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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1998

Susannah Read and Denise Worsfold

A nutritional analysis of the weekly menus from 24 residential homes was conducted and information gathered by questionnaire on the planning, preparation and service of meals. The…

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Abstract

A nutritional analysis of the weekly menus from 24 residential homes was conducted and information gathered by questionnaire on the planning, preparation and service of meals. The nutritional standard of the menus complied with many of the nutritional guidelines in the Caroline Walker Trust (CWT) Report (1995). Meals, if eaten, would provide sufficient energy and nutrients to meet most of the dietary needs of the elderly residents. However, the menus provided an inadequate amount of starch, fibre and Vitamin D and a higher than recommended level of sugar and salt. Menus complied with the recommendations in the CWT Report, with familiar traditional home cooked dishes, a variety of vegetables, different main course items and a selection of puddings. Adequate drinks and snacks were provided between formal meals. However, for many residents there was no choice at meals, meals were pre‐plated and there was a lack of variety with weekly repeated meals.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 98 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 31 January 2024

Erik Champion and Susannah Emery

Engaging with digital heritage requires understanding not only to comprehend what is simulated but also the reasons leading to its creation and curation, and how to ensure both…

Abstract

Engaging with digital heritage requires understanding not only to comprehend what is simulated but also the reasons leading to its creation and curation, and how to ensure both the digital media and the significance of the cultural heritage it portrays are passed on effectively, meaningfully, and appropriately. The United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization defines ‘digital heritage’ to comprise of computer-based materials of enduring value some of which require active preservation strategies to maintain them for years to come.

With the proliferation of digital technologies and digital media, computer games have increasingly been seen as not only depicters of cultural heritage and platforms for virtual heritage scholarship and dissemination but also as digital cultural artefacts worthy of preservation. In this chapter, we examine how games (both digital and non-digital) can communicate cultural heritage in a galleries, libraries, archives, and museums [GLAM] setting. We also consider how they can and have been used to explore, communicate, and preserve heritage and, in particular, Indigenous heritage. Despite their apparently transient and ephemeral nature, especially compared to conventional media such as books, we argue computer games can be incorporated into active preservation approaches to digital heritage. Indeed, they may be of value to cultural heritage that needs to be not only viewed but also viscerally experienced or otherwise performed.

Details

Data Curation and Information Systems Design from Australasia: Implications for Cataloguing of Vernacular Knowledge in Galleries, Libraries, Archives, and Museums
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80455-615-3

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 August 2013

Bonnie-Kate Dewar

24

Abstract

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Social Care and Neurodisability, vol. 4 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-0919

Article
Publication date: 24 January 2022

Roseann Maguire, Carol Pert, Susannah Baines, Amanda Gillooly, Richard P. Hastings, Chris Hatton, Dave Dagnan and Andrew Jahoda

The COVID-19 pandemic meant that it became impossible for many individuals with intellectual disability to access specialist mental health support. The purpose of this study was…

138

Abstract

Purpose

The COVID-19 pandemic meant that it became impossible for many individuals with intellectual disability to access specialist mental health support. The purpose of this study was to evaluate a set of guided self-help resources adapted for delivery on an outreach basis.

Design/methodology/approach

The use and impact of the resources were evaluated through: data about downloads and requests for printed materials; interviews with individuals who used the resources; webinars with organisations; family members and support workers who had delivered the resources and an online survey with individuals who had delivered the resources.

Findings

The resources had considerable reach, with over 12,555 printed copies requested from across Scotland. The materials were perceived to be relevant and useful, helping individuals to talk about difficulties and to be aware that others were facing similar challenges.

Originality/value

The findings highlight the potential long-term value of guided self-help resources to help promote well-being that can be delivered on an outreach basis by family members and social care organisations.

