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Article
Publication date: 2 March 2021

Elena Zubielevitch, Helena D. Cooper–Thomas and Gordon W. Cheung

The growing instability of the labor market will almost certainly result in more employees whose values misfit with their organization’s. This paper draws from the…

Abstract

Purpose

The growing instability of the labor market will almost certainly result in more employees whose values misfit with their organization’s. This paper draws from the exit-neglect-voice-loyalty model to examine a broader range of responses to misfit; explores sociopolitical resources as the mechanisms through which misfit transmits its effects and investigates job mobility as a boundary condition enhancing or constraining responses to misfit.

Design/methodology/approach

A novel model (N = 152 New Zealand employees) examined links from misfit to two sociopolitical resources (perceived influence and organizational responsiveness) and from these to exit-neglect-voice-loyalty moderated by job mobility. Supplemental analyses examine moderated-mediation.

Findings

Misfit negatively predicted both sociopolitical resources, perceived influence and organizational responsiveness. Moderated-mediation analyses showed that the constructive reactions to misfit (voice and loyalty) were predicted conditionally at low levels of job mobility and indirectly via the respective sociopolitical resources. In contrast, destructive reactions to misfit (exit and neglect) were predicted directly, with neglect predicted at high levels of job mobility.

Research limitations/implications

Implications for human resource practitioners highlight the deleterious repercussions of misfit but also include the conditions under which misfit employees may attempt to constructively salvage their employment relationship.

Originality/value

This study integrates a broader set of concurrent responses to misfit using the exit-neglect-voice-loyalty typology, as well as introducing sociopolitical perspectives to the literature on misfit.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 36 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 20 February 2007

Anthony R. Wheeler, Vickie Coleman Gallagher, Robyn L. Brouer and Chris J. Sablynski

The present study examined the relationships between P‐O fit, job satisfaction, perceived job mobility, and intent to turnover. It was hypothesized that job satisfaction…

Abstract

Purpose

The present study examined the relationships between P‐O fit, job satisfaction, perceived job mobility, and intent to turnover. It was hypothesized that job satisfaction mediated the P‐O fit‐intent to turnover relationship and that perceived job mobility moderated the job satisfaction‐intent to turnover relationship such that the combined effect of high job dissatisfaction and high perceived job mobility predicted intent to turnover.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were obtained utilizing a field survey from a sample of 205 full‐time employed adults working in two geographic regions in the USA. Participants completed an HTML‐based web survey that contained measures of the constructs of interest to this study.

Findings

Mediated and moderated regression analyses revealed statistical support for the hypothesized relationships, which were interpreted as evidence that P‐O misfit and job dissatisfaction do not necessarily lead to intent to turnover.

Research limitations/implications

The potential for common method variability was present in the study, the impact of which could either attenuate or inflate estimated statistical relationships.

Practical implications

While P‐O fit researchers typically associate misfit with decreased job satisfaction and increased turnover, the present research suggests that intervening variables, such as job mobility, influence employee intentions to turnover.

Originality/value

The phenomenon of misfit is understudied in larger context of P‐O fit; thus this research represents one of the first studies in this area of research.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 22 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Article
Publication date: 12 September 2016

Vickie Coleman Gallagher, James A. Meurs and Kenneth J. Harris

A number of studies have explored the benefits (e.g. enhanced job performance and reduced strain), of being politically skilled. Within the framework of uncertainty…

Abstract

Purpose

A number of studies have explored the benefits (e.g. enhanced job performance and reduced strain), of being politically skilled. Within the framework of uncertainty management theory, the purpose of this paper is to explore the benefits of high political skill to affective commitment, job satisfaction, and perceived job mobility, under conditions of distrust in management.

Design/methodology/approach

Sales representatives were surveyed and moderated multiple regression analyses were conducted to analyze the data.

Findings

The authors found that as distrust increased, affective commitment decreased for all persons, but was most pronounced for persons low on political skill. However, distrust in management had no impact on job satisfaction for those high on political skill, allowing persons high on political skill to enjoy their jobs despite high levels of distrust (an intrapsychic benefit of political skill). Finally, as distrust in management increased, persons high on political skill had increased perceived job mobility.

