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Book part
Publication date: 24 November 2010

David Tantow

This chapter discusses the impact of tourism on the Kampong Glam Islamic heritage site in Singapore. For tourism development purposes, the main artery of the district was…

Abstract

This chapter discusses the impact of tourism on the Kampong Glam Islamic heritage site in Singapore. For tourism development purposes, the main artery of the district was converted into a pedestrian mall. Planners tried to connect contemporary marketing initiatives for Islamic heritage with the historic role of Kampong Glam as a pilgrim destination, and attempted to legitimize the intense interventions. Despite these efforts, the rapidly induced changes have caused alienation of parts of the local Muslim community from the district. The chapter portrays the challenge to showcase Kampong Glam as a center of Singapore's Islamic heritage for interested tourists, while retaining the district's role as a homestead for the local Muslim minority.

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Tourism in the Muslim World
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-920-6

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Book part
Publication date: 15 October 2018

Gareth Heritage

Glam metal of the 1980s represented a notable development in popular music at this time. A subgenre of 1980s heavy metal, glam metal combined elements of late 1960s and…

Abstract

Glam metal of the 1980s represented a notable development in popular music at this time. A subgenre of 1980s heavy metal, glam metal combined elements of late 1960s and 1970s heavy rock, glam rock and punk rock, enriching both the visual and aural aesthetic diversity of 1980s heavy metal as a result. Moreover, 1980s glam metal bands such as Guns N’ Roses and Poison, Cinderella and Mötley Crüe, Ratt and Warrant, dominated the music video airwaves and sold out venues across the United States. Yet, for all its comparative individuality and widespread popularity, the vast majority of mainstream glam metal bands were marginalised by social action groups mainly, but not exclusively, because of misogynist-type themes that the bands represented in their aesthetics.

During the 1990s, scholars began scrutinising 1980s glam metal’s misogynist aesthetics, for example, Lisa Sloat’s (1998) analysis of glam metal’s sexist and misogynist themed song lyrics concludes that, ‘if exploiting women for sex sells, [glam metal] musicians will [continue] record[ing] songs which do so’ (Sloat, 1998, p. 299). Yet none of these accounts seem to be able to sufficiently unpack the idea that 1980s glam metal’s representation of misogyny was anything other than fundamentally egregious. An alternative reading of the aesthetics shows us how many of the bands creatively appropriated misogyny to idiomatically hallmark metal glam, thus differentiating the style from the broadly homogenous displays of machismo that generally defined the aesthetics of other 1980s heavy metal subgenres. In response then, this chapter should be thought of as a doctrine provactive, intended to elicit a debate about the need to look alternatively at how misogyny is/was used as an artistic aesthetic device, not only in 1980s glam metal, but throughout culture more widely.

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Subcultures, Bodies and Spaces: Essays on Alternativity and Marginalization
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-512-8

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Article
Publication date: 5 March 2018

Dinesh K. Gupta and Veerbala Sharma

The purpose of this paper is to find out the status/levels of using crowdsourcing in galleries, libraries, archives and museums (GLAM) around the globe and to give…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to find out the status/levels of using crowdsourcing in galleries, libraries, archives and museums (GLAM) around the globe and to give suggestions on how Indian GLAM can take the benefit of this global trend.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is based on the analytical study of the literature available on the embracing crowdsourcing for diverse tasks with special emphasis on the efforts of GLAM domain regarding the development of digital repositories.

Findings

Meticulous analysis of literature and case studies give an overview of the diverse practices of public participation/crowd collaboration in the development of digital repositories around the globe. However, Indian GLAM are far behind in adopting such practices.

Practical implications

With the rapid growth in digital information and Web-based technology, GLAM around the world encourage and engage public participation in various digitization projects to enrich and enhance their digital collections and place them on the Web. However, Indian GLAM still refrain to accept and adopt such practices. Thus, this paper will encourage and motivate the Indian GLAM to enrich and enhance their collection with crowd contribution and uploading them on Web.