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

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Article
Publication date: 12 August 2013

Ava Easton

25

Abstract

Details

Social Care and Neurodisability, vol. 4 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-0919

Content available
186

Abstract

Details

The Bottom Line, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0888-045X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 January 2018

Susannah Baines and Chris Hatton

People with learning disabilities are at risk of poor health and premature death. Due to these inequalities, NHS trusts are required to make reasonable adjustments to their care…

Abstract

Purpose

People with learning disabilities are at risk of poor health and premature death. Due to these inequalities, NHS trusts are required to make reasonable adjustments to their care, such as longer appointment times, with the legal duty on them being “anticipatory”. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

Secondary analysis of CQC acute hospital inspection reports asking the following research questions: Do CQC inspection reports mention people with learning disabilities? Where issues concerning people with learning disabilities are reported in CQC hospital inspection reports, what issues and reasonable adjustments are reported? Are there any relationships between comments made in the inspection reports and CQC ratings of the trusts?

Findings

In total, 29 of the 30 trust-wide inspection reports (97 per cent) and 58 of the 61 specific site reports (95 per cent) included at least one mention of people with learning disability/ies. Most comments about practices for people with learning disabilities were positive across all CQC inspection output types and across all CQC overall ratings, although the proportion of positive comments decreased and the proportion of negative comments increased as CQC ratings became less positive.

Research limitations/implications

Overall the authors found that CQC inspection reports routinely contained some information regarding how well the hospitals were working for people with learning disabilities. The depth of information in reports varied across trusts, with the potential for CQC reports to more consistently report information collected during inspections.

Originality/value

The report updates and extends a report published by the Public Health England Learning Disabilities Observatory in 2015.

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 23 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 February 2021

Susannah Micaela Hanlon

The study aims to explore and discuss the extent of influence of informal communication on learning in a European social democracy political party through a dual lens approach…

Abstract

Purpose

The study aims to explore and discuss the extent of influence of informal communication on learning in a European social democracy political party through a dual lens approach combining information behaviour and organisational learning perspectives.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper presents results from an in depth qualitative study, whereby data were collected through semi-structured and episodic narrative interviews. Template analysis was used.

Findings

Informal conversations were identified as intrinsic to the work of the political party. They did influence learning at individual and group levels, and there was a degree of diffusion within the organisation, although the latter was found to depend on opportunity, individual self-efficacy, level of involvement in the party and perceptions of who has influence. The dual lens approach facilitated greater levels of granularity of analysis at individual and group levels of learning.

Research limitations/implications

The paper highlights the benefits of using a dual lens approach to add depth to the interpretation of the research findings. Due to the small number of participants further research is needed to verify and extend the results and support a greater degree of transferability.

Originality/value

The information behaviour and organisational research theory that underpin the research have not been used together in this way before, and the context for the phenomenon being researched, a traditional political party struggling against the rise of populism in the 21st century, is both contemporary and understudied in each of the theory areas.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 77 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 July 1938

OUR various accounts of the Portsmouth Conference, and the official record of it which is now in the hands of readers shows that it may be regarded as a successful one. It was…

Abstract

OUR various accounts of the Portsmouth Conference, and the official record of it which is now in the hands of readers shows that it may be regarded as a successful one. It was specially notable for the absence of those bickerings and differences which must inevitably come to the surface at times. There may be something in the suggestion of one of our writers that the weather was a main factor. However that may be, there was uniform good temper, and we came away with the belief that a good week's work for librarianship had been done.

Details

New Library World, vol. 41 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1987

Established six years ago as a pioneer of short courses for young people wishing to develop their acting skills, the Oxford School of Drama offers unique introductory two‐week…

Abstract

Established six years ago as a pioneer of short courses for young people wishing to develop their acting skills, the Oxford School of Drama offers unique introductory two‐week acting courses during July and August, and an Edinburgh Festival Performance course of four weeks in August/September. As part of a recent expansion full‐time courses of one year or two for committed students are also offered. Courses take place in a converted eighteenth‐century farmhouse in the rural outskirts of Oxford. A number of famous names are associated with the School. Denholm Elliot is Patron, and Prunella Scales, Roger Rees and Susannah York are just a few of the celebrities already on the invitation list for visiting lecturers in 1987. Courses are run by professional actors and directors whose first‐hand knowledge of the theatre is ideally suited to encourage the aspiring performer. Voice‐training, movement classes, mime, improvisation and the opportunity to “tread the boards” in public are all included in the busy programme. Open auditions in London and Oxford will be held between March and May 1987 to select students for the different courses; experience is not essential.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 29 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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