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Article

Thomas N. Garavan, Ronan Carbery and Andrew Rock

The purpose of this paper is to explore the concept of talent development, define its scope and identify the issues involved in formulating talent development strategies…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the concept of talent development, define its scope and identify the issues involved in formulating talent development strategies in organisations.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper reviews the relatively scant and fragmented literature on talent development processes.

Findings

The literature review revealed that talent development is usually discussed as part of a wider talent management process. The literature highlights issues concerning who is the talent to be developed, what competencies should be developed, who drives development, what is the appropriate pace of development and what is the architecture to support the development.

Research limitations/implications

The paper is solely theoretical in nature; however, it does identify gaps for further research.

Practice implications

The paper raises a number of important questions that should be considered by organisations when they engage in talent development.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to a perceived gap in the literature and highlights the issues that come within the terrain of talent development.

Details

European Journal of Training and Development, vol. 36 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

Keywords

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Article

Evert Pruis

In this socio‐economic climate there may still be budget for talent development, but it might not be as much as we have grown accustomed to. There is a growing need for

Abstract

Purpose

In this socio‐economic climate there may still be budget for talent development, but it might not be as much as we have grown accustomed to. There is a growing need for effective, sustainable and prudent programs: the question is “how?” This paper aims to address this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

Through the author's work with clients in industry, services and government, five key talent development principles are distilled, tested and evaluated.

Findings

There are various, sometimes conflicting, ways to determine who is of value within an organisation. HR departments are unlikely to address talent management as an integrated process. The form and purpose of talent development efforts are frequently mismatched. Preferred learning styles and the design of talent programs are often at odds. Talents have the potential to be much more engaged in and meaningful to their organisation.

Practical implications

Clarify what “talent” means in your organisation by formulating a crystal clear policy. Perceive talent management as an integrated process and start organising it as a coherent effort, involving all human resource departments. Fulfil a clear and present organisational need with your talent development efforts. Offer mentoring by true role models and thus enhance the talent's organisational “know‐how” and business insight and accelerate their development. Harness the power of the talent pool, because talents working in teams could offer your company a huge and largely untapped cognitive surplus.

Originality/value

The five key principles of talent development and the 25 decisions will aid human resource professionals in assessing or designing their own talent, leadership and career development trajectories.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 43 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

Keywords

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Article

Natalie Govaerts, Eva Kyndt, Filip Dochy and Herman Baert

The aim of this study is to investigate some factors that have an influence on employee retention. Based on the literature and previous research, both employee and…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this study is to investigate some factors that have an influence on employee retention. Based on the literature and previous research, both employee and organisational factors are taken into account.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected by means of a questionnaire that was distributed on a voluntary basis in professional organisations and among employees, both electronically and in hard‐copy, during 2008‐2009. The study sample consisted of 972 employees, mainly clerks, from diverse profit and social‐profit organisations.

Findings

The results show that when organisations want to retain their employees it is important to pay attention to the learning of employees. Letting people do more and learn more of what they are good at will encourage them to stay with the organisation. Results concerning the selected employee variables show that only age has a significant relationship with retention. Regarding the intention to stay, there exists a positive relationship between age and retention.

Research limitations/implications

A limitation of this study is that both employee as organizational factors are measured through the perceptions of employees. The response set of subjects when responding to self‐report measures could therefore be the result of a temporary mood, or could be the result of what may be considered as socially appropriate by the participants. Another limitation is that the questionnaire was voluntarily completed by the respondents; the researcher had therefore no information about the non‐respondents.

Originality/value

The paper focuses on the factors influencing employee retention.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 23 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

Keywords

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Article

Arunprasad Purushothaman

– The purpose of this paper is to identify and measure the organizational learning outcomes in a sample of knowledge-intensive firms like software companies.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify and measure the organizational learning outcomes in a sample of knowledge-intensive firms like software companies.

Design/methodology/approach

The sample chosen for this study comprised software professionals; the software companies were chosen based on the listing in the National Association of Software and Services Companies annual report with financial turnover as a base for classification. The learning outcomes discussed in this study are grounded on the dimensions of the building blocks of learning organization, which are classified as learning dynamics, organization transformation, knowledge management, people empowerment and technology application.

Findings

Statistical analysis revealed significant differences in learning outcomes based on the organization’s age. The organizational learning orientation for medium- and very large-scale companies are on the higher side with reduced organization hierarchy; better technology-based learning; structured knowledge management practices; learning-centric talent acquisition, talent management and total rewards. Small-scale companies fared well in organization transformation dimension and large-scale companies constantly nurture the congenial learning environment.

Practical implications

The tool can help knowledge-intensive firms to analyze the extent to which organizational practices aligned with learning initiatives are visibly seen in terms of learning outcomes. Thus, the learning culture can be articulated and associated with the growing needs of an organization.

Originality/value

Organizational learning initiatives can be enhanced and reinforced through customized organization practices by observing the measures of learning dimensions.

Details

Development and Learning in Organizations: An International Journal, vol. 29 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7282

Keywords

Content available

Abstract

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 43 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

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Article

Atheer Abdullah Mohammed, Abdul Hafeez Baig and Raj Gururajan

The key objective of the study is to understand the best processes that are currently used in managing talent in Australian higher education (AHE) and design a…

Abstract

Purpose

The key objective of the study is to understand the best processes that are currently used in managing talent in Australian higher education (AHE) and design a quantitative measurement of talent management processes (TMPs) for the higher education (HE) sector.

