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Article
Publication date: 9 June 2020

The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between organizational justice and organizational citizenship behavior (OCB) and the mediating effect of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between organizational justice and organizational citizenship behavior (OCB) and the mediating effect of organizational commitment with power distance as a moderator.

Design/methodology/approach

Data was gathered from responses to a structured questionnaire by 379 employees based in ten banks from five metropolitan cities in Pakistan

Findings

The study finds no positive relationship between organizational justice and OCB, a positive relationship between organizational justice and organizational commitment, that organizational commitment mediates the relationship between organizational justice and OCB and that power distance moderates the relationship between organizational justice and organizational commitment.

Practical implications

Managers and policy makers should ensure fair and transparent processes within an organization to increase the confidence an employee has in the organizational systems and processes.

Originality/value

This paper has an original approach as it examines the moderating impact of power distance between organizational justice and organizational commitment in the context of a developing country, Pakistan.

Details

Human Resource Management International Digest , vol. 28 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-0734

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Article
Publication date: 29 May 2009

Ling Zhang, Ting Nie and Yongtai Luo

With the development of China's economy, more and more Chinese researchers in HR field try to explore suitable policies and practices from China's realities. Researchers…

Abstract

Purpose

With the development of China's economy, more and more Chinese researchers in HR field try to explore suitable policies and practices from China's realities. Researchers have spent considerable efforts to identify means of using human resource management practices to effectively utilize human capital. At the same time, it has been well recognized that organizational justice plays a critical role in effective management of employees' attitude and behaviors. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate a framework for matching organizational justice and employment mode.

Design/methodology/approach

Quantitative research method is used in this study. Base on literature review of organizational justice, HR architecture social exchange and so on. The study tries to find out the relations between organizational justice and employment mode.

Findings

The study integrates these two seemingly disparate streams of research, and put forwards a framework for matching organizational justice and employment mode. Different groups of employees are managed differently and may require different organizational justice styles, and organizational justice styles should be consistent with the underlying objectives and psychological contracts underlying different employment modes.

Originality/value

The study tries to make organizational justice strategies match with employment modes and it is an attempt to use organizational justice to manage different employee groups from contingent and deploying perspective.

Details

Journal of Technology Management in China, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-8779

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2005

David De Cremer

The purpose of the research was to test whether the widely known interaction between procedural and distributive justice influences cooperation, but only when employees 

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the research was to test whether the widely known interaction between procedural and distributive justice influences cooperation, but only when employees’ identification with the organization is strong.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey study was conducted in a company, including scales assessing distributive justice, procedural justice, employees’ sense of organizational identification and willingness to cooperate.

Findings

The results showed that this interaction effect was only found among those with a strong sense of organizational identification. However, the pattern of this interaction was different from the pattern found in previous studies, that is, both high procedural and distributive justice was required to best predict cooperation.

Originality/value

These findings identify yet another important moderator of the interaction between distributive justice and procedural justice, but also show that because of the cognitive content of the measure of organizational identification, the shape of the interaction is different than the one predicted by prior research.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Article
Publication date: 16 September 2021

Leslie H. Blix, Marc Ortegren, Kate Sorensen and Brandon Vagner

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effect of auditor alternative work arrangement (AWA) participants’ and non-participants’ perceptions of procedural and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effect of auditor alternative work arrangement (AWA) participants’ and non-participants’ perceptions of procedural and distributive justice on organizational commitment.

Design/methodology/approach

Using survey data from 110 auditors in the USA, this study uses a regression model to explore how AWA participants’ and non-participants’ perceptions of procedural and distributive justice affect organizational commitment.

Findings

As predicted, results show both participants’ and non-participants’ perceptions of procedural justice significantly affect organizational commitment. However, neither groups’ perceptions of distributive justice significantly affect their organizational commitment.