Originality/value

This is an original paper and has great implementation value. During the study, enormous literature was available on crowd participation in various areas around the globe, as well as in India. International examples of crowd participation in GLAM creation are found in the literature; however, not sufficient evidences are found regarding crowd contribution in Indian GLAM. Hence, the paper, by presenting the evidences of crowd participation in GLAM domain, proposes the Indian GLAM to exploit the benefits of this practice for Indian digital repositories to expedite the creation and development of various national digital repositories.

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Article
Publication date: 13 November 2019

Elizabeth McCarthy

In order to develop a common framework for strategic planning and evaluation, the Gardens, Libraries and Museums (GLAM) of Oxford undertook a process for defining digital…

Abstract

Purpose

In order to develop a common framework for strategic planning and evaluation, the Gardens, Libraries and Museums (GLAM) of Oxford undertook a process for defining digital audiences, undertaking user research to inform a new audience framework, which, in turn, is feeding a new approach and the application of the research across the Libraries’ web redevelopment. The paper aims to discuss this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

GLAM used qualitative and quantitative techniques to understand how visitors engaged with GLAM digitally: visitor shadowing, exit interviews, diary studies, remote interviews, social media and data evaluation. From these, GLAM focussed on motivational archetypes that apply to visitors across the institutions as well as pen portraits to support those archetypes, and a template for creating new portraits.

Findings

The framework helped GLAM develop digital priorities and outline how digital output met the needs of all audiences from a bottom-up user perspective, rather than only through top-down institutional decision making. Most relevant here, learning from the user research hugely informed the Bodleian Libraries’ website redevelopment. The Bodleian Libraries’ work within that framework shows that such a body of research is not solely high level; it can be applied on an institutional and project level to great effect.

Originality/value

Focussing on motivations rather than demographics is a less common way to approach digital audiences. Developing such a cohesive framework for digital audiences before undertaking strategic planning and specific development projects proved a valuable piece of work from which other institutions can learn.

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Performance Measurement and Metrics, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-8047

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Article
Publication date: 8 August 2016

Debra A. Riley-Huff, Kevin Herrera, Susan Ivey and Tina Harry

This paper aims to examine the fundraising strategy known as crowdfunding because it applies to galleries, libraries, archives and museums (GLAM) and to share a…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the fundraising strategy known as crowdfunding because it applies to galleries, libraries, archives and museums (GLAM) and to share a crowdfunding case study experience.

Design/methodology/approach

A rich literature review provides the basis for understanding the central issues related to crowdfunding. Survey data provides information about the perception and experiences of other GLAM organizations with crowdfunding, and a case study shares an experience with the fundraising method.

Findings

Some GLAM organizations are attempting crowdfunding projects with varied levels of success, whereas others remain unsure but curious. The case study shares one academic library’s direct experience with crowdfunding.

Research limitations/implications

There is little research currently available related to library use of crowdfunding.

Practical implications

This paper provides a resource and research starting point for GLAM organizations interested in the crowdfunding model.

Originality/value

In a comprehensive manner, this article provides much needed research on the current state of crowdfunding as it pertains to GLAM organizations.

Details

The Bottom Line, vol. 29 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0888-045X

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Article
Publication date: 28 September 2017

Amber L. Cushing and Benjamin R. Cowan

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how non-research users access and use digital surrogates from archival collections via mobile walking tour app. Much of the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how non-research users access and use digital surrogates from archival collections via mobile walking tour app. Much of the existing literature that discusses outreach for digitised archival collections in libraries, archives and museums (LAMs) reports examples of single outreach events or discusses outreach broadly, without critically exploring the purpose and context of outreach as an activity. Further, these reports generally aim to introduce collections to potential researchers, amateur or professional, without consideration of how the collections could be used for purposes other than research, by non-researchers. The study aims to expand understanding of non-research use of digital surrogates contextualised by mobile technology.

Design/methodology/approach

Utilising an exploratory approach, Walk1916, a mobile walking tour app of Easter Rising sites in Dublin was first developed. It contextualised digital surrogates from archival collections, along with an audio and a textual description of the image, with augmented reality (AR) and geolocation technology. In all, 15 semi-structured interviews were then conducted to understand how contextualising digital surrogates with these mobile technology features influenced participants’ perceptions of the digital surrogate. Interview transcripts were transcribed and analysed via memoing and coding, using nVivo for Mac 10.2.2.

