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Book part
Publication date: 10 May 2017

Bernard P. Perlmutter

In this chapter, I examine stories that foster care youth tell to legislatures, courts, policymakers, and the public to influence policy decisions. The stories told by…

Abstract

In this chapter, I examine stories that foster care youth tell to legislatures, courts, policymakers, and the public to influence policy decisions. The stories told by these children are analogized to victim truth testimony, analyzed as a therapeutic, procedural, and developmental process, and examined as a catalyst for systemic accountability and change. Youth stories take different forms and appear in different media: testimony in legislatures, courts, research surveys or studies; opinion editorials and interviews in newspapers or blog posts; digital stories on YouTube; and artistic expression. Lawyers often serve as conduits for youth storytelling, translating their clients’ stories to the public. Organized advocacy by youth also informs and animates policy development. One recent example fosters youth organizing to promote “normalcy” in child welfare practices in Florida, and in related federal legislation.

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Studies in Law, Politics, and Society
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-344-9

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Book part
Publication date: 30 July 2012

Lisa Blackman

Purpose – To explore an ethics of entanglement in the context of mental health and psychosocial research.Design/methodology/approach – To bring together debates within…

Abstract

Purpose – To explore an ethics of entanglement in the context of mental health and psychosocial research.

Design/methodology/approach – To bring together debates within body and affect studies, and specifically the concepts of mediated perception and the performativity of experimentation. My specific focus will be on voice hearing and research that I have conducted with voice hearers, both within and to the margins of the Hearing Voices Network (see Blackman, 2001, 2007).

Findings – The antecedents for a performative approach to experimentation and an ethics of entanglement can be found within a nineteenth-century subliminal archive (Blackman, 2012).

Originality/value – These conceptual links allow the researcher to consider the technologies that might allow them to ‘listen to voices’ and introduce the non-human into our conceptions of listening and interpreting. This directs our attention to those agencies and actors who create the possibility of listening and learning beyond the boundaries of a humanist research subject.

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Ethics in Social Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-878-6

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Article
Publication date: 17 November 2011

Sue Holttum

This Research Watch seeks to summarise two recent research papers. The first examines the case for understanding hearing voices as part of normal experience, while the…

Abstract

Purpose

This Research Watch seeks to summarise two recent research papers. The first examines the case for understanding hearing voices as part of normal experience, while the second looks at befriending schemes.

Design/methodology/approach

A search was carried out for research papers with a mental health and social inclusion focus published within the previous 12 months.

Findings

Studies spanning more than 100 years suggest that hearing voices is more common than usually thought. There is a case for viewing this experience more positively than at present. Interviews involving eight people with mental health conditions and their befrienders suggested that demonstrating empathy and being non‐judgmental helped people with mental health conditions to talk things through with both parties learning from one another. Going out together helped befriendees gain greater confidence to participate in further activities and feel less isolated.

Originality/value

This paper summarises research relating to mental health and social inclusion that has emerged within the previous 12 months.

Details

Mental Health and Social Inclusion, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-8308

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Article
Publication date: 9 March 2015

Bianca Dos Santos and Vanessa Beavan

The distress that is associated with auditory hallucinations, or voices, is well documented. However, increasingly research into this phenomenon is also capturing those…

Abstract

Purpose

The distress that is associated with auditory hallucinations, or voices, is well documented. However, increasingly research into this phenomenon is also capturing those who cope with their voices, and live meaningful lives. Peer support is a popular and useful way in which to learn to manage the distress for voice-hearers. The Hearing Voices Network (HVN) acts as an umbrella organisation for which research, training and peer support groups exist (www.intervoiceonline.org). Despite the growing amount of peer support groups established, there is to date no published material on these groups. The purpose of this paper is to discuss these issue.

Design/methodology/approach

The present study used Interpretive Phenomenological Analysis to explore the experiences of four informants across three New South Wales HVN groups.