Originality/value

Organizational justice literature has shown that procedural and distributive justice influence organizational commitment. However, no study has controlled for AWA participation. The authors extend research by investigating the effects of procedural and distributive justice perceptions on organizational commitment for both participants and non-participants. The authors also extend accounting research that has narrowly examined AWA benefits and drawbacks, support, viability and perceptions of subordinate career success. Furthermore, there is limited AWA auditing research and this study offers a view prior to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Details

Managerial Auditing Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-6902

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Book part
Publication date: 10 June 2015

Russell Cropanzano, Marion Fortin and Jessica F. Kirk

Justice rules are standards that serve as criteria for formulating fairness judgments. Though justice rules play a role in the organizational justice literature, they have…

Abstract

Justice rules are standards that serve as criteria for formulating fairness judgments. Though justice rules play a role in the organizational justice literature, they have seldom been the subject of analysis in their own right. To address this limitation, we first consider three meta-theoretical dualities that are highlighted by justice rules – the distinction between justice versus fairness, indirect versus direct measurement, and normative versus descriptive paradigms. Second, we review existing justice rules and organize them into four types of justice: distributive (e.g., equity, equality), procedural (e.g., voice, consistent treatment), interpersonal (e.g., politeness, respectfulness), and informational (e.g., candor, timeliness). We also emphasize emergent rules that have not received sufficient research attention. Third, we consider various computation models purporting to explain how justice rules are assessed and aggregated to form fairness judgments. Fourth and last, we conclude by reviewing research that enriches our understanding of justice rules by showing how they are cognitively processed. We observe that there are a number of influences on fairness judgments, and situations exist in which individuals do not systematically consider justice rules.

Details

Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-016-6

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Book part
Publication date: 15 December 2015

Sebastiano Massaro and William J. Becker

This chapter advocates the use of neuroscience theoretical insights and methodological tools to advance existing organizational justice theory, research, and practice. To…

Abstract

This chapter advocates the use of neuroscience theoretical insights and methodological tools to advance existing organizational justice theory, research, and practice. To illustrate the value of neuroscience, two general topics are reviewed. In regard to individual justice, neuroscience makes it clear that organizational justice theory and research needs to integrate both emotion and cognition. Neuroscience also suggests promising avenues for practical individual justice interventions. For other-focused justice, neuroscience clarifies how empathy provides a mechanism for deontic justice while again highlighting the need to consider both emotion and cognition. Neuroscience research into group characterizations also suggests promising explanations for deontic justice failures. We also show how other-focused justice interventions are possible, but more complex, than for self-focused justice. We conclude that interdisciplinary research has great potential to advance both organizational justice and neuroscience research.

Details

Organizational Neuroscience
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-430-0

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Book part
Publication date: 18 September 2006

Bradley J. Alge, Jerald Greenberg and Chad T. Brinsfield

We present a model of organizational monitoring that integrates organizational justice and information privacy. Specifically, we adopt the position that the formation of…

Abstract

We present a model of organizational monitoring that integrates organizational justice and information privacy. Specifically, we adopt the position that the formation of invasiveness and unfairness attitudes is a goal-driven process. We employ cybernetic control theory and identity theory to describe how monitoring systems affect one's ability to maintain a positive self-concept. Monitoring provides a particularly powerful cue that directs attention to self-awareness. People draw on fairness and privacy relevant cues inherent in monitoring systems and embedded in monitoring environments (e.g., justice climate) to evaluate their identities. Discrepancies between actual and desired personal and social identities create distress, motivating employees to engage in behavioral self-regulation to counteract potentially threatening monitoring systems. Organizational threats to personal identity goals lead to increased invasiveness attitudes and a commitment to protect and enhance the self. Threats to social identity lead to increased unfairness attitudes and lowered commitment to one's organization. Implications for theory and research on monitoring, justice, and privacy are discussed along with practical implications.