Findings

Findings from interview data suggest that contextualising the digital surrogate with AR and geolocation features allowed participants to perceive of the digital surrogate as enhancing their understanding of the Easter Rising, enhancing life and allowing for increased control of their experience.

Originality/value

This furthers work in the area of how individuals value digital surrogates, in different (non-research) contexts. These findings provide groundwork for the future study of non-research access to and use of digital surrogates held in institutional collections so that LAMs can utilise collections efficiently for a wider user base.

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Journal of Documentation, vol. 73 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

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Article
Publication date: 20 September 2011

Shirley Lim and Chern Li Liew

This study aims to explore how metadata have been applied in GLAM (galleries, libraries, archives and museums) institutions in New Zealand (NZ) and to analyse its overall…

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4191

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore how metadata have been applied in GLAM (galleries, libraries, archives and museums) institutions in New Zealand (NZ) and to analyse its overall quality with the interoperability of the metadata element set especially in mind.

Design/methodology/approach

The first stage of data collection involved an analysis of the metadata records from 16 institutions from the NZ GLAM sector to examine the types and extent of metadata used. However, by looking at publicly accessible metadata records, it was impossible to determine the full extent of metadata created, especially when there could be metadata that were kept in‐house. This was complemented with interviewing of staff from the institutions concerned.

Findings

The study found that metadata records for digital images in four types of institutions have different emphases on metadata functions and a variety of metadata are not applied on a consistent basis. The lack of technical data in metadata records means that digital visual images are not always well protected. There is a consensus among those interviewed that metadata sharing is important. However, the wide use of a proprietary system which comes with pre‐existing metadata fields could result in a lack of flexibility and a risk that institutions adopt cataloguing practices to accommodating their collection management systems rather than to the requirements for interoperability and long‐term preservation.

Originality/value

In addition to studying metadata quality in GLAM digital image repositories, the study also examined the rationale and factors affecting the current practice via interviews with representatives from the institutions concerned. This shed light on potential barriers to interoperability that warranted further examination.

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 63 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

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Article
Publication date: 6 February 2017

Dinesh K. Gupta and Veerbala Sharma

The purpose of this paper is to identify the status of digitization of manuscripts in India and to give suggestions to transcribe these manuscripts easily, effortlessly…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify the status of digitization of manuscripts in India and to give suggestions to transcribe these manuscripts easily, effortlessly and expeditiously.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is based on the analytical study of the literature available on global efforts in respect of documentation, preservation, conservation and digitization of manuscripts with special emphasis on the efforts of “namami” (acronym for National Manuscript Mission) for Indian manuscripts.

Findings

Meticulous analysis of literature and case studies give an overview of the diverse practices of public participation/crowd collaboration to transcribe and tagging of the rare and old historical documents around the globe. However, Indian libraries are far behind in adopting such practices.

Practical implications

India has a very rich cultural, educational and research heritage preserved in the form of manuscripts. These thousands of manuscripts are significant source of knowledge base for many researchers, however, despite their heritage value, these remain inaccessible to the researchers because of their being scattered and unpublished form. Moreover, even the digitized manuscripts remain difficult to use by the researchers because of immense linguistic diversity and scripts. Documentation and digitization of these manuscripts will not only preserve the invaluable heritage of India but also will enable their easy and vast access by the researchers globally. With the rapid growth in digital information and web-based technology, galleries, libraries, archives and museums (GLAM) around the world encourage and engage public participation in various digitization projects to enrich and enhance their digital collections and place them on the web. However, Indian GLAM still refrains to accept and adopt such practices. Thus this paper will encourage and motivate the Indian GLAM to expedite their digitization and uploading them on web for tagging and transcribing.

