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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1980

TONY FRASER and KERI PHILLIPS

The first article in this series outlined a range of options which the social skills trainer has when deciding how to design and run his training programmes. We also…

Abstract

The first article in this series outlined a range of options which the social skills trainer has when deciding how to design and run his training programmes. We also emphasised that there was no need for the trainer to attach himself too rigidly to one approach and that during a single training event he could give his course members the opportunity to learn through ‘thinking’, ‘doing’ and ‘feeling’. The second article concentrated on the crucial nature of feedback in social skills training, exploring different types of feedback and looking at the different ways in which it could be given. This third and final article describes the skills which the trainer needs to acquire and develop, and looks at the responsibilities he is likely to have. The points we make apply particularly to the types of courses which are based largely on a ‘feelings’ approach and which in broad terms are concerned to examine the nature of the relationships between the course members. However, we believe that the article will be of interest to anybody who has an interest in social skills training.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 12 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1982

Tad Leduchowicz

“Articles have been written, and will continue to be published, about the variety of methods and techniques available to the trainer and the new technologies which relate…

Abstract

“Articles have been written, and will continue to be published, about the variety of methods and techniques available to the trainer and the new technologies which relate to the job he must perform. Insufficient attention has been given to the trainer — the trainer as a person. We must devote more of our energies to the consideration of what we expect of this person we call a trainer if the development of manpower resources is to achieve the purposes which are essential in an industrial society.”

Details

Management Research News, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1998

Jenni Gilleard

Trainers are no longer mere providers of activities; their role is increasingly to add value to organizational learning as the foundation for future competitiveness…

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Abstract

Trainers are no longer mere providers of activities; their role is increasingly to add value to organizational learning as the foundation for future competitiveness. However some trainers may feel inadequately empowered to do so. This paper considers how the attitudes, feelings, and experiences of three trainers affected their role of change‐maker, within one particular training program. These issues were explored through a questionnaire completed at the end of the delivery cycle. The results suggest more account of trainers’ belief systems may be necessary if change management objectives are to be credibly and consistently achieved. As such employers, managers, and peers, as well as the individual all have a part to play in enabling trainer empowerment as a bedrock for organizational change‐making, but strategies must take account of the cultural environment within which the organization is located.

Details

Empowerment in Organizations, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4891

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 May 1986

Oladele Akin‐Ogundeji

Many articles have been written in recent years on trainers' roles. However, much of what has been written was often prescriptive. Besides, the suggestion has often been…

Abstract

Many articles have been written in recent years on trainers' roles. However, much of what has been written was often prescriptive. Besides, the suggestion has often been made that trainers need to operate as change agents within their organisations. Yet, only in very few instances had there been serious attempts to look closely into the prescription of a change agent role and the varying realities which confront trainers within their organisations. Even then such studies have been limited to the developed countries of Western Europe and America.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 18 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

Article
Publication date: 1 June 1985

Roger Bennett

Being effective is more than just having good ideas. You've got to be able to put those ideas into practice and, more important, those ideas must be relevant to the needs…

Abstract

Being effective is more than just having good ideas. You've got to be able to put those ideas into practice and, more important, those ideas must be relevant to the needs of the organisation. In this company, the previous approach to training was highly programmed. Courses were scheduled in a number of topic areas, nomination forms sent out, participants registered and trainers booked. It was so highly programmed you could tell which participant was doing what particular session on which course at any given moment. This was a successful approach but times have changed. We now need trainers to become more actively involved in helping and supporting line managers. In trying to put across this view, I came across some resistance, particularly from my immediate boss. I recognised that I had to start playing the politics game. I was able to set up an informal relationship with the chairman, who although not supporting my approach in writing, took every available opportunity to support it verbally. But this was not until I had demonstrated the relevance of my approach by talking in the language of the business, for example, costing out training activities and showing that they could be cost‐effective. My aim was actively to convince managers about the real value of training by demonstrating actual situations where training would have saved the organisation money. For example, I have collected statistics about the cost involved when company engineers lost time due to inadequate knowledge of new products when servicing equipment. It's taken me several years to convince people that the approach is relevant to the situation we are now facing, but I think I have got there.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 9 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

Article
Publication date: 1 September 1993

Richard Holden

Within a context of trainer training, examines a powerful exerciseto encourage trainers to reflect on their role and effectiveness withintheir organizations. Describes how…

Abstract

Within a context of trainer training, examines a powerful exercise to encourage trainers to reflect on their role and effectiveness within their organizations. Describes how participants are asked to draw a “picture” of the “ideal trainer”. Symbols, images and metaphors can be very illuminating in helping us deal with complexity and to communicate our thoughts and ideas. Illustrates three versions of the “ideal trainer” and explores how the images and symbols used can facilitate highly pertinent discussions on trainer development. Links can be more readily made to current models of trainer role and to the ongoing debate about “competences” and attention focused on how best to equip trainers to intervene effectively within their organizations. Using images and symbols to depict the ideal trainer, trainers and trainee trainers are better placed to see where they are and how they could develop.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 25 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 12 December 2015

Blanca Gordo

This study examines the implementation of a community-level Sustainable Broadband Adoption Program (SBA) under the Broadband Technology Opportunities Program (BTOP), a…

Abstract

Purpose

This study examines the implementation of a community-level Sustainable Broadband Adoption Program (SBA) under the Broadband Technology Opportunities Program (BTOP), a national public policy program meant to expand broadband deployment and adoption under the American Recovery Act of 2009, and administered by the National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA) at the U.S. Department of Commerce. The California Connects Program (CC) was administered by the Foundation for California Community Colleges (FCCC).

