Search results

1 – 10 of 41
Article
Publication date: 29 September 2023

Mark Scott, Jonothan Neelands, Haley Beer, Ila Bharatan, Tim Healey, Nick Henry, Si Chun Lam and Richard Tomlins

It is well known that culture is a catalyst for change, helping economies respond to societal problems and demands and that culture is where people turn to in moments of crisis…

Abstract

Purpose

It is well known that culture is a catalyst for change, helping economies respond to societal problems and demands and that culture is where people turn to in moments of crisis. In this case study around designing and implementing evaluation methodologies/frameworks for Coventry UK City of Culture 2021, it is suggested that in English public policy and within publicly invested arts there is a maturation of thinking around recognising/measuring the public value of culture including its social value. The purpose of this paper is to chart the recent policy of justifying cultural expenditure with social value claims and highlight challenges for evaluating activity within Coventry UK CoC 2021 as a change in wider policy is taking place.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper provides creative insights into the design and implementation of the evaluation methodologies/frameworks for Coventry UK City of Culture 2021. The authors of this paper as the collective team undertaking the evaluation of Coventry's year as UK City of Culture 2021 bring first-hand experiences of challenges faced and the need for a cultural mega-event to evidence its value.

Findings

The case study aims to address the concepts of measuring value within cultural events and argues that a paradigm shift is occurring in methods and concepts for evidencing the aforementioned value.

Research limitations/implications

The case study within this paper focuses on the build-up period to the UK City of Culture 2021 year and the thinking and logic behind the creation of the evaluation/measurement framework and therefore does not include findings from the actual cultural year.

Originality/value

It is acknowledged that there are papers examining measuring and evidencing the “value” of cultural mega-events, the authors bring real-life first-hand experience of the concepts being utilised by them on the ground in the delivery and evaluation design of Coventry, UK City of Culture 2021.

Details

Arts and the Market, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4945

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 3 August 2010

Tom Watson

808

Abstract

Details

Journal of Communication Management, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-254X

Book part
Publication date: 3 May 2023

Lisa Hansson, Claus Hedegaard Sørensen and Tom Rye

A general global wave of public participation is occurring. Students and researchers as well as civil servants, policy-makers, and NGO representatives are encouraged to study…

Abstract

A general global wave of public participation is occurring. Students and researchers as well as civil servants, policy-makers, and NGO representatives are encouraged to study, propose, and engage in public participation. New innovative forms of participation are suggested, and experiments in participation are ongoing locally and nationally. Within the transport sector, most studies of participation focus on road infrastructure and other land use changes. However, for other areas within transport, studies are limited and fragmented. Based on this, we see a need for a volume on public participation in transport, aimed at practitioners, students, and researchers, in what are unarguably times of change. The overall aim of the volume is to provide examples of different forms of public participation in transport, which can work as a setting for further analyses and discussions of public participation in transport. Drawing on different cases, eight empirical chapters are presented covering three main themes: grass-roots participation initiatives, participation in unconventional areas, and public participation that throws up unexpected results. In this introductory chapter, we set the scene for later discussions and analyses of public participation in transport. This chapter also provides an overview of the structure and content of the volume.

Details

Public Participation in Transport in Times of Change
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80455-037-3

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 October 2017

Kevin Healey and Niall Stephens

This paper aims to uncover the assumptions and concerns driving public debates about Google Glass and police body cameras. In doing so, it shows how debates about wearable cameras…

1160

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to uncover the assumptions and concerns driving public debates about Google Glass and police body cameras. In doing so, it shows how debates about wearable cameras reflect broader cultural tensions surrounding race and privilege.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper employs a form of critical discourse analysis to discover patterns in journalistic coverage of these two technologies.

Findings

Public response to Glass has been overwhelmingly negative, while response to body cameras has been positive. Analysis indicates that this contrasting response reflects a consistent public concern about the dynamics of power and privilege in the digital economy. While this concern is well-founded, news coverage indicates that technologists, policy makers and citizens each hold assumptions about the inevitability and unvarnished beneficence of technology.

Research limitations/implications

Since this qualitative approach seeks to discern broad emergent patterns, it does not employ a quantifiable and reproducible coding schema.

Practical implications

The article concludes by arguing that grassroots action, appropriate regulatory policy and revitalized systems of professional journalism are indispensable as the struggle for social justice unfolds in the emerging digital economy.

Social implications

These debates represent a struggle over what and how people see. Yet public discourse often glosses over the disadvantages of technological change, which impacts who is able to amass social power.

Originality/value

This comparative approach yields unique conceptual insight into debates about technologies that augment ways of seeing.

Details

Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-996X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 2008

Tim Freeman and Edward Peck

In this first of two articles, the authors assess the implications of policy developments in partnership and contestability, commissioning and procurement, and local jurisdiction…

Abstract

In this first of two articles, the authors assess the implications of policy developments in partnership and contestability, commissioning and procurement, and local jurisdiction for adult services joint ventures. They argue for creative responses to service delivery in which policy implementation is seen as an opportunity for local health and social care agencies to honour the history of, and future aspirations for, local partnerships. A second article will detail the very different responses to the policy agenda of four case study sites, exploring the local contours and aspirations underlying their decisions, with the intention of provoking discussion about the art of the possible in the broader community of interest.The papers draw on the authors' work funded by the Integrated Care Network (ICN) and Care Services Improvement (CSIP), which comprised a series of workshops to inform the further development of the plans of four local health and social care communities ‐ Portsmouth, Wolverhampton, Barnsley and Milton Keynes ‐ for commissioning and provision of adult care services, providing a community of interest in which aspirations, challenges and emerging solutions were exchanged and explored. Here we summarise transferable learning for the broader community of interest, drawn from the more detailed reports available from the ICN (Freeman & Peck, 2006, 2007).

