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Article
Publication date: 28 December 2018

Mohamad Abu Ghazaleh, Salam Abdallah and Mehmood Khan

Despite the wide recognition of enterprise resource planning’s (ERP’s) multiple uses, little research has examined the internal forces that influence success after ERP…

Abstract

Purpose

Despite the wide recognition of enterprise resource planning’s (ERP’s) multiple uses, little research has examined the internal forces that influence success after ERP implementation in the service industry. This study aims to identify the factors influencing post-implementation ERP capabilities (PERPC) and improving post-implementation sustainability and user satisfaction (PERPSUS). Exploratory factor analysis (EFA) and confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) are used for this, with advance managed outsourced solutions (AMOS) and an entanglement view of all firm ERP users.

Design/methodology/approach

A theoretical model is created to explain internal organizational factors impacting post-implementation ERP sustainability and user satisfaction. Data were collected from 152 executive ERP users in two organizations in the UAE. Two CFA models were created.

Findings

The results show that adoption by internal organizational forces leads to more sustainable post-implementation ERP. A 69 per cent variance in user satisfaction and post-implementation ERP sustainability was found through a PERPC model and its dimensions, which are significantly highly correlated.

Research limitations/implications

ERP professionals and stakeholders believe that identification of ERP capabilities (ERPCs) and user satisfaction must be multi-dimensional.

Practical implications

CIOs and ERP professionals could use these results to increase the success of ERP in the service industry, and they can support the inclusion of post-implementation ERP practices.

Originality/value

Using AMOS, this paper explores the role of ERPCs in system sustainability and user satisfaction in the service sector, utilizing stakeholder perspectives and an entanglement view of ERP users in the service industry.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 27 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

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Article
Publication date: 3 October 2019

Mohamad Abu Ghazaleh, Salam Abdallah and Abdelrahim Zabadi

Despite the importance of post-implementation activities to support the success of an enterprise resource planning (ERP) system, there has been a lack of research into the…

Abstract

Purpose

Despite the importance of post-implementation activities to support the success of an enterprise resource planning (ERP) system, there has been a lack of research into the factors that influences post-implementation success. Accordingly, this paper aims to present a case study on a public service organization operating in an emerging market economy, namely, the United Arab Emirates in the ERP post-implementation phase to understand the internal forces within the organization that influences ERP system success.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative method using focus group discussions (FGDs) was conducted based upon IT data from the firm and interviews with IT staff, business users and executive management to identify system users’ perceptions in post ERP.

Findings

The authors posit that the internal organizational forces of ongoing support, system user interactions and stakeholder views significantly affect post-implementation capabilities and user satisfaction.

Research limitations/implications

IT professionals and stakeholders believe that identification of the factors determining post-implementation ERP capabilities and user satisfaction should not be limited to specific practices.

Practical implications

This study provides insights that can assist CIOs and ERP professionals in the service industry to examine the extent of obstructions to post-implementation capabilities that will impact system user satisfaction.

Originality/value

Use of FGDs to explore the impact of ERP capabilities upon system user satisfaction in the service sector. The study is one of the first that utilizes Technological frames of reference (TFR) theory in studying ERP post-implementation.

Details

Journal of Systems and Information Technology, vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1328-7265

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Article
Publication date: 24 February 2012

Kevin P. Gallagher, James L. “Jamey” Worrell and Robert M. Mason

For an organization to realize the intended benefits of an enternprise resource planning (ERP) investment, it must integrate both technical expertise and functional area…

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Abstract

Purpose

For an organization to realize the intended benefits of an enternprise resource planning (ERP) investment, it must integrate both technical expertise and functional area knowledge, and it must have continuing support after implementation. The study aims to expand understanding of how organizations ensure the necessary support from functional experts during and after ERP installations. In particular, the study aims to address the question of the type of horizontal support mechanism chosen for this support and how managers make these choices.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is a replicated case study based on interviews with project leaders in nine universities judged to have successful PeopleSoft ERP implementations. Thematic analysis is applied to identify the factors influencing managerial choices and organizational decisions made to assure post‐implementation ERP support.

Findings

The findings indicate that managers of ERP implementations recognize the necessity for horizontal coordinating mechanisms both during and after implementation. The paper finds no single “best” structure in the cases, nor does it observe that the support structure decision is always based on a deliberate organizational strategy. The findings indicate that selection of post‐implementation support structure is often a negotiated outcome. Ultimately, the paper finds that the outcomes were based on three factors: the situated context of the original implementation project goals; the nature of early commitments made to functional subject matter experts and their departments; and the initial project structure used during the implementation phase.

