Search results

1 – 10 of over 14000
Content available
Article
Publication date: 19 October 2017

John E. Berg

The diagnostic process after referral to an acute psychiatric treatment facility consists of more than the clinical investigation and laboratory tests. Psychometric tests

Abstract

The diagnostic process after referral to an acute psychiatric treatment facility consists of more than the clinical investigation and laboratory tests. Psychometric tests in a broad range of languages may be such an augmentation of our diagnostic armamentarium. Whether such tests are in use, and how they are distributed among different patient categories was the aim of the study. All referrals in one calendar year (N=1168), as they are depicted in the hospital computerized medical records, were investigated. Fifty-six (6.1%) out of 926 ethnic Norwegians and six (3.0%) out of 198 non-Western immigrants were tested, whereas none of the 44 Western immigrants. The difference between ethnic Norwegians and the immigrants was significant (Z=-3.05 and P=0.002). Psychometric tests were thus almost not in use, and even lesser so in immigrants. Mean number of resident days was higher among those tested, 11.7 (SD=11.2) versus those not tested, 7.4 (SD=10.4) days, t=2.97 and P=0.004. Length of stay for ethnic Norwegians did not differ from that for non-Western immigrants 11.4 versus 11.7, respectively. The patients tested were older than those not tested. Mean age was 43.0 (SD=14.4) versus 38.8 (SD=12.1), with a t=2.65 and P=0.03. The difference in resident days between all immigrants and ethnic Norwegians was significant with a Z=−2.232 and P=0.026. Level of testing was higher in ethnic Norwegians, and the tested patients stayed longer, maybe indicating more room for testing. Whether this low test-activity influences treatment quality is an unsettled question.

Details

Mental Illness, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2036-7465

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 14 September 2015

John Ehrich, Steven Howard, James Tognolini and Sahar Bokosmaty

The purpose of this paper is to address the issue of failing to psychometrically test questionnaire instruments when measuring university students’ attitudes towards…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to address the issue of failing to psychometrically test questionnaire instruments when measuring university students’ attitudes towards plagiarism. These issues are highlighted by a psychometric evaluation of a commonly used (but previously untested) plagiarism attitudinal scale.

Design/methodology/approach

The importance of psychometric testing is shown through an analysis of a commonly used scale using modern techniques (e.g. Rasch analysis) on 131 undergraduate education students at an Australian university.

Findings

Psychometric analysis revealed the scale to be unreliable in its present form. However, when reduced to an eight-item subscale it became marginally reliable.

Research limitations/implications

The main implication of this paper is that questionnaire instruments cannot be assumed to function as they are intended without thorough psychometric testing.

Practical implications

The paper offers valuable insight into the psychometric properties of a previously untested but commonly used plagiarism attitudinal scale.

Originality/value

The paper offers a straightforward and easy to understand introduction to researchers in higher education who use questionnaires/surveys in their research but lack an understanding of why psychometric testing is so critical. While similar papers have been written in other fields which advocate psychometric approaches, such as Rasch analysis, this has not been the case in higher educational research (or mainstream educational research for that matter).

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 3 October 2008

Angus S. McDonald

This paper aims to describe the impact of internet technology on psychometric testing and the issues this raises for best practice in test use.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to describe the impact of internet technology on psychometric testing and the issues this raises for best practice in test use.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach draws on best practice in the field of psychometrics and the author's experience in using the internet for test delivery.

Findings

The internet offers may significant advantages for the delivery and application and psychometric tests, but also poses a number of significant challenges to good test use, particularly in terms of the quality of test materials, effective administration and the authenticity of test results. These challenges, however, need not undermine the effectiveness of tests when they are used sensitively and with due regard for the issues raised by remote testing through the internet. Engaging respondents in the testing process is identified as key to all parties getting the maximum value from the applications of tests, as is a developmental mindset which identifies the value to both test users and respondents of participating in any testing process.

Practical implications

Users of internet‐based tests need to be aware of how to evaluate the quality of test materials and how to administer tests effectively. Although issues around respondent authenticity remain, these can be significantly overcome by helping test takers seen how they will benefit from test completion. Guidelines are given to test users on effective test administration.