Methodology/approach

This chapter focuses on one part of CC’s efforts to expand broadband adoption among the most underserved Californians through collaboration with the Great Valley Center (GVC). CC-GVC provided basic computer and Internet classes to disconnected populations with low-literacy levels, and primarily in Spanish, through community-based organizations, public schools, public libraries, small businesses, and others in the Central Valley, an 18 county rural region with a high concentration of digital destitute populations. The program worked with under-resourced local community institutions with a range of poor technology resources and that operated under variable set of social, economic, political, and institutional conditions. Through inductive, process-oriented, and explanatory case study research, the structure, strategy, and training approach of CC was examined. Content and theme analysis of primary and secondary qualitative and quantitative data involving the program’s leadership, direct service providers, partners, participants, and nonparticipants was conducted. This involved a sample of 600 in-depth and short, structured and unstructured interviews and focus groups, archival and participant observation notes.

Findings

It was found that CC-GVC was able to meet uncertainty and operated with low institutional resources and paucity of linguistically appropriate teaching resources for new entrants through a flexible leadership approach that adapted to the social situation and was open to innovation. Community technology trainers were also able to engage those without or little direct experience with computers and with low-literacy levels with a linguistically appropriate and culturally sensitive step-by-step teaching approach that empowered and met people where they are. The author expands non-adoption models to include structural barriers in the analysis of the disconnected. It is argued that non-adoption is a result of evolving inequality processes fueled by poverty and under-resourced community development institutions and that teaching and learning is a social and institutional process that takes trust and time.

Practical Implications

CC shows that even the most disadvantaged can be empowered to learn-to-learn to use computers and can begin to function online and gain benefit under the most extreme institutional and economic conditions, but it takes more time and resources than providers expected and the Recovery Act provided.

Article
Publication date: 9 February 2022

Sangchul Park, Shinhyoung Lee and Hyun-Woo Lee

This study aims to examine how and when trainers' muscle mass impacts service purchase of personal fitness training, drawing upon signaling theory. Specifically, the…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine how and when trainers' muscle mass impacts service purchase of personal fitness training, drawing upon signaling theory. Specifically, the authors investigated (1) the mediating role of perceived competence in the relationship between trainers' muscle mass (highly vs moderately muscular) and customers' service registration intention and (2) the moderating role of customer expertise in this mediating mechanism.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conceptualized trainers' muscle mass, developed its experimental stimuli and validated them through the two pretests (total n = 387). Using the validated stimuli, the authors conducted the two experiments (total n = 802). In both experiments, the authors recruited participants via MTurk using the convenience sampling method and employed a single-factor between-subject design based on random assignment.

Findings

Findings supported the authors’ proporsed model. Consumers perceived highly (vs moderately) muscular trainers as more competent, which in turn engendered greater service registration intention. This effect emerged for expert consumers but not for novice consumers.

Originality/value

This study is one of the first attempts to empirically test the influence of trainers' muscle mass on consumer acquisition in the context of personal fitness training. It also expands the sport marketing literature to the consumer psychology and behavior fields addressing the characteristics of sport-service providers. The findings also provide fitness organizations with managerial insights into how to effectively leverage trainers' physical appearance as a marketing tool.

Details

International Journal of Sports Marketing and Sponsorship, vol. 23 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1464-6668

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 26 July 2021

Raphael Papa Kweku Andoh, Daniel Yeboah Mensah and Emmanuel Afreh Owusu

Training cannot be effective if trainers are not pedagogically competent. However, the influence of trainers’ pedagogical competencies on employees’ knowledge and skill…

Abstract

Purpose

Training cannot be effective if trainers are not pedagogically competent. However, the influence of trainers’ pedagogical competencies on employees’ knowledge and skill acquisition during training is not given the needed attention in the training literature. This study aims to examine the influence of trainers’ pedagogical competencies such as delivery, trainees’ involvement, use of visual aids and body language on trainees’ assimilation of training content.

Design/methodology/approach

The data are analyzed from 425 respondents in an online survey. This study uses structural equation modeling in testing the hypotheses following validity and reliability tests.

Findings

This study finds that trainers’ pedagogical competencies such as trainee involvement and body language have a significant influence on trainees’ assimilation of training content, but others such as the trainers’ delivery and use of visual aids do not have a significant influence on assimilation of training content.

Practical implications

Professionals responsible for training should endeavor to use trainers who have been proven to be pedagogically competent, especially involving trainees during training and use of body language and not just experts in the topics/areas they provide training. Trainers themselves should on their part do well to acquire pedagogical skills in addition to the content knowledge they possess to enhance their training effectiveness particularly, trainees’ assimilation of training content.

Originality/value

As a phenomenon rarely given attention, this study urges learning and development researchers and practitioners as well as human resource management professionals to give attention to the pedagogical competencies of trainers during training and trainees’ learning.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 34 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 May 2021

This paper aims to review the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoint practical implications from cutting-edge research and case studies.

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to review the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoint practical implications from cutting-edge research and case studies.

Design

This briefing is prepared by an independent writer who adds their own impartial comments and places the articles in context.

Findings

Soft-skills trainers and hard-skills trainers differed in the variety of instructional methods and in their emphasis on interpersonal relations and interactions, group management and communication. Those trainers with train-the-trainer certificates did not differ significantly from those who did not have them. Trainers with a university degree in educational science/psychology were more likely to teach soft skills than hard skills but did not agree more with the relevance of instructional skills and knowledge than those without such a degree.

Originality

The briefing saves busy executives, strategists and researchers hours of reading time by selecting only the very best, most pertinent information and presenting it in a condensed and easy-to-digest format.

Comment

The review is based on “Perceived instructional requirements of hard skills trainers and soft skills” by S. Wisshack and S. Hochholdinger, published in Development and Learning in Organizations: An International Journal.

Details

Development and Learning in Organizations: An International Journal, vol. 36 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7282

Keywords

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