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Book part
Publication date: 21 November 2014

Marco A. Barrenechea-Méndez, Pedro Ortín-Ángel and Eduardo C. Rodes-Mayor

This chapter provides further evidence on the role of uncertainty and job complexity in pay-for-performance and autonomy decisions. It proposes an encompassing econometric…

Abstract

This chapter provides further evidence on the role of uncertainty and job complexity in pay-for-performance and autonomy decisions. It proposes an encompassing econometric approach in order to explain the differences in previous outcomes that may be due to differing methodological approaches. The main stylized fact is that autonomy and pay-for-performance are positively associated. Additionally, autonomy is positively related to job complexity and uncertainty suggesting that the relationship between these latter variables and pay-for-performance could be through autonomy. After controlling for autonomy, the positive relationship between pay-for-performance and job complexity disappears, while that between pay-for-performance and uncertainty becomes more negative.

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International Perspectives on Participation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-169-5

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Article
Publication date: 9 March 2015

Efosa E. Uyiomendo and Markeset Tore

The purpose of this paper is to propose a multi-variable analysis (MVA) model for predicting potential delays in the delivery of subsea inspection, maintenance and repair…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to propose a multi-variable analysis (MVA) model for predicting potential delays in the delivery of subsea inspection, maintenance and repair (IMR) services.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on data from 351 subsea IMR service jobs executed between 2006 and 2008, a MVA model is proposed for predicting the potential delays in the delivery of IMR services in different plausible scenarios.

Findings

A model for predicting the delays in IMR service delivery, based on four practical variables that are readily available during the planning phase, was developed and tested. The factors contributing to delays in petroleum subsea IMR services based on importance are: water depth, weather, job complexity, job uncertainty as well as job complexity mix.

Research limitations/implications

The MVA model is developed based on analyzing subsea IMR service jobs performed in the petroleum industry from 2006-2008. The model can be used in the planning stage to predict potential delays in service delivery based on practical variables available.

Originality/value

The research proposes a MVA model for predicting delays in service delivery. The model is useful for predicting potential delays in service delivery and for improving the plan based on model analysis results.

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Article
Publication date: 29 April 2021

Ronit Yitshaki

The purpose of this study is to examine the role of emotional intelligence (EI) in explaining high-tech entrepreneurs' psychological ownership (PO) and, in turn, how their…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the role of emotional intelligence (EI) in explaining high-tech entrepreneurs' psychological ownership (PO) and, in turn, how their PO influences venture growth.

Design/methodology/approach

This study is based on data collected from 106 high-tech Israeli entrepreneurs.

Findings

The findings indicate that using emotions for problem-solving is positively associated with PO sense of efficacy, and that appraisal of emotions of others is negatively associated with PO sense of territoriality. Moreover, PO sense of efficacy is positively associated with growth, whereas sense of territoriality is negatively associated with growth. Finally, sense of territoriality has a curvilinear effect on venture growth.

Research limitations/implications

Understanding of the antecedents of entrepreneurs' PO and its influence on firms' growth is scant. The findings contribute to the psychology of entrepreneurship and PO literature by showing the influence of affective-based processes on high-tech start-up growth.

Practical implications

The findings of this study suggest the entrepreneurs' EI indirectly affects other affective behaviors such as PO, which in turn influence venture growth. It highlights the need of entrepreneur to regulate their emotions and manage the emotional- and cognitive-based processes for the sake of firms' growth.

Originality/value

The findings expand the knowledge pertaining to the psychology of entrepreneurship by showing how EI as an affective dimension is interrelated with affective-based process and entrepreneurial firms' growth.

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Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

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International Perspectives on Participation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-169-5

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1997

James L. Price

Addresses the standardization of the measurements and the labels for concepts commonly used in the study of work organizations. As a reference handbook and research tool…

Abstract

Addresses the standardization of the measurements and the labels for concepts commonly used in the study of work organizations. As a reference handbook and research tool, seeks to improve measurement in the study of work organizations and to facilitate the teaching of introductory courses in this subject. Focuses solely on work organizations, that is, social systems in which members work for money. Defines measurement and distinguishes four levels: nominal, ordinal, interval and ratio. Selects specific measures on the basis of quality, diversity, simplicity and availability and evaluates each measure for its validity and reliability. Employs a set of 38 concepts ‐ ranging from “absenteeism” to “turnover” as the handbook’s frame of reference. Concludes by reviewing organizational measurement over the past 30 years and recommending future measurement reseach.