Findings

Results suggest that the social connections, value of sharing and desire for more group members are all important within the group. Beyond the group, informants described the increased willingness to talk to others about their voice experiences, improvements in sense of self and a positive change in their relationship with their voices.

Originality/value

The study demonstrates the importance of peer participation in the mental health workforce and the provision of safe spaces for those with lived experience to share and learn from each other in meaningful ways. Research implications include the need for further research measuring outcomes on a larger scale for these support groups.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

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Article
Publication date: 8 April 2014

Sue Patterson, Nicole Goulter and Tim Weaver

The purpose of this paper is to examine the experience and impact of targeted training involving simulation of auditory hallucinations on attitudes and practice of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the experience and impact of targeted training involving simulation of auditory hallucinations on attitudes and practice of professionals working with people with mental illness.

Design/methodology/approach

Pragmatic mixed-method study. Data were collected from 83 professionals who completed training using cross-sectional survey and focus groups. Descriptive, comparative and thematic analyses were performed.

Findings

Training was associated with changes in thinking and attitude related to working with people who hear voices. Participants, who commonly found the simulation confronting, drew on the experience to deepen appreciation of coping with voices that are distressing and develop a new frame of reference for practice. They positioned themselves differently and described adopting a range of practices consistent with the recovery approach. Environmental constraints variously impacted on capacity to enact these practices.

Research limitations/implications

The study was conducted in one centre using a bespoke survey instrument with a sample intrinsically motivated to complete training. Hence, caution should be exercised with regard to generalisability. However, findings are consistent with the limited published literature and the mixed-method approach provided a comprehensive understanding.

Practical implications

The paper demonstrated that the training employed can support development of patient centred, recovery-oriented practices. These are likely essential to optimising patient and service outcomes. Further research is needed to examine the impact of training on a broader cross section of professionals and the outcomes for patients.

Originality/value

The paper provides important new insights regarding the mechanisms by which training can contribute to development of patient-centred care.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

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Article
Publication date: 14 November 2016

Adrian William Coxell, Danielle Hett and Rachel Chapman

The purpose of this paper is to describe the lack of literature and research on command hallucinations (CHs) in D/deaf persons and make suggestions for assessment…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe the lack of literature and research on command hallucinations (CHs) in D/deaf persons and make suggestions for assessment, instrument development and research into CHs in D/deaf persons. This is important since it is known that hallucinations are more common in persons with hearing impairment and because CHs are known to be associated not only with distress, but also suicide and homicide.

Design/methodology/approach

Articles on hallucinations and CHs in D/deaf persons are discussed in the context of existing literature on CHs in hearing persons.

Findings

When compared with the literature on hearing persons it is clear that very little is known about the prevalence of CHs in D/deaf persons and that there is a significant lack of research into emotional and behavioural responses to CHs in D/deaf persons. There is no knowledge about the effectiveness of cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) for D/deaf persons who experience CHs. This is important since a CBT approach has been found to reduce risky compliance.

Practical implications

This paper makes recommendations for informed and evidence-based assessments of CHs in D/deaf persons; such assessments may have an important role in reducing risk and distress.

Originality/value

This is the first paper to review and consider CHs in D/deaf persons as a distinct clinical phenomenon. This paper makes recommendations for the assessment of D/deaf persons who experience CHs.

Details

Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 18 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-8794

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Article
Publication date: 17 June 2011

Jim Chapman and Mervyn Morris

Previous research into psychosocial interventions courses has identified a problem with the uptake of newly acquired skills into routine practice. This paper seeks to…

Abstract

Purpose

Previous research into psychosocial interventions courses has identified a problem with the uptake of newly acquired skills into routine practice. This paper seeks to analyse interviews of students who have undertaken a module equipping them with recovery orientated skills to work with voice hearers at one higher education institution, to establish if the same problems exist, if any new problems have emerged and if any strategies can be employed to overcome these barriers.

Design/methodology/approach

Semi‐structured interviews were used to interview 45 previous course participants in four focus groups about their experiences of implementing skills acquired from the module into routine practice. Thematic analysis of the data was undertaken by two people, independent of one another and aided by the use of NVivo 8 software.

