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1 – 10 of 72
Article
Publication date: 1 February 2003

Susan M. Ogden and Nigel P. Grigg

In 1979, the UK set the standard on which the universally recognised ISO 9000 series was based. Part of the rationale for the creation of a generic quality assurance standard was…

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Abstract

In 1979, the UK set the standard on which the universally recognised ISO 9000 series was based. Part of the rationale for the creation of a generic quality assurance standard was that it would supplant the need for independent customer inspections, avoid duplications of audits, and coordinate the various national approaches to quality standards. Ironically, however, as the award has grown internationally, there has been a corresponding growth in the number and type of quality standards available to UK organisations. This paper reviews the development of sector‐based quality assurance standards in the UK leisure, hospitality and food industries and draws conclusions on the extent to which the various standards can be aligned. It is found that whereas industry‐specific standards in the food industry dovetail with generic standards, there is a degree of overlap in the hospitality and leisure sectors.

Details

The TQM Magazine, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-478X

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1994

Susan M. Ogden

The policy of compulsory competitive tendering (CCT) for local government manual services was widely extended by the Local Government Act 1988. The stated objective of this…

Abstract

The policy of compulsory competitive tendering (CCT) for local government manual services was widely extended by the Local Government Act 1988. The stated objective of this legislation was that competition would ensure value for money in the delivery of public services. Trade unionists interpreted the policy in largely negative terms seeing it as another central government tool to weaken the power of the collective thus forcing down the pay and conditions of their members.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 17 no. 7/8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

Article
Publication date: 1 January 2006

Susan M. Ogden, Duncan McTavish and Lindsay McKean

Females now comprise just over half of the workforce in the UK financial services sector. This paper aims to report on the current position relating to factors that are…

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Abstract

Purpose

Females now comprise just over half of the workforce in the UK financial services sector. This paper aims to report on the current position relating to factors that are facilitating and inhibiting women from moving into middle and senior levels of management within the financial services sector.

Design/methodology/approach

A comparative analysis of four case studies from a cross‐section of the financial services industry is presented, each compiled using interviews with male and female senior and middle managers, and gender‐defined focus groups usually of employees who are in the promotion pipeline.

Findings

Despite progress in the case study organisations, both men and women concur that females encounter more barriers to career progression in the industry than men and that these relate primarily to a long hours culture and networking. This leads some women to exclude themselves from working in certain parts of the industry, such as corporate banking. Further, this aspect of the industry culture tends to permeate into areas of the industry where these activities are less important for fostering client relationships.

Practical implications

The research implies that the industry needs to do more to make networking events and activities more gender neutral. Additionally, as more women move up the career pipeline, they should be encouraged to access networks that tap into their equivalent “female networks”.

Originality/value

The paper provides a current picture of managerial working life in the UK financial services industry and provides empirical evidence of the managerial work cultures within the sector.

Details

Women in Management Review, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-9425

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Article
Publication date: 2 October 2007

Adelina M. Broadbridge, Gillian A. Maxwell