Research limitations/implications

This study is cross-sectional, limiting conclusions about causality in the relationships studied and leaving open the possibility of reverse causation.

Practical implications

This research has important implications, such that, under conditions of distrust, persons low on political skill are less committed, more dissatisfied, and feel a sense of job immobility, which could lead to poor work outcomes, such as decreased job performance.

Originality/value

The study is the first to examine how being politically skilled benefits employee outcomes when the employee distrusts management.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 21 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

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Book part
Publication date: 28 December 2018

John A. Bishop, Haiyong Liu and Juan Gabriel Rodríguez

There are conflicting views of the primary role of income inequality in economic development. Many expect that higher income shares at the top reflect substantial economic…

Abstract

There are conflicting views of the primary role of income inequality in economic development. Many expect that higher income shares at the top reflect substantial economic contributions while others think that these increases in top shares have not translated into higher economic growth. Recently, this debate has been reinvigorated by a new proposal: higher income inequality could hurt economic performance by decreasing future intergenerational mobility. We contribute to this debate by examining the relationship between intergenerational perceived job status mobility and past income inequality. We find a robust negative association of lagged income inequality with upward intergenerational job status mobility and a robust positive association of lagged income inequality with downward intergenerational job status mobility. In addition, we find that the quality of political institutions and religious fractionalization both contribute positively to job status mobility. Higher levels of past Gross Domestic Product (GDP) result in less upward job status mobility and more downward job status mobility.

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Article
Publication date: 11 June 2018

Shih Yung Chou

The purpose of this paper is to develop a theoretical model describing how immigrant employees’ organizational citizenship behaviors (OCBs) are influenced by their…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop a theoretical model describing how immigrant employees’ organizational citizenship behaviors (OCBs) are influenced by their immigrant status. Additionally, this study attempts to explore the mediating role of perceived job mobility as well as the moderating role of organizational tenure in the relationship between immigrant status and OCBs.

Design/methodology/approach

A conceptual analysis was performed.

Findings

Drawing upon social identity, self-categorization, and impression management theories, this study proposes the following. First, an immigrant employee’s perceived different categorization of employment and organizational status will have a negative impact on his or her challenge-oriented OCB. Second, an immigrant employee’s perceived categorization of employment and organizational status will have a positive impact on his or her affiliation-oriented OCB. Third, perceived job mobility mediates the relationship between the perceived different categorization of employment and organizational status and challenge- and affiliation-oriented OCBs of an immigrant employee. Finally, an immigrant employee’s organizational tenure weakens (or strengthens) the negative (or positive) impact of immigrant status on challenge-oriented (or affiliation-oriented) OCB.

Originality/value

From a theoretical standpoint, this study provides a novel theoretical base that guides future research on immigrant employees’ OCBs in organizations. More importantly, this study offers recommendations that help maximize the effectiveness of immigrant employee’s OCBs.

Details

Journal of Global Mobility: The Home of Expatriate Management Research, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-8799

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 28 December 2018

Abstract

Details

Inequality, Taxation and Intergenerational Transmission
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-458-9

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Article
Publication date: 11 May 2015

Yui-tim Wong, Yui-Woon Wong and Chi-sum Wong

The purpose of this study is to attempt to fill a research gap by proposing an integrative model for studying employees’ turnover intention in Chinese joint ventures…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to attempt to fill a research gap by proposing an integrative model for studying employees’ turnover intention in Chinese joint ventures (JVs). The authors also examine the antecedents of turnover intention and its impact on employees’ performance.

Design/methodology/approach

A data set consisting of 247 employees in 3 JVs in the Peoples’ Republic of China is used to test the hypotheses.

Findings

The LISREL results support all hypotheses. The model examines how the contextual experiences of perceived organizational support and affective commitment might affect the turnover intention. It is proposed that employees’ perceived distributive justice, trust in management and job security are related to the organizational experience of perceived organizational support and affective commitment, which will affect turnover intention and, in turn, to job performance. The empirical results show that turnover intention has a significant and negative impact on employees’ performance, and both perceived organisational support (POS) and affective commitment have partial mediation effects between trust in management and employees’ turnover intention.