Findings

Three main themes were identified: organisational issues; resistance and process issues. Management support can be a great enabling factor, as can effective clinical supervision. The readiness of the individual to change and their perceived confidence to implement new skills are important factors as is the readiness from service users and their families to accept new ways of working.

Originality/value

Mental health educators need to be aware that although participants on a course might “buy‐in” to a new approach whilst undertaking a period of training, it is easy to slip into old customs and practices. More robust and accessible supervision might help participants to “keep the faith” with their new skills and knowledge, and may also help people feel more confident in trying out new skills.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

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Abstract

Details

Leading with Presence: Fundamental Tools and Insights for Impactful, Engaging Leadership
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-599-3

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Article
Publication date: 10 August 2012

Francine Schlosser and Roxanne Zolin

It is ironic that in stressful economic times, when new ideas and positive behaviors could be most valuable, employees may not speak up, leading to reduced employee…

Abstract

Purpose

It is ironic that in stressful economic times, when new ideas and positive behaviors could be most valuable, employees may not speak up, leading to reduced employee participation, less organizational learning, less innovation and less receptiveness to change. The supervisor is the organization's first line of defense against a culture of silence and towards a culture of openness. The purpose of this paper is to ask what helps supervisors to hear prosocial voice and notice defensive silence.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conducted a cross‐sectional field study of 142 supervisors.

Findings

The results indicate that prosocial voice is increased by supervisor tension and trust in employees, while defensive silence is increased by supervisor tension but reduced by unionization of employees and trust in employees. This indicates that, as hypothesized by others, voice and silence are orthogonal and not opposites of the same construct.

Research limitations/implications

The data are measured at one point in time, and further longitudinal study would be helpful to further understand the phenomena.

Practical implications

This research highlights the potential for supervisors in stressful situations to selectively hear voice and silence from employees.

Social implications

This research also has implications for supervisors who work in a unionized environment. Although seemingly counter‐intuitive, there is a value to employee unionization in terms of either reducing the level of actual defensive silence, or at least reducing supervisors’ perceptions of defensive silence.

Originality/value

The paper adds to our knowledge of prosocial voice and defensive silence by testing supervisors’ perceptions of these constructs during difficult times. It provides valuable empirical insights to a literature dominated by conceptual non‐empirical papers. Limited research on silence might reflect how difficult it is to study such an ambiguous and passive construct as silence (often simply viewed as a lack of speech). The paper contributes also to trust literature by identifying its role in increasing supervisor's perceptions of prosocial voice and reducing perceptions of defensive silence.

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Article
Publication date: 12 July 2018

Jaimee Felice Caringal-Go and Nico A. Canoy

The purpose of this paper is to explore the personal and contextual factors that shape the work experiences of Filipino social enterprise employees by listening to voices

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the personal and contextual factors that shape the work experiences of Filipino social enterprise employees by listening to voices within their narratives.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 11 social enterprise employees were interviewed about their work experiences. Using the Listening Guide as a method of analysis, common themes and the multiple voices within the narratives were identified.

Findings

Upon analysis, four stories were identified: stories of serving others, stories of providing for family, stories of managing relationships and stories of personal learning. Results show that the experiences and multiple identities of employees evoke the duality and hybridity that characterizes social enterprise organizations. The importance of relationships in collectivist cultures, and the salience of the indigenous concept of kapwa are also discussed.

Research limitations/implications

The use of narratives, and particularly, of voices within narratives as a critical tool to study work experiences is highlighted. Generalizability of results may be limited by contextual factors, such as organization type and country culture.

Originality/value

In this study, the narratives of social enterprise workers from different positions were explored. The voices within their narratives were analyzed and used as a means to understand how they viewed the self, others, and their work in social enterprises embedded in collectivist and developing country contexts.

Details

Qualitative Research in Organizations and Management: An International Journal, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5648

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