Originality/value

This paper offers practical guidance on how to maximise the effectiveness of the increasing number tests that are available for internet delivery.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 40 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 3 April 2017

Henriette Lundgren, Brigitte Kroon and Rob F. Poell

The purpose of this paper is to explore how and why personality tests are used in workplace training. This research paper is guided by three research questions that…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore how and why personality tests are used in workplace training. This research paper is guided by three research questions that inquire about the role of external and internal stakeholders, the value of psychometric and practical considerations in test selection, and the purpose of personality test use in workplace training.

Design/methodology/approach

This research paper uses multiple-case study analysis. Interviews, test reports, product flyers and email correspondence were collected and analyzed from publishers, associations, psychologists and human resource development (HRD) practitioners in Germany, the UK and The Netherlands between 2012 and 2016.

Findings

Themes emerge around industry tensions among practitioners and professional associations, psychologists and non-psychologists. Ease of use is a more important factor than psychometrics in the decision-making process. Also, practitioners welcome publishers that offer free coaching support. In the process of using tests for development rather than assessment, re-labeling takes place when practitioners and publishers use positive terms for personality tests as tools for personal stocktaking and development.

Research limitations/implications

Despite extensive data collection and analysis efforts, this study is limited by its focus on a relatively small number of country cases and stakeholders per case.

Practical implications

By combining scientific evidence with practical application, stakeholders can take first steps toward more evidence-based HRD practice around personality testing in workplace training.

Originality/value

Little academic literature exists on the use of personality testing in workplace training. Without a clear understanding of the use of personality testing outside personnel selection, the current practice of personality tests for developmental purposes could raise ethical concerns about the rights and responsibilities of test takers.

Details

European Journal of Training and Development, vol. 41 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 12 February 2018

Natasha Katuta Mwila and Mabel Ironn Sky Turay

With the steady overall development of the continent, the African business landscape over the last decade has witnessed increased growth through numerous avenues. Growth…

Abstract

Purpose

With the steady overall development of the continent, the African business landscape over the last decade has witnessed increased growth through numerous avenues. Growth has been through the emergence of formalised small and medium enterprises, the growth of business and transition from one scale to another as well as inward foreign direct investment. The purpose of this paper is to investigate how this business growth can be sustained, particularly in the area of talent management, within the framework of the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper presents the findings of a narrative inquiry conducted in 2016 on an expert panel of talent managers in businesses based in South Africa.

Findings

The focus of the inquiry was the challenges in talent currently faced by South African businesses and what possible solutions, that address the question of sustainable development, may lie in talent management practices. The study finds that there may be scope for the augmentation of current practice in psychometric testing which may address a plethora of problems currently defining the talent context in African business.

Originality/value

The growth of African businesses has presented interesting challenges in managing the African business particularly in the area of human resources and talent management. A persistent notion is the question of sustaining this growth on the continent. As enterprise grows, the need for talent is ever more pressing. This paper seeks to present pathways to sustainability in this regards.

Details

World Journal of Entrepreneurship, Management and Sustainable Development, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-5961

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 5 September 2017

Khalid Mahmood

This paper aims to present the results of a systematic review of the evidence on psychometric properties of information literacy (IL) tests.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present the results of a systematic review of the evidence on psychometric properties of information literacy (IL) tests.

Design/methodology/approach

A two-stage search strategy was used to find relevant studies in two subject and three general databases. A descriptive review of test characteristics and psychometric properties was presented. The review included 29 studies describing psychometric properties of 18 IL tests.

Findings

It was found that the classical test theory was applied for all tests. However, the item response theory was also applied in three cases. Most of the psychometric tests were developed in the USA using ACRL IL competency standards. The most commonly used psychometric analyses include content validity, discriminant validity and internal consistency reliability.

Research limitations/implications

Only studies in English language are included in this review.

Practical implications

The study recommends that standards should be developed for the use and reporting of psychometric measures in designing IL tests. Librarians need to be trained in psychometric analysis of tests.

Originality/value

It is the first study that systematically reviewed psychometric properties of IL tests. The findings are useful for librarians who are teaching IL courses.