Research limitations/implications

The Western POS scale was used in this study. It may not fully capture the meaning of POS in the Chinese setting. Future research may develop indigenous POS measurement. Additionally, the scale on turnover intention only showed employees’ intention to leave, it did not reveal their subsequent actual turnover. Future research should use a longitudinal design to study the actual employee turnover. It contributes to the literature by offering insights on how Chinese human resource management practices in JVs affect employees’ turnover intention and the impact of turnover intention on employees’ performance in Chinese JVs.

Originality/value

This study enhances the authors' understanding of the relationship among POS, affective commitment and turnover intention of Chinese JV employees.

Details

Journal of Chinese Human Resource Management, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8005

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Article
Publication date: 16 October 2017

Chong-Hoe Kim and Byung Il Park

The purpose of this paper is to pinpoint key conduits promoting knowledge spillovers through inward foreign direct investment in the banking sector.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to pinpoint key conduits promoting knowledge spillovers through inward foreign direct investment in the banking sector.

Design/methodology/approach

The data were obtained by a survey. The survey data were collected from managers of five major local banks in Korea. The survey was conducted during May 10-June 30, 2015 with a total of 581 self-administered responses finally collected at the end (response rate: 60.5 percent).

Findings

Based on the survey data collected from the survey, the results indicate that knowledge spillovers from foreign to local banks occur in the Korean context. Demonstration effect, worker mobility and absorptive capacity of local banks are found to be effective conduits for knowledge spillovers. In addition, the authors have also found that competitive pressure negatively influences worker mobility leading to knowledge spillovers while two other elements (i.e. demonstration effect and absorptive capacity) positively mediate the relationship between competitive pressure and knowledge spillovers.

Practical implications

It is essential for the managers of multinational banks vigorously consider placing a strong emphasis on security of internal information and management of own personnel as the knowledge outflow through the demonstration effect and worker mobility is critical. For the managers of local banks, the discoveries suggest that active investment in human resources to maximize knowledge spillovers through the demonstration effect and through absorptive capacity is heightened by building an internal knowledge base.

Originality/value

The study contributes to the extant literature in the field of international business in two key ways. First, it examines the knowledge spillovers in the banking sector, a regulated industry, in Korea where empirical research is sparse. This paper’s second contribution is the finding of the key conduits of knowledge spillover phenomena by predicting and identifying the elements which affect the magnitude of knowledge flows from foreign to local banks.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 55 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 9 September 2020

Maria Gribling and Joanne Duberley

The purpose of this article is to compare the effects of global competitive pressures on the UK and French B-schools' management systems through the lens of career ecosystems.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to compare the effects of global competitive pressures on the UK and French B-schools' management systems through the lens of career ecosystems.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a qualitative inquiry employing in-depth, semi-structured interviews with 44 business school academics in the two countries.

Findings

This paper demonstrates the importance of top-down and bottom-up ecosystem influences for creating contrasting performance management systems in competitive B-schools in the two countries, to different outcomes for institutions and faculty careers.

Research limitations/implications

The authors focus on faculty working in top business schools, which limits the generalizability of the findings. Future research could apply the ecosystem lens to other institutions and geographical areas to highlight best practices and evaluate their transferability across borders.

Practical implications

The study highlights alternative HR practices and potentially workable adjustments to current systems that could be envisaged in order to enhance performance of individuals and institutions without jeopardizing the chances of valuable human resources to bring their contributions to the success of B-schools.

Originality/value

This paper compares and contrasts different performance management systems, taking into account exogenous and endogenous influences on B-schools that operate in a highly competitive and rapidly changing global management education market.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2002

Thomas M. Begley, Cynthia Lee, Yongqing Fang and Jianfeng Li

Power distance was tested as a moderator of the relationship between justice concerns and employee outcomes in a sample of employees in the People’s Republic of China. Two…

Abstract

Power distance was tested as a moderator of the relationship between justice concerns and employee outcomes in a sample of employees in the People’s Republic of China. Two hypotheses were developed based on the quality of authority‐member relations prescribed by the relational model of authority in groups. In two‐way interactions, higher power distance combined with procedural justice to predict employee outcomes, whereas lower power distance combined with distributive justice.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 17 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

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