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1 – 10 of over 2000
Article
Publication date: 9 December 2011

Kate Cavanagh, Nick Seccombe, Nicky Lidbetter and Dawn Bunnell

Around the UK, a number of strategies are being employed to expand the availability and increase the accessibility of psychological treatments for anxiety and depression…

Abstract

Purpose

Around the UK, a number of strategies are being employed to expand the availability and increase the accessibility of psychological treatments for anxiety and depression. Recommended interventions include supported self‐help programs based on CBT principles such as computerised cognitive behavioural therapies (CCBT) for mild‐to‐moderate depression, phobia, and panic. This paper seeks to describe innovative third sector, service‐user led CCBT clinics commissioned within Greater Manchester.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper describes how the project was initially set up, how the services are managed, how they work, and the impact of these services on the population they serve.

Findings

The CCBT clinic achieves a high throughput of service‐users, including more than one‐third accessing the service through self‐referral. Intake and outcome measures suggest that CCBT service users are representative of both the local population and those accessing increasing access to psychological therapies (IAPT) services for common mental health problems. For those engaging with the CCBT service, outcomes are equivalent to those reported in NHS‐based demonstration IAPT services. Service users highly value the service offered including the computer‐based programs and the support offered by paid and voluntary staff.

Practical implications

Roll out of this effective service model is recommended.

Originality/value

This paper has described a successful third‐sector, user‐led, CCBT self‐help clinic offering a Tier‐2 service for anxiety and depression that meets local needs. This will be of interest to service users, providers, and commissioners who want to develop similar services.

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 August 2008

Jim White, A Joice, S Petrie, S Johnston, D Gilroy, P Hutton and N Hynes

STEPS is a primary care mental health team that has attempted to develop a very high volume multi‐level, multi‐purpose service for those with mild to moderate problems…

Abstract

STEPS is a primary care mental health team that has attempted to develop a very high volume multi‐level, multi‐purpose service for those with mild to moderate problems. The service attempts to overcome many of the limitations of more traditional services. This paper describes the services contained within the six level model.

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 September 2004

Carol‐Ann Murray‐Mohammed and Hilary Guite

This article outlines the mental health promotion strategy developed by Greenwich teaching Primary Care Trust (tPCT). The strategy focuses on four themes: isolation…

Abstract

This article outlines the mental health promotion strategy developed by Greenwich teaching Primary Care Trust (tPCT). The strategy focuses on four themes: isolation, anxiety and depression, sleep, and stigma and discrimination. The aim is to address mental health promotion for all as well as targeted action for higher risk groups, in recognition of the great contrasts, diversity and significant economic inequalities that characterise the borough. A key challenge has been to integrate mental health promotion with wider agendas and it is intended that the strategy will inform other important areas of work in the borough, such as the neighbourhood renewal and health benefits regeneration programmes.

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

Article
Publication date: 7 September 2012

David Palmer, Sarah Pittaway, Lindsey Cook, Sandra Garner, Sue Holtum, Jackie Sansom and Charu Bassi

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the impact of guided self‐help cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) for mothers with depression and/or anxiety undertaken in two…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the impact of guided self‐help cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) for mothers with depression and/or anxiety undertaken in two Sure Start children's centres in the London Borough of Bexley.

Design/methodology/approach

A quantitative study was carried out involving 23 participants who attended an initial appointment with a Psychological Well‐being Practitioner and who were assessed and allocated to a guided self‐help CBT intervention (either workbooks or computer‐based). In addition, in‐depth interviews were undertaken with nine participants who had completed the programme.

Findings

The study finds that guided self‐help CBT produced a significant clinical benefit for participants with mild to moderate depression and/or anxiety. Narratives with participants also highlighted improved confidence and self‐esteem, positive thinking and better coping strategies, which may have a positive impact on their children and families. This research also demonstrated the importance of a partnership approach to providing therapeutic interventions for vulnerable groups such as those in this study.

Originality/value

The findings represent a “snap‐shot” of the positive effects of guided self‐help CBT for those suffering maternal depression. They demonstrate the need to recognise and support the therapeutic social milieu, particularly in settings that are familiar and accessible. In addition, psychological interventions that include facilitative holistic working and inter‐agency working can be particularly effective.

Details

Journal of Children's Services, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-6660

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1995

Terry Morrow

BIDS (Bath Information & Data Services) has been running end‐user bibliographic database services since February 1991. Since then, the service has seen steady growth in…

Abstract

BIDS (Bath Information & Data Services) has been running end‐user bibliographic database services since February 1991. Since then, the service has seen steady growth in the number of users, the number of sites subscribing, the range of databases and the facilities provided for users. There is evidence of a widespread awareness of BIDS services, both within the UK academic community, and elsewhere, in industry and overseas. This paper outlines the development of the BIDS service, and the facilities it currently offers. It reviews the growth of the service and looks at the lessons learned. In particular it will look at how user feedback is being taken into account in re‐implementing the service on a new platform. It will also review the way in which different support strategies have worked in practice, and consider how the use of network tools such as the World Wide Web could help provide effective end‐user support to this and other similar services.