Originality/value

This research fills a gap in research on ERP support structures by examining how localized organizations assure the necessary support from subject matter experts, commencing with project inception and continuing through post‐implementation. The results contribute to theory by illustrating the value of a process‐based approach to understanding the factors that affect the choice of support structures. The findings contribute to practice by highlighting how early management decisions and the methods executives chose to assure commitments from key stakeholders can restrict the range of options for post‐implementation organizational structures.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

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Article
Publication date: 10 February 2012

Kevin P. Gallagher and Vickie Coleman Gallagher

The importance of involving subject matter experts (SMEs) in ERP implementations is well established. SMEs' knowledge of business and system processes are critical to…

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4022

Abstract

Purpose

The importance of involving subject matter experts (SMEs) in ERP implementations is well established. SMEs' knowledge of business and system processes are critical to conducting gap analyses and configuring enterprise systems. But what happens to SMEs on completion of the implementation phase? Prior qualitative research found that some organizations return SMEs to their old department, which can contribute to knowledge transfer; while other organizations retain the services of SMEs, to assist in ongoing efforts with support and enhancement of the systems. The purpose of this study is to understand post‐implementation organizational choices – when SMEs are retained and returned. The aim is to understand these choices relative to the goals of their project. Theoretically, organizations that return SMEs move toward a distributed or hybrid model, while organizations that retain SMEs employ a centralized functional‐support structure. In accordance with contingency theory, these structural choices should align with an organization's goals and measures of success.

Design/methodology/approach

This research conceptually builds on prior qualitative research, but is still exploratory in nature. The authors report on findings from an online survey conducted with 65 organizations. The sample included small, medium and large firms. Respondents were key decision‐makers in their organization's ERP initiatives (directors and managers) recruited from two user‐group associations (higher education and health care), primarily from the USA and Canada. Descriptive statistics and t‐tests (when appropriate) were utilized to analyze and report the findings.

Findings

The hybrid structure (neither completely centralized nor decentralized) was utilized most often (66 percent of the organizations in the sample). The organization's original goals and measures of success did not seem to dictate the final organizational structure, as would be predicted by contingency theory. The authors interpret this as an indication that the choice of structural form is not easily explained based on goals and objectives. They conjecture that devising a structural approach to supporting such a complex inter‐functional system such as ERP requires solving many complex simultaneous organizational problems.

Research limitations/implications

This research involves a small sample of 65 organizations and is exploratory in nature; hence, it may not be projectable to a larger population. Future research should supplement this study with more industry user groups, expand the sample size, and utilize more advanced statistical methods.

Originality/value

Previous research has focused on successfully implementing ERP, neglecting post‐implementation design. This study contributes to a growing body of work with regard to post‐implementation design, taking into consideration SMEs and reporting structure, goals, and measures of success utilizing contingency theory as the backdrop.

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Article
Publication date: 13 March 2017

Guo Chao Peng and Miguel Nunes

The purpose of this paper is to propose a systematic and customisable framework, titled the 9D approach, aiming to evaluate the enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to propose a systematic and customisable framework, titled the 9D approach, aiming to evaluate the enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems as well as to identify potential socio-technical problems, misfits and deficiencies that can cause ERP failure during the system post-implementation phase.

Design/methodology/approach

The proposed 9D ERP evaluation framework includes nine dimensions and 85 evaluation criteria. This theoretical framework is then used in a six-step evaluation process based on a mixed-methods design. A case study involving a large-size private company in China was used as an exemplification to illustrate how the proposed 9D approach can be applied in practices.

Findings

The findings of the study clearly demonstrated that after the ERP “go-live” point, companies still experience many challenges and problems in the post-implementation phase. These problems can be located in very diverse organisational, systemic and personnel aspects of the company, as well as across different functional areas and organisational levels. The proposed 9D approach was demonstrated to be an efficient and systematic tool to investigate and explore such ERP problems in an in-depth level within the organisational context.

Research limitations/implications

This study contributes to the theory of IS evaluation in general, and provides valuable insights into the ERP post-implementation evaluation in particular.

Practical implications

The proposed ERP evaluation approach forms a sound base for continuous ERP improvement and contributes to sustain seamless alignment between ERP and its organisational context. The customisable feature of the framework offers flexibility and enables its use by companies of all sizes, any sector, and any country.