Details

Library Review, vol. 66 no. 6/7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 2 September 2014

John E.G. Bateson, Jochen Wirtz, Eugene Burke and Carly Vaughan

Service employees in subordinate service roles are crucial for operational efficiency and service quality. However, the stressful nature of these roles, inappropriate hire…

Abstract

Purpose

Service employees in subordinate service roles are crucial for operational efficiency and service quality. However, the stressful nature of these roles, inappropriate hire selection, and the proliferation of job boards have created massive recruitment problems for HR departments. The purpose of this paper is to highlights the growing costs of recruiting the right candidates for service roles while offering an alternative approach to recruitment that is more efficient and effective than the traditional approach.

Design/methodology/approach

The study offers empirical evidence of five instances in which the use of psychometric sifting procedures reduced recruitment costs, while improving the quality of the resultant hires.

Findings

By standing the traditional recruitment process “on its head” and using psychometric tests at the start of the selection process, the recruitment process can be significantly improved. Such tests efficiently weed out unsuitable candidates before they even enter the recruitment process, leaving a smaller, better-qualified pool for possible recruitment.

Practical implications

Firms can safely use the psychometric sifts to select applicants according to their operational efficiency, customer orientation, and overall performance. This paper illustrates the use of both traditional questionnaire measures and situational judgment tests to remove unsuitable applicants at the start of the selection process. A real-life case study suggests that such an approach increases the hiring success rate from 6:1 to 2:1. In the opening of a new supermarket by a UK group, this process saved 73,000 hours of managers’ time, representing $1.8 million savings in opening costs.

Originality/value

The paper offers a viable cost-saving alternative to a growing problem for HR departments in service firms and provides directions for further research.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 1993

Wendy Lord

Sets out the various categories of psychometric assessment toolsand explores how they might be used by the employment counsellor.

Abstract

Sets out the various categories of psychometric assessment tools and explores how they might be used by the employment counsellor.

Details

Employee Councelling Today, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-8217

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 3 September 2019

Nicholas Ryan Prince and Rüdiger Kabst

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the impact of national culture on organizations’ use of selection practices, specifically to investigate the impact of in-group…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the impact of national culture on organizations’ use of selection practices, specifically to investigate the impact of in-group collectivism, uncertainty avoidance and power distance on interview panels, one-on-one interviews, applications forms, references, ability, technical and psychometric tests.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses survey data from the 2008–2010 CRANET database. It uses OLS regression analysis to test the impact of national culture on organizations’ use of selection practices.

Findings

In-group collectivism increases the use of panel interviews and technical tests, and decreases the use of one-on-one interviews and application forms. Uncertainty avoidance increases the use of panel interviews and technical tests, and a decrease in one-on-one interviews, applications ability, and psychometric tests. Power distance leads to an increase in one-on-one interviews, applications and ability tests, and a decrease in panel interviews, psychometric tests and references.

Originality/value

This paper investigates the use of the impact of national culture on selection practices. Specifically, it looks at the use of a large number of selection practices panel interviews, one-on-one interviews, applications and references, and several different tests, ability, technical and psychometric.

Details

Employee Relations: The International Journal, vol. 41 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 21 September 2012

Alan Quirk, Sarah Smith, Sarah Hamilton, Donna Lamping, Paul Lelliott, Daniel Stahl, Vanessa Pinfold and Manoharan Andiappan

A psychometrically validated measure is needed to evaluate outcomes in carers of people with mental health problems, including dementia. This study aims to develop and…

Abstract

Purpose

A psychometrically validated measure is needed to evaluate outcomes in carers of people with mental health problems, including dementia. This study aims to develop and validate the Carer well‐being and support questionnaire (CWS).

Design/methodology/approach

Development and evaluation of the measure was conducted in three phases. The authors deconstructed an existing questionnaire (CUES‐C) to produce a long version measure. This was trialed with carers to reduce the number of items and a preliminary evaluation of the psychometric properties of the remaining items was undertaken. A second field test was conducted with the item‐reduced questionnaire measure to evaluate acceptability, reliability and validity.

Findings

The CWS well‐being scale shows moderate acceptability and good reliability and validity. The CWS support scale shows moderate acceptability and good reliability; validity testing for the support scale is limited by the lack of appropriate validating measures.

Practical implications

The CWS is a reliable, valid measure of carer well‐being and support, reflecting important aspects of carers' lives.

Originality/value

This paper provides researchers and practitioners with a tool that can be used to measure and address areas of support for carers. This is important in assessing the effectiveness of new interventions and approaches.

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 14000