Details

Program, vol. 29 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0033-0337

Article
Publication date: 21 January 2022

Lisa Richardson

The purpose of this paper is to provide a commentary on “Adapted guided self-help booklets for supporting the wellbeing of people with intellectual disabilities during the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a commentary on “Adapted guided self-help booklets for supporting the wellbeing of people with intellectual disabilities during the COVID-19 pandemic” (Jahoda et al.).

Design/methodology/approach

This paper considers health and wellbeing for people with intellectual disabilities in the context of public health interventions and public health research.

Findings

Consideration is given to the evidence base for self-management, self-help and behavioural change interventions and the need to consider systemic support for promoting the health and wellbeing of people with intellectual disabilities.

Originality/value

Guided self-help and self-management techniques have a role in the health promotion of people with intellectual disabilities. Reciprocal sharing between public health researchers and intellectual disability researchers is needed to further the research, policy and service agenda to better promote health and wellbeing for this underserved group.

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 24 January 2022

Roseann Maguire, Carol Pert, Susannah Baines, Amanda Gillooly, Richard P. Hastings, Chris Hatton, Dave Dagnan and Andrew Jahoda

The COVID-19 pandemic meant that it became impossible for many individuals with intellectual disability to access specialist mental health support. The purpose of this…

Abstract

Purpose

The COVID-19 pandemic meant that it became impossible for many individuals with intellectual disability to access specialist mental health support. The purpose of this study was to evaluate a set of guided self-help resources adapted for delivery on an outreach basis.

Design/methodology/approach

The use and impact of the resources were evaluated through: data about downloads and requests for printed materials; interviews with individuals who used the resources; webinars with organisations; family members and support workers who had delivered the resources and an online survey with individuals who had delivered the resources.

Findings

The resources had considerable reach, with over 12,555 printed copies requested from across Scotland. The materials were perceived to be relevant and useful, helping individuals to talk about difficulties and to be aware that others were facing similar challenges.

Originality/value

The findings highlight the potential long-term value of guided self-help resources to help promote well-being that can be delivered on an outreach basis by family members and social care organisations.

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 2001

Bronwen Brown

128

Abstract

Details

Reference Reviews, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0950-4125

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 May 2017

Eddie Chaplin and Karina Marshall-Tate

The purpose of this paper is to examine guided self-help (GSH), and some of the barriers as to why it is not routinely available for people with intellectual disabilities (IDs).

175

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine guided self-help (GSH), and some of the barriers as to why it is not routinely available for people with intellectual disabilities (IDs).

Design/methodology/approach

This paper offers an overview of GSH and the potential benefits of it as an intervention for people with ID with mild depression and/or anxiety.

Findings

The current literature reports the successful use and effectiveness of GSH in the general population. However, despite this there is little evidence that it is being used in practice for people with ID.

Originality/value

This paper offers an overview of GSH and advocates for its increasing use for people with ID to help bring about equality in mental healthcare.

Details

Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1282

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 March 2012

Liz Brewster, Barbara Sen and Andrew Cox

The purpose of this paper is to explore how the use of self‐help bibliotherapy developed from a local pilot scheme to become national policy in Wales. Analysis aims to…

1724

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore how the use of self‐help bibliotherapy developed from a local pilot scheme to become national policy in Wales. Analysis aims to focus on the use of evidence‐based practice (EBP) as a justification in the process of policy creation.

Design/methodology/approach

A mixed methodological approach was used to gather data, incorporating semi‐structured interviews, documents, and descriptive statistics. Actor‐network theory (ANT) was used as a critical lens to frame analysis.

Findings

The study finds that the translation from local pilot to national initiative was achieved using legitimising discourses including EBP. These discourses were used selectively, and in response to the needs of the focal actors in the network. The complex relationship between EBP and self‐help bibliotherapy is explored in connection with healthcare policy, concluding that the use of EBP legitimises a lack of patient‐centred evaluation.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations of the research include a lack of engagement with patients using the scheme, and future research should aim to present a more patient‐centred account to complement this policy‐focused work.

Originality/value

Little in‐depth work has been conducted on the strategy behind the introduction of bibliotherapy schemes in the UK or elsewhere, and this paper presents an in‐depth theoretical analysis of the first nationwide bibliotherapy scheme in the world.

1 – 10 of over 2000