Originality/value

To the best of the researchers’ knowledge, this is the most extensive and comprehensive framework for the post-evaluation of ERPs proposed hitherto. The need for this new framework was grounded on the argumentation of the drawbacks of existing ERP measurement and evaluation studies that simply focus on success rather than the more critical failure factors.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 117 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

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Article
Publication date: 4 December 2017

Marco Comuzzi and Minou Parhizkar

Enterprise systems (ESs) are hard to maintain, since they embed a large fraction of organisational data and tasks, which are often intertwined and highly interdependent…

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1908

Abstract

Purpose

Enterprise systems (ESs) are hard to maintain, since they embed a large fraction of organisational data and tasks, which are often intertwined and highly interdependent. The purpose of this paper is to propose a methodology for enterprise resource planning (ERP) post-implementation change management to support business analysts during perfective maintenance.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology draws a parallel line with engineering change management and considers the steps of mapping the dependencies among ES components, understanding the ripple effects of change, and defining metrics to quantify and assess the impact of change. The methodology is instantiated in the case of ERP systems, for which a tool has also been implemented and evaluated by ERP implementation experts.

Findings

Experts positively evaluated the proposed methodology. General design principles to instantiate the methodology in the case of systems other than ERP have been derived.

Originality/value

While existing ESs change management methodologies help to identify the need for change, the proposed methodology help to structure the change process, supporting the task of perfective maintenance in an efficient way.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 117 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

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Article
Publication date: 2 March 2015

Sue Abdinnour and Khawaja Saeed

The purpose of this paper is to explore how key users’ perceptions (capability, value, timing, and acceptance) toward an Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) system change…

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2601

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore how key users’ perceptions (capability, value, timing, and acceptance) toward an Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) system change from the pre-implementation to the post-implementation phase. The paper also examines how this change differs with varying levels of user involvement in the implementation process and users’ positions in the company.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors survey the employees of a major aircraft manufacturing company in the Midwest and analyze the data using repeated measures ANOVA. The authors use time as a within-subject independent variable, and involvement/position at the company as between-subject independent variables.

Findings

The results reveal a significant drop in users’ perceptions regarding the capability, value, and implementation timing of the ERP system. However, the perception of acceptance did not change significantly. Furthermore, there were more significant interactions of users’ perceptions with employee position than employee involvement in the implementation process.

Research limitations/implications

The study offers a better theoretical understanding of how users’ perceptions regarding an ERP system evolve over time. The use of one company is a limitation of the study, so future research can focus on extending the study in different sectors.

Practical implications

Management can design interventions to minimize users’ negative perceptions about the ERP system and increase usage in the post-implementation phase. For example, management can design training customized toward users’ positions in the company.

Originality/value

Post-implementation research in the ERP field is rare. Conducting a survey of users’ perceptions allows the authors to take an in-depth look at attitudes toward an ERP system.

Details

Journal of Enterprise Information Management, vol. 28 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0398

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Article
Publication date: 13 July 2015

Razatulshima Ghazali, Mohammad Nazir Ahmad and Nor Hidayati Zakaria

The purpose of this paper is to show empirically how knowledge management, particularly knowledge integration (KI), acts as a mediator between different leadership styles…

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1070

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to show empirically how knowledge management, particularly knowledge integration (KI), acts as a mediator between different leadership styles and Enterprise Systems (ES) success. It proposes a model of KI as a mediator between two leadership styles (the transformational and transactional leadership styles). The study also aims to expose the most relevant leadership styles to be practiced by leaders when managing the ES post-implementation stage.

Design/methodology/approach

Valid data were collected from 263 survey respondents in Malaysian companies. The authors employed structural equation modelling and used the path modelling approach to investigate the underlying relationships between the variables. The authors then tested the mediating effects of KI by using the bootstrapping procedures proposed by Preacher and Hayes, which suits the path analysis method.

Findings

The results provide empirical evidence on the relationships between the variables and on the role of KI mechanisms as a mediator between leadership styles and ES success, especially in the ES post-implementation phase. Both leadership styles have to be practiced by leaders while managing an ES.

Research limitations/implications

Future research can investigate the role of KI mechanisms as moderators between both leadership styles. The study can also be expanded by looking in-depth at other leadership styles.

Practical implications

This paper is useful for management researchers and as a guide to management practice for business managers.