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1991

Barbara A. Misztal

Emergencies commonly reveal the disorder from which routine order is painfully extracted. They dramatise social fissures, inconsistencies and ignorance that ordinarily remain…

189

Abstract

Emergencies commonly reveal the disorder from which routine order is painfully extracted. They dramatise social fissures, inconsistencies and ignorance that ordinarily remain hidden or can be ignored without damage or controversy. They transform the taken‐for‐granted into the up‐for‐discussion, compel the formation of decisions and accompanying justifications, and demand action of a special and urgent kind. Using Unger (1988) terminology, we can say that emergencies might reduce fixed distance between context and routines, thus they can be perceived as “context‐revising” situations, providing possibilities for lifting “a powerful constraint over all social practices, forcing them into a specific mould of predictable routines” (Unger 1988, p. 125). AIDS (an acronym formally designating the most developed stage of HIV infection but misleadingly used in our lexicon of public concern to stand for the disease as a whole), is such an emergency, not only due to the extent of the spread of the disease, but because this epidemic presents so many difficult ethical, legal and technical issues, and because of growing and changing knowledge about the disease, it requires continuous rethinking of strategies and adopting them to new discoveries.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

Article
Publication date: 2 May 2017

Alan Drury, Tim Heinrichs, Michael Elbert, Katherine Tahja, Matt DeLisi and Daniel Caropreso

Adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) are a broad conceptual framework in the social sciences that have only recently been studied within criminology. The purpose of this paper is…

2778

Abstract

Purpose

Adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) are a broad conceptual framework in the social sciences that have only recently been studied within criminology. The purpose of this paper is to utilize this framework by applying it to one of the most potentially dangerous forensic populations.

Design/methodology/approach

Archival data from 225 federal sex offenders was used to perform descriptive, correlational, and negative binomial regression models.

Findings

There was substantial evidence of ACEs including father abandonment/neglect (36 percent), physical abuse (nearly 28 percent), verbal/emotional abuse (more than 24 percent), and sexual abuse (approximately 27 percent). The mean age of sexual victimization was 7.6 years with the youngest age of victimization occurring at the age of 3. Offenders averaged nearly five paraphilias, the most common were pedophilia (57 percent), pornography addiction (43 percent), paraphilia not otherwise specified (35 percent), exhibitionism (26 percent), and voyeurism (21 percent). The offenders averaged 4.7 paraphilias and the range was substantial (0 to 19). Negative binomial regression models indicated that sexual sadism was positively and pornography addiction was negatively associated with serious criminal violence. Offenders with early age of arrest onset and more total arrest charges were more likely to perpetrate kidnaping, rape, and murder.

Originality/value

ACEs are common in the life history of federal sex offenders, but have differential associations with the most serious forms of crime.

Details

Journal of Criminal Psychology, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2009-3829

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 15 October 2020

Sarah Pedersen

Abstract

Details

The Politicization of Mumsnet
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-468-2

Book part
Publication date: 3 May 2023

Aline Fernandes Barata, Tim Jones and Sue Brownill

After a technocratic period predominating in mobility literature and practice, the rhetoric of participation has been incorporated as a vital condition for the sustainable…

Abstract

After a technocratic period predominating in mobility literature and practice, the rhetoric of participation has been incorporated as a vital condition for the sustainable mobility agenda and, more recently, for achieving transport and mobility justice. Considering the social significance of mobility beyond simple movement and participation as a term that can accommodate a wide range of motivations and implications, this chapter explores the complex interplay of participation and mobility in the global south context. To this end, this study adopts the spaces for participation framework to investigate the multiple roles of participation in urban mobility. With a focus on the Brazilian context, this chapter uncovers the nature, dynamics, and reach of invited and claimed spaces for participation in mobility planning. Using Rio de Janeiro as the case study site, the chapter examines the invited spaces for participation enabled by the city's mobility plan and analyses whether marginalised populations engage with and/or create further spaces for participation. This was achieved through document analysis, online photo-elicitation interviews with residents of Favela Santa Marta as well as semi-structured interviews with municipal government professionals and representatives of non-government organisations involved in the development of Rio's mobility plan. The chapter discusses the interconnectedness or lack of, within invited and claimed spaces for participation and the multiplicity of meanings attributed to participation and mobility by different actors. The chapter closes with a reflection on what this means for participatory mobility planning in Brazil but which may apply to similar regions in the global south.

Details

Public Participation in Transport in Times of Change
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80455-037-3

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 15 December 2015

David A. Waldman, Danni Wang, Maja Stikic, Chris Berka and Stephanie Korszen

In this chapter, we consider how neuroscience methods can enhance the study of team processes, as well as facilitate the development of teams. We overview exciting new…

Abstract

In this chapter, we consider how neuroscience methods can enhance the study of team processes, as well as facilitate the development of teams. We overview exciting new neuroscience technology that can be applied to the assessment of teams in real time. While research that has already used this technology to study team engagement and workload is summarized, we also consider other team-based concepts to which it might be applied, such as groupthink and shared mental models. We further suggest that emotional contagion and neurological mirroring concepts can come together to help us form a better understanding of emotions and their effects in teams. We conclude the chapter with a consideration of how neurological methods can potentially help develop team processes and provide insights for both members and team leaders.

Details

Organizational Neuroscience
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-430-0

Keywords

1 – 10 of 41