Details

Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-426-3

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Book part
Publication date: 1 March 2012

Kursad Yılmaz and Yahya Altınkurt

This chapter examined the relationships between organizational justice, organizational trust, and organizational citizenship behaviors in Turkish secondary schools…

Abstract

This chapter examined the relationships between organizational justice, organizational trust, and organizational citizenship behaviors in Turkish secondary schools. Specifically, the study investigated whether, and to what extent, organizational justice and organizational trust predict variation in the organizational citizenship behaviors of teachers. A survey research methodology was employed in the study. The sample included 466 secondary school teachers in Kutahya, a city in western Turkey. The study adopted pre-developed respective scales for gathering the data. The data gathering instrument of the study incorporated the Organizational Justice Scale (Hoy & Tarter, 2004), the Organizational Trust Scale (Yılmaz, 2006), and the Organizational Citizenship Behavior Scale (DiPaola, Tarter, & Hoy, 2005). Analysis of the data through the use of hierarchical multiple regression analysis yielded a significant effect of organizational justice and significant effects for two of the three types of organizational trust. There is a positive and moderate level relationship between organizational citizenship on the one hand, and organizational justice, trust in the principal, trust in colleagues, and trust in stakeholders on the other. Predictor variables are ranked in terms of the size of their effect on organizational citizenship as trust in colleagues, trust in the principal, trust in stakeholders, and organizational justice. Organizational justice is a significant predictor of organizational citizenship behavior when considered in isolation, but becomes insignificant when organizational trust is controlled for. Organizational trust and organizational justice explain around two fifths of the total variance in organizational citizenship behavior.

Details

Discretionary Behavior and Performance in Educational Organizations: The Missing Link in Educational Leadership and Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-643-0

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Article
Publication date: 8 March 2021

Hanan AlMazrouei and Robert Zacca

The purpose of this paper is to study the influence of organizational justice and decision latitude on expatriate organization commitment and job performance.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study the influence of organizational justice and decision latitude on expatriate organization commitment and job performance.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 175 nonmanagerial-level expatriate employees in Dubai, UAE using a purposive sampling approach. A structural equation model with partial least squared analysis was utilized to test the hypotheses.

Findings

The results show that decision latitude partially mediates the relationship between organization justice and organizational commitment and fully mediates the relationship between organization justice and job performance.

Research limitations/implications

Data were collected from a cross sectional sample in UAE, and hence, the generalizability of the results to other contexts may be limited.

Practical implications

The research study suggests ways in which human resource managers and practitioners can develop a stronger awareness of the importance of decision latitude in employee decision-making and the role it plays in promoting employees' commitment and job performance given perceived organizational justice.

Originality/value

The present research is among the first of its kind to examine the study variables within the nonmanagerial expatriate context.

Details

Evidence-based HRM: a Global Forum for Empirical Scholarship, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-3983

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Article
Publication date: 15 December 2020

Dirk De Clercq, Inam Ul Haq and Muhammad Umer Azeem

This study investigates the mediating role of improvisation behavior in the relationship between employees' perceptions of procedural justice and their job performance, as…

Abstract

Purpose

This study investigates the mediating role of improvisation behavior in the relationship between employees' perceptions of procedural justice and their job performance, as evaluated by their supervisors, as well as the invigorating role of their organization-based self-esteem in this process.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey data were collected in three rounds among employees and their supervisors in Pakistan.

Findings

An important factor that connects procedural justice with enhanced job performance is whether employees react quickly to unexpected problems while carrying out their jobs. This mediating role of improvisation is particularly salient to the extent that employees consider themselves valuable organizational members.

Practical implications

For organizations, this study pinpoints a key mechanism—willingness to respond in the moment to unanticipated organizational failures—by which fair decision-making processes can steer employees toward performance-enhancing activities. It also reveals how this mechanism can be activated, namely, by ensuring that employees feel appreciated.

Originality/value

Improvisation represents an understudied but critical behavioral factor that links employees' beliefs about fair decision-making procedures to enhanced performance outcomes. This study shows, for the first time, how this beneficial role can be reinforced by organization-based self-esteem, as a critical personal resource.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 59 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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