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Article
Publication date: 6 November 2017

Simon Burrow, Tim Bradshaw, Hilary Mairs, Helen Pusey and John Keady

The purpose of this paper is to describe the findings from an electronic questionnaire survey which set out to explore experiences of graduates of a part-time Master’s programme…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe the findings from an electronic questionnaire survey which set out to explore experiences of graduates of a part-time Master’s programme in dementia care at The University of Manchester.

Design/methodology/approach

An electronic questionnaire survey was sent to 57 graduates who had studied on the programme since it began in 2003. Thematic analysis was applied to qualitative data from responses to six open-ended questions.

Findings

In total, 31 completed questionnaires were received. Four key themes were identified from the qualitative data: juggling competing demands; experiencing personal growth and achievement; locating sources of support; and supporting changes to practice.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations included the small sample size and the survey not covering the experiences of students who had failed to complete the first year of study.

Originality/value

The study demonstrates the perceived value of dementia education at more advanced levels for people working in professional roles in dementia care, this included professional and personal development and supporting changes to practice. The study additionally adds to a limited evidence base relating to how mature, health and social care students experience part-time study in higher education and has implications for future research aimed at informing the development of appropriate course design and employer support.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 12 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 May 2023

Jerome Carson

This paper aims to provide a living tribute to the mental health activist and international trainer Peter Bullimore.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide a living tribute to the mental health activist and international trainer Peter Bullimore.

Design/methodology/approach

Peter provided a list of people to who he wanted to provide tributes. Jerome approached all these people. All agreed.

Findings

Several people from around the world attest to the influence that Peter’s teaching and personality have had on their clinical practice and on their lives.

Research limitations/implications

The disappearance of an Open Mind has left a shortage of journals, which welcome the user perspective. Mental Health and Social Inclusion have always championed the voice of people with lived experience. These are selected tributes to one man’s work in the field of mental health.

Practical implications

These accounts provide insights into the work of a remarkable individual.

Social implications

Students of the mental health professions are mainly exposed to work produced by their peers. The history of mental health is filled with the stories of professionals, not the people who have used services.

Originality/value

Historically accounts of psychiatry are written by mental health professionals. Service user or lived experience accounts are often written from the perspective of the person’s story of illness and recovery. There are comparatively few, which celebrate the additional achievements of specific individuals with lived experience.

Details

Mental Health and Social Inclusion, vol. 28 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-8308

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1998

Robin Stryker

Introduces a special issue on globalization and the welfare state. Asserts that economic globalization constrains national economic and social policy far more now than ever…

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Abstract

Introduces a special issue on globalization and the welfare state. Asserts that economic globalization constrains national economic and social policy far more now than ever before, although the level of international trade has not increased that much compared to levels at the beginning of this century. Talks about the political consequences of economic globalization, particularly welfare state retrenchment in the advanced capitalist world. Outlines the papers included in this issue – comparing welfare system changes in Sweden, the UK and the USA; urban bias in state policy‐making in Mexico; and the developing of the Israeli welfare state. Concludes that economic globalization has a limited effect in shaping social welfare policy in advanced capitalist countries; nevertheless, recommends further research into which aspects of economic globalization shape social welfare policy.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 18 no. 2/3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 June 2023

Mark Brosnan, Keith Duncan, Tim Hasso and Janice Hollindale

It has been two decades since the first academic paper shone a spotlight on non-GAAP earnings. The past 20 years of research investigates concerns over the misuse of these…

Abstract

Purpose

It has been two decades since the first academic paper shone a spotlight on non-GAAP earnings. The past 20 years of research investigates concerns over the misuse of these disclosures and resulted in some significant changes to accounting and reporting standards across the globe. This paper aims to document the history of non-GAAP reporting and outline the emerging themes of the now matured practice of non-GAAP reporting.

Design/methodology/approach

This systematic literature review searches two popular databases to identify the academic publications relating to non-GAAP reporting between 2002 and 2022. The paper uses bibliographic mapping to present the key statistics of the non-GAAP reporting field of research.

Findings

The non-GAAP reporting environment started out as the “wild West’ but, through regulation and public awareness, emerged as an important supplement to the traditional outputs of financial reporting. Current consensus is recent non-GAAP earnings are informative to users but there is lack of research into qualitative non-GAAP disclosures and the vast body of archival research needs triangulating with more experimental studies.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the literature by documenting the past 20 years of non-GAAP reporting and identifying the important existing and emerging research areas concerning non-GAAP earnings disclosures.

Details

Journal of Accounting Literature, vol. 46 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-4607

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 February 2012

Victoria Absalom‐Hornby, Patricia Gooding and Nicholas Tarrier

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the implementation of modern technology by using a web camera to facilitate a family intervention (e‐FI) in the treatment of…

348

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the implementation of modern technology by using a web camera to facilitate a family intervention (e‐FI) in the treatment of schizophrenia, within a forensic service.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study using questionnaire tools to measure outcome variables from the web‐based family intervention was used. Pre‐, mid‐ and post‐treatment scores were compared to present the progression of outcomes throughout the study.

Findings

This study provides an account of the successful implementation of a web camera facilitated family intervention in a forensic service. The findings showed improved social, emotional and practical outcomes for the family involved. The ease and acceptability of using the technique is demonstrated.

Originality/value

This study presents a novel application in utilising a web camera to implement family intervention within forensic services with successful outcomes.