Design/methodology/approach

The three qualitative multi-method studies that are commonly used in empirical studies, namely, brainstorming, focus group discussions and semi-structured individual interviews were considered. Twenty-three individuals from six Australian universities participated in this study.

Findings

The qualitative study explored three key themes and ten subthemes of TMPs that are used in AHE. These were: (1) talent attraction, (2) talent development and (3) talent retention.

Research limitations/implications

This study only targeted one country (Australia) and one sector (HE).

Practical implications

This study offers three major contributions as follows: theoretical, practical and policy aspects. Theoretically, the study provides a value-add to Talent Management (TM) theory through designing a guide (conceptual model) of TMPs for the HE sector. Practically, it collects original qualitative data regarding TM in the HE domain. From a policy point of view, this study adds more debate around adding new ideas to Australian education strategic plans for HE.

Originality/value

This study has a unique methodology because of strengthening the effect of an in-depth case study. For instance, two different techniques were used for data analysis for the same research objective as follows: (1) both manual methods and content analysis software (NVivo 11) and (2) the three-stage approach. Using these techniques for the same purpose in one study can provide greater flexibility to examine the relationship between theory and data.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. 12 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

Keywords

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Article

Renu Dalal and Mesut Akdere

There is a critical need to understand current talent development (TD) practices as well as developing a contemporary paradigm that will support a radically different…

Abstract

Purpose

There is a critical need to understand current talent development (TD) practices as well as developing a contemporary paradigm that will support a radically different future for TD. The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of the existing literature on TD, explore the fundamental role of TD in organizations and identify gaps for future directions.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper reviews the literature on TD.

Findings

Following themes are identified in selected TD articles: varied TD definitions, theoretical perspective for investigating TD, TD practices and effects and implications on training and development. The literature review identifies two levels of TD practices: organizational level and individual level.

Practical implications

The field of TD is rapidly changing because of the accelerating integration of technology and information into daily work environment. There is a critical need to understand current TD practices as well as to develop a contemporary paradigm that will support a radically different future for TD. Scope and boundaries of TD need to be set, so that practitioners can apply the right practice at the right time.

Originality/value

The paper presents the conceptual boundaries of TD in the current existing literature and identifies the gaps.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 50 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

Keywords

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Article

Brent Davies and Barbara J. Davies

Academies are semi‐autonomous schools set up outside the normal local government structures with sponsors from business and charity groups to create new and innovative…

Abstract

Purpose

Academies are semi‐autonomous schools set up outside the normal local government structures with sponsors from business and charity groups to create new and innovative ways of creating and sustaining school transformation. The aim of this paper is to assist in a strategic conversation within the academy movement on talent development.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper looks at talent identification, talent development and establishing a talent culture. It provides points in the text for readers to reflect on their own talent practice and provides case examples from current academies.

Findings

The paper shows that the longer‐term sustainability of the academy movement needs to address the key issue of developing leadership talent.

Originality/value

The paper provides an original and useful framework for developing talent management in academies.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 24 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

Keywords

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Article

Alex Anlesinya and Kwesi Amponsah-Tawiah

This study aims to critically examine talent management practices and strategies from ethical and responsible management perspectives.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to critically examine talent management practices and strategies from ethical and responsible management perspectives.

Design/methodology/approach

It achieves its aim through conceptual analysis by theorising through the lenses of talent philosophies, the organisational justice theory, the stakeholder theory and extant literature.

Findings

A responsible talent management construct and mode to guide the practice of talent management in a socially responsible way is developed. It argues that inclusivity; corporate responsibility; and equity and equal employment opportunity are the key underlying principles of a responsible talent management system. This study further argues that responsible talent management practices promote achievement of multilevel sustainable outcomes such as decent work, employee well-being and organisational well-being.

Practical implications

Emphasising responsible management and ethical concerns in organisational talent strategies and practices is non-negotiable, given the current level of interest in sustainable work and employment and in the quest to achieve sustainable human and organisational outcomes through management and organisational practices.

Originality/value

The development of a responsible talent management construct and model is original and novel and is expected to shape thinking and drive new research directions in the field of talent management. It further contributes directly to knowledge and practice by demonstrating how organisations can manage their talents in a responsible way.

Details

European Journal of Training and Development, vol. 44 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

Keywords

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Article

Interview by William Strange

The purpose of this article is to provide an interview with Andrew Kilshaw.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to provide an interview with Andrew Kilshaw.

Design/methodology/approach

The interview is conducted by an independent interviewer.

Findings

Andrew Kilshaw is Chief Learning Officer at Nike Inc., responsible for overseeing the development needs of over 37,000 employees in Nike's global work‐force. His varied background led from studies at Manchester University and Coventry Business School, to IMD, Lausanne, where Andrew received an MBA with distinction. Andrew has since worked with numerous top‐tier global companies, and specializes in leadership development and talent management.

Originality/value

The paper provides insights from Andrew Kilshaw about his role at Nike Inc., the learning and development profession, and strategies to develop and retain talent.

Details

Development and Learning in Organizations: An International Journal, vol. 26 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7282

Keywords

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