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International Journal of Manpower, vol. 18 no. 4/5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

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Article
Publication date: 10 July 2007

Suzanne C. de Janasz and Scott J. Behson

The purpose of this study is to examine how individuals cognitively process work‐family conflict (WFC), specifically whether differences in tolerance for uncertainty and

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine how individuals cognitively process work‐family conflict (WFC), specifically whether differences in tolerance for uncertainty and cognitive complexity influence individuals' affective response to WFC.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a sample of 157 employees who completed a survey on work‐family issues, the hypotheses were tested using correlation and regression analyses.

Findings

The results suggest that cognitive differences may moderate the negative impacts of WFC. It was found that while WFC (i.e. work interference with family) lowers job satisfaction, this effect is less strong for those high in tolerance for uncertainty. The same was true for the ameliorating effect of cognitive complexity and tolerance for uncertainty on the link between WFC and (i.e. family interference with work) organizational commitment.

Research limitations/implications

Because of its cross‐sectional design, the causality of the findings cannot be confirmed. Further, while the sample contained both parents and non‐parents, and men and women, due to power concerns, our analyses did not account for these demographic differences. Future research should be designed to correct for these issues.

Practical implications

Organizations may need to rethink their programs and policies aimed at assisting employees in balancing work and family. Simple options (e.g. time off) may appeal to all employees; however others (e.g. job sharing and flextime) require complicated arrangements or behavior changes and may only appeal to or be utilized successfully by employees with high tolerance for uncertainty and cognitive complexity.

Originality/value

Within work‐family research, few studies look at how individual cognitive processes influence whether and how potentially conflictual situations are perceived and their impact on individual outcomes such as satisfaction and commitment. The research investigates two such cognitive differences and demonstrates the role that tolerance for uncertainty and cognitive complexity may play in reducing the negative impact of work‐family conflict.

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Career Development International, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1997

Robert W. Hetherington

This study examines the impact of bureaucratic structure on morale among hospital staff. Hypotheses are drawn from Hage's axiomatic theory of organizations, including the…

Abstract

This study examines the impact of bureaucratic structure on morale among hospital staff. Hypotheses are drawn from Hage's axiomatic theory of organizations, including the predicted negative impact on morale of formalization, centralization and stratification, and the positive impact on morale of task complexity. Contingency hypotheses involving structure and task complexity are also examined. Results indicate morale is either positively affected or unaffected by structure, and negatively affected by process. Some evidence of contingent effects are found. The findings are discussed within the broader context of Weber's theory of bureaucracy. This paper addresses the relationship between several structural features of bureaucracy and workers' morale in a hospital setting. It examines these relationships from broadly defined theoretical perspectives. In this connection, Weber's theory of bureaucracy is treated, as was the case in his original, as part of his general theory of rationalization in modern western society. The study considers the relationship between: 1) Formalization and morale, 2) Centralization and morale, 3) Stratification and morale, 4) Complexity and morale. These structural features of bureaucracy—formalization, centralization, stratification and complexity‐are treated as the means at the command of management for attaining organizational objectives. Worker morale is often referred to as the “level of feeling” about themselves among workers or about the work they perform (Revans, 1964; Veninga, 1982; Simendinger and Moore, 1985; Zucker, 1988). In effect, the term is used in stating that morale is high or low to suggest that something is right or wrong about the organization. Surprisingly, many of these studies do not explain why they are suggesting a particular state of morale, but only that the state of morale is crucial to the performance of the organization. In essence, morale is the level of confidence of the employees. It can vary from one department to the other due to specific or overall structural conditions of the organizations; without giving it routine consideration, performance will degenerate (Nelson, 1989).

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International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 17 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

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Article
Publication date: 4 July 2017

Nafisat Toyin Adewale, Yushiana Mansor, Muhammad-Bashir Owolabi Yusuf and Ahmeed Onikosi

This study investigates the moderating effects of age, experience and educational qualification on the relationship between uncertainty and subjective task complexity

Abstract

Purpose

This study investigates the moderating effects of age, experience and educational qualification on the relationship between uncertainty and subjective task complexity among lawyers working in private law firms in Lagos State, Nigeria.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey method was adopted and data were gathered using questionnaires. The analysis was carried out based on partial least squares structural equation modelling using SmartPLS 2.0 M3 software.

