizes the theme and introduces the selected papers.

Findings

The findings in this paper vary according to the core theme of each of the six contributions.

Originality/value

Combined the papers explore new avenues of enquiry in the person‐organization (P‐O) fit domain and showcase international theoretical and empirical work on the P‐O fit construct.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 22 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

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