Details

The British Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6646

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1998

Ana‐Maria Wahl

Investigates urban bias in state policy making in Mexico. Refers to literature claiming that rural poverty in developing nations is a major problem because capitalism reflects an…

Abstract

Investigates urban bias in state policy making in Mexico. Refers to literature claiming that rural poverty in developing nations is a major problem because capitalism reflects an urban bias. Examines social security coverage for the rural poor in Mexico and notes that there are great variations depending on area, suggesting that social security coverage is politically negotiable. Outlines briefly the historical development of Mexico’s welfare state and uses a power resource model to demonstrate how groups with competing interests go about securing benefits from the state. Cites literature on dependency theory, indicating that rural groups have failed to mobilize politically and have therefore not secured the same state resources (such as social security benefits and housing) as urban groups, yet argues that this does not always apply in Mexico, partially due to party politics and bureaucratic paternalism. Explains how data was collected to examine regional variations in social security coverage among the rural poor and how the data was analysed. Reveal that workers in important international export markets (such as cotton and sugar) have greater political leverage in obtaining better social security benefits. Notes also that areas supporting the political party in power obtain better benefits. Concludes, therefore, that rural workers are not powerless in the face of urban capitalism and that urban bias and dependency theories do not reflect the situation in Mexico – rather social security benefits are politically negotiable.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 18 no. 2/3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 18 January 2021

Gabrielle D. Young, David Philpott, Sharon C. Penney, Kimberly Maich and Emily Butler

This paper examines whether participation in quality early child education (ECE) lessens special education needs and insulates children against requiring costly, intensive…

Abstract

This paper examines whether participation in quality early child education (ECE) lessens special education needs and insulates children against requiring costly, intensive supports. Sixty years of longitudinal data coupled with new research in the United Kingdom and Canada were examined to demonstrate how quality ECE reduces special education needs and mitigates the intensity of later supports for children with special education needs. Research demonstrates that quality ECE strengthens children's language, literacy/numeracy, behavioural regulation, and enhances high-school completion. International longitudinal studies confirm that two years of quality ECE lowers special education placement by 40–60% for children with cognitive risk factors and 10–30% for social/behavioural risk factors. Explicit social-emotional learning outcomes also need to be embedded into ECE curricular frameworks, as maladaptive behaviours, once entrenched, are more difficult (and costly) to remediate. Children who do not have the benefit of attending quality ECE in the earliest years are more likely to encounter learning difficulties in school, in turn impacting the well-being and prosperity of their families and societies.

Book part
Publication date: 31 October 2012

Gwen C. Marchand and Kayana Sanders

Few studies in K-12 education have investigated the impact of changing schools during the academic year, or within-year transitions, on student motivation and achievement. Yet…

Abstract

Few studies in K-12 education have investigated the impact of changing schools during the academic year, or within-year transitions, on student motivation and achievement. Yet, many students face this type of transition, including children from low-income families living in urban areas, students from migrant worker and military families, and students with chronic behavioral problems. The evidence that does exist suggests that when students move between schools during the academic year, they may struggle with academic learning, behavior in school, and social interactions. This chapter approaches within-year academic transitions as a developmental context for student motivation. Drawing upon general systems theories and a specific theory of motivational development, the within-year transition is presented as an environmental demand that may lead to changes in student motivation and shifts in classroom actions, such as engagement. Continuity of subject learning and the formation of relationships are discussed as two challenges to student adjustment over the transition period. Student social and personal resources during the transition period are important factors in determining how a student adapts to a new school in the face of these challenges. Several methodological hurdles and possible approaches to conducting research in this area are discussed, as well as topics in need of additional research in this empirically overlooked area. The chapter concludes with suggestions drawn from the research literature as to how districts, schools, and classroom teachers can help support students transitioning between schools within the academic year.

Details

Transitions Across Schools and Cultures
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-292-9

Article
Publication date: 1 August 1989

David Smith, Tim Wolstencroft and Jayne Southern

The research reported here attempts to identify the personal skillswhich are important in the early years of graduate employment. Theresults are based on responses from over 250…

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Abstract

The research reported here attempts to identify the personal skills which are important in the early years of graduate employment. The results are based on responses from over 250 business and law graduates in the UK. When discussing the results a number of practical considerations for employers are highlighted. These include the importance of defining precise skill requirements and their relationship with attitudinal and knowledge‐based competences. The results suggest that some differences in skill requirements exist between employment sectors, and this may have implications for attempts to identify general managerial competences.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 13 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 July 2005

Tony Kang

Accounting accruals are at the heart of most accounting systems. A basic premise of accrual accounting is that it provides a more timely and relevant performance measure than cash…

Abstract

Accounting accruals are at the heart of most accounting systems. A basic premise of accrual accounting is that it provides a more timely and relevant performance measure than cash flows through a better matching of revenues and expenses. While some prior studies suggest that managers use individual accrual‐related disclosure items in an opportunistic manner, hindering market participants’ ability to predict future firm performance, the market’s expectation about future firm performance will become more accurate and consistent under accrual accounting if the market properly uses such information to set expectations about future firm performance. Consistent with this idea, our evidence shows that the frequency of accrual‐related disclosure is positively (negatively) associated with analysts’ forecast accuracy (dispersion). We interpret this finding as the presence of more detailed accrual‐related disclosure requirements enhancing the market participants’ ability to predict earnings.

Details

Accounting Research Journal, vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1030-9616

Keywords

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