Findings

Results showed that the effect of uncertainty on subjective task complexity is significantly moderated by age, educational attainment, experience of the lawyers under study.

Research limitations/implications

Although data were collected in the most populated state and commercial hub of Nigeria, generalisation based on findings may still need to be made with caution.

Practical implications

Attainment of higher educational qualification is highly important for lawyers even though the minimum requirement to practice as a lawyer is a degree. Lawyers with higher degrees (LLM and PhD) had less uncertainty and perceived their tasks to be less complex compared to their counterparts who had the first degree (LLB).

Originality/value

The demographic profile of professionals (age, education and experience) has proven to have an impact on their perception about task complexity as determined by uncertainty as found in this study.

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Book part
Publication date: 8 April 2005

Ricardo Madureira

This paper illuminates the distinction between individual and organizational actors in business-to-business markets as well as the coexistence of formal and informal…

Abstract

This paper illuminates the distinction between individual and organizational actors in business-to-business markets as well as the coexistence of formal and informal mechanisms of coordination in multinational corporations. The main questions addressed include the following. (1) What factors influence the occurrence of personal contacts of foreign subsidiary managers in industrial multinational corporations? (2) How such personal contacts enable coordination in industrial markets and within multinational firms? The theoretical context of the paper is based on: (1) the interaction approach to industrial markets, (2) the network approach to industrial markets, and (3) the process approach to multinational management. The unit of analysis is the foreign subsidiary manager as the focal actor of a contact network. The paper is empirically focused on Portuguese sales subsidiaries of Finnish multinational corporations, which are managed by either a parent country national (Finnish), a host country national (Portuguese) or a third country national. The paper suggests eight scenarios of individual dependence and uncertainty, which are determined by individual, organizational, and/or market factors. Such scenarios are, in turn, thought to require personal contacts with specific functions. The paper suggests eight interpersonal roles of foreign subsidiary managers, by which the functions of their personal contacts enable inter-firm coordination in industrial markets. In addition, the paper suggests eight propositions on how the functions of their personal contacts enable centralization, formalization, socialization and horizontal communication in multinational corporations.

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Managing Product Innovation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-311-2

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Article
Publication date: 9 June 2021

Volkan Yeniaras and Ilker Kaya

Drawing on the theoretical lens of the job demands-resources model, this study builds upon and tests a conceptual model that links customer prioritization, product…

Abstract

Purpose

Drawing on the theoretical lens of the job demands-resources model, this study builds upon and tests a conceptual model that links customer prioritization, product complexity, business ties, job stress and customer service performance. Conceptualizing customer prioritization and product complexity as job demands and business ties as personal job resources, this research explicates the mediating process by which customer prioritization and product complexity affect customer service performance through job stress and its boundary conditions. The purpose of this paper is to offer a theoretical framework in which business ties moderates the mediated relations of customer prioritization and product complexity to customer service performance.

Design/methodology/approach

Structural equation modeling and a moderated mediation analysis were used on a unique multi-level, multi-respondent data set of 248 participants from 124 small and medium-sized enterprises in Turkey.

Findings

This study finds that both customer prioritization and product complexity increase job stress. In addition, this paper finds that business ties have a bitter-sweet nature as a personal resource and reverse the relation of customer prioritization to job stress while strengthening the negative direct relation of product complexity to job stress. Finally, this study finds that the indirect relation of customer prioritization to customer service performance through job stress is contingent on business ties. Specifically, this paper finds that high levels of business ties negate the indirect relation of customer prioritization to customer service performance while low levels of business ties exacerbate the negative effects of customer prioritization to customer service performance, channeled through job stress.

Practical implications

The findings demonstrate the critical role that personal networks play in reducing job stress and enhancing customer service performance for small and medium-sized enterprises that adopt customer-centric strategies such as customer prioritization. Nevertheless, the results suggest that the managers need to cognizant of the undesirable consequences of business ties may have on job stress when boundary-spanners handle a wide range of products/services that are technically complex. Accordingly, this study recommends small and medium-size enterprise managers and owners should be cautious in resource allocation to establish informal, personal ties with suppliers, competitors, customers and other market collaborators.

Originality/value

This paper offers a deeper perspective of the relations of customer prioritization and product complexity to job stress and customer service performance. This study also specifies business ties as a personal coping resource, which decreases the undesirable consequences when used in small and medium enterprises that adopt customer-centric strategies.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

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