Originality/value

This paper proposes a model that examines the vitality of KI effect in ES post-implementation stage by different leadership styles. The results expose the importance of leaders’ adoption of KI mechanisms and call for manager attention to the importance of using the right leadership styles when managing ES.

Details

Journal of Enterprise Information Management, vol. 28 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0398

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Article
Publication date: 14 November 2019

Nesrine Chtourou Ben Amar and Randa Ben Romdhane

Information systems (IS) strategic alignment is a significant chief information officers (CIO) and top management issue because of its impact on a firm’s performance and…

Abstract

Purpose

Information systems (IS) strategic alignment is a significant chief information officers (CIO) and top management issue because of its impact on a firm’s performance and profitability. Previous studies have primarily examined informal dimension’s influence on IS strategic alignment. Nevertheless, a few research works have emphasised cultural dimension’s effect. The purpose of this paper is to empirically investigate and bring out organisational culture’s influence on IS strategic alignment. Notably, it highlights the most significant culture types, according to the Competing Value Framework (Cameron et al., 2006).

Design/methodology/approach

Empirical setting comprises a quantitative approach using a survey based on a sample of 160 business managers (BMs) of 53 large companies located in Tunisia with international activities and being in the post-implementation operational use phase of their enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems. The partial least square (PLS) method has been used for data analysis.

Findings

The results provide an empirical evidence supporting a positive and significant organisational culture’s influence on the IS strategic alignment. The findings also show that “Clan Culture” (Internal/Flexibility-oriented culture) positively influences IS alignment along with the strategic priorities. These findings provide guidance and help understand how, through clan culture, the company can contribute significantly to the success of its ERP systems strategic alignment during the most critical phase, namely, post-implementation.

Originality/value

Despite abundant work related to IS alignment topic, little research, to the authors’ knowledge, has been undertaken in considering organisational culture’s influence. Thus, this research aims to fill this gap and to raise new questions about IS alignment. First, this study puts together organisational culture (through the Competing values Framework) and strategic alignment (through the IS use dimension) in a single research model to analyse four culture types’ direct effect on IS alignment. Second, this study is innovative in its use of the ERP post-implementation as an empirical framework. The post-implementation phase is often played down in research work in favour of the upstream pre-implementation phases. Furthermore, the findings bring together theoretical and practical insights on both IS-business strategic alignment and ERP post-implementation. Thus, future research could emphasise the role of clan culture in the efficiency of ERP systems strategic alignment during the usage phase. Building on these findings, BM, CIO and top management are advised to promote this culture type based on communication, information sharing and the spirit of internal partnership – so that their ERP systems are used appropriately and aligned with the company’s strategic priorities.

Details

Journal of Enterprise Information Management, vol. 33 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0398

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Article
Publication date: 25 September 2009

Guo Chao Peng and Miguel Baptista Nunes

The purpose of this paper is to identify, assess and explore potential risks that Chinese companies may encounter when using, maintaining and enhancing their enterprise…

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2482

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify, assess and explore potential risks that Chinese companies may encounter when using, maintaining and enhancing their enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems in the post‐implementation phase.

Design/methodology/approach

The study adopts a deductive research design based on a cross‐sectional questionnaire survey. This survey is preceded by a political, economic, social and technological analysis and a set of strength, weakness, opportunity and threat analyses, from which the researchers refine the research context and select state‐owned enterprises (SOEs) in the electronic and telecommunications industry in Guangdong province as target companies to carry out the research. The questionnaire design is based on a theoretical risk ontology drawn from a critical literature review process. The questionnaire is sent to 118 selected Chinese SOEs, from which 42 (84 questionnaires) valid and usable responses are received and analysed.

Findings

The findings identify a set of 40 ERP exploitation risks, which concentrate around operational, analytical, organisation‐wide and technical issues. The top ten identified ERP risks and associated causes and consequences are discussed extensively in this paper. The study also explores and identifies ten statistical correlations between the risks identified.

Research limitations/implications

This study contributes to the knowledge of ERP in general, and provides valuable insights into ERP exploitation risks in Chinese SOEs in particular.

Practical implications

The findings can be used by practitioners for the management and prevention of potential risks in ERP post‐implementation.

Originality/value

The need for the research emerges from the growing awareness in the field that there is a scarcity of studies focusing on ERP post‐implementation, in contrast with an over‐abundance of studies focusing on implementation and project management aspects.

Details

Journal of Enterprise Information Management, vol. 22 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0398

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