Originality/value

This is an original paper and has great implementation value. During the study enormous literature was available on digitization of Indian manuscripts. However, not even a single study could be found on tagging and transcription of these manuscripts, specifically crowd contribution in this area. Hence, the paper, by presenting the evidences of crowd participation for the tagging and transcription of manuscripts globally, proposes the Indian GLAM to exploit the benefits of this practice for Indian manuscripts also in order to expedite the tagging process to enhance their usage.

Details

Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1266

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Article
Publication date: 20 November 2017

Karen F. Gracy

The purpose of this paper is to examine the current state of Linked Data (LD) in archival moving image description, and propose ways in which current metadata records can…

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1088

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the current state of Linked Data (LD) in archival moving image description, and propose ways in which current metadata records can be enriched and enhanced by interlinking such metadata with relevant information found in other data sets.

Design/methodology/approach

Several possible metadata models for moving image production and archiving are considered, including models from records management, digital curation, and the recent BIBFRAME AV Modeling Study. This research also explores how mappings between archival moving image records and relevant external data sources might be drawn, and what gaps exist between current vocabularies and what is needed to record and make accessible the full lifecycle of archiving through production, use, and reuse.

Findings

The author notes several major impediments to implementation of LD for archival moving images. The various pieces of information about creators, places, and events found in moving image records are not easily connected to relevant information in other sources because they are often not semantically defined within the record and can be hidden in unstructured fields. Libraries, archives, and museums must work on aligning the various vocabularies and schemas of potential value for archival moving image description to enable interlinking between vocabularies currently in use and those which are used by external data sets. Alignment of vocabularies is often complicated by mismatches in granularity between vocabularies.

Research limitations/implications

The focus is on how these models inform functional requirements for access and other archival activities, and how the field might benefit from having a common metadata model for critical archival descriptive activities.

Practical implications

By having a shared model, archivists may more easily align current vocabularies and develop new vocabularies and schemas to address the needs of moving image data creators and scholars.

Originality/value

Moving image archives, like other cultural institutions with significant heritage holdings, can benefit tremendously from investing in the semantic definition of information found in their information databases. While commercial entities such as search engines and data providers have already embraced the opportunities that semantic search provides for resource discovery, most non-commercial entities are just beginning to do so. Thus, this research addresses the benefits and challenges of enriching and enhancing archival moving image records with semantically defined information via LD.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 74 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

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Article
Publication date: 20 March 2017

Steve O’Connor, Ian Smith and Waseem Afzal

The skill set required to be a professional in any profession is inherent in the qualifications required for entrance to that profession. The ability to demonstrate…

Abstract

Purpose

The skill set required to be a professional in any profession is inherent in the qualifications required for entrance to that profession. The ability to demonstrate leadership in the middle to upper echelons of that profession is demonstrably different. The School of Information Studies at the Charles Sturt University in Wagga Wagga Australia sought to explore what a postgraduate qualification in the leadership of the profession might look like and what the demand for such a qualification might be. The purpose of this paper is to detail that research effort and the outcomes.

Design/methodology/approach

The study undertook a number of different approaches including engaging in networks of professional colleagues globally and a series of focus groups in Brisbane, Sydney and Melbourne. The outcomes were analyzed in terms of the expectations of what a new degree might contain as well as the enrollment prospects for such a degree.

Findings

There was a strong ground-swell of support for a new degree of Masters of Information Leadership. The combination of subjects from the LIS environment together with subjects from a MBA environment was strongly endorsed. These areas of interest were documented in the paper along with recommendations.

Research limitations/implications

There is a fertile ground for research here in two ways. First, there is much scope for the examination of the course requirements and how they sit in a future work environment. This is especially the case where there is a convergence of the interests of the galleries, libraries, archives and museums sectors. Second, there is much to be done as the authors look at leadership skills sets for future information environments which are highly speculative.

Practical implications

This study has produced a set of requirements for a new Masters of Information Leadership. It is a very useful set of requirements to base future studies. There was also a very strong requirement for real life aspects to such a course rather than theoretical exercises as has been the current academic practice.

Originality/value

This study is quite original as it sought to engage practitioners in different areas and sectors in Australia aiming to ensure that the resulting academic program was closely aligned with practitioner need.

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