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Article
Publication date: 19 October 2022

Taejun Cho, Yongho Park and Jaeyeon Jang

The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationships among abusive supervision, in-role behavior, career commitment and work–life balance.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationships among abusive supervision, in-role behavior, career commitment and work–life balance.

Design/methodology/approach

The data were collected from 310 South Korean company employees using the survey method. To investigate the research hypotheses, structural equation modeling analysis was conducted.

Findings

This study found negative effects of abusive supervision on in-role behavior, career commitment and work–life balance. Career commitment and work–life balance has the positive influences on in-role behavior. These results support the research hypotheses.

Research limitations/implications

Although this study empirically confirmed the negative effects of abusive supervision on employees’ attitudes toward their careers, lives and working behavior, the influence of cultural aspects was not considered. This study found mediating effects of work–life balance and career commitment.

Practical implications

This study points out that one leader with abusive supervision can negate all organizational efforts aimed at employees’ well-being because the influence of leaders on employees’ careers, lives and working behavior is very critical.

Originality/value

This paper provides a comprehensive understanding of the relationships between abusive supervision and other related variables from a human resource development perspective.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 55 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 June 2016

Taejun Cho and Kiung Ryu

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationships among self-efficacy, family-work conflict, social comparison standards, career expectation (CE), and career success…

1621

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationships among self-efficacy, family-work conflict, social comparison standards, career expectation (CE), and career success through surveying the faculties of two major universities in Shandong Province, China.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected through online survey instruments returned by 147 university women faculties from the two major universities in the region.

Findings

The results showed that: there was a significantly negative relationship between social comparison standards targeting to men and CE; self-efficacy was both impact statistically on family-work conflict and social comparison standards. This study found that the perceptions of CEs of Chinese women faculties were impacted by social comparison standards that could be directly perceived from men through observing and communicating with them. On the other hand, family-work conflict, which indirectly impacted on their CE, was not statistically significant, even though it significantly bothered them. Moreover, by investing the moderate effect of self-efficacy, it was a very important factor which helped them to develop their CEs.

Originality/value

Since the higher self-efficacy group had higher CEs, increasing self-efficacy should be a prerequisite to help them develop their careers. Still, Chinese women faculties of two major universities in Shandong Province had low CE, high family-work conflict, and felt an inequality in career against men.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 31 August 2020

Taejun (David) Lee, Bruce A. Huhmann and TaiWoong Yun

Government policy mandates information disclosure in financial communications to protect consumer welfare. Unfortunately, low readability can hamper information disclosures’…

13697

Abstract

Purpose

Government policy mandates information disclosure in financial communications to protect consumer welfare. Unfortunately, low readability can hamper information disclosures’ meaningful benefits to financial decision making. Thus, this experiment tests the product evaluation and decision satisfaction of Korean consumers with less or more subjective knowledge and with or without personal finance education.

Design/methodology/approach

A between-subjects experiment examined responses of a nationally representative sample of 400 Korean consumers toward a Korean-language credit card advertisement.

Findings

Financial knowledge improves financial product evaluation and decision satisfaction. More readable disclosures improved evaluation and satisfaction among less knowledgeable consumers. Less readable disclosures did not. Consumers without financial education exhibited lower evaluations and decision satisfaction regardless of readability. More knowledgeable consumers and those with financial education performed equally well regardless of disclosure readability.

Practical implications

Financial service providers seeking more accurate evaluations and better decision satisfaction among their customers should use easier-to-read disclosures when targeting consumers with less prior financial knowledge.

Social implications

One-size-fits-all financial communications are unlikely to achieve public policy or consumer well-being goals. Government-mandated information should be complemented by augmenting financial knowledge and providing personal finance training.

Originality/value

Although almost a quarter of the world’s population lives in East Asia, this is the first examination of readability in disclosures written in East Asian characters rather than a Western alphabet. Previous readability research on Asian-originating financial disclosures has been conducted on English-language texts. This study extends knowledge of readability effects to growing East Asian markets.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 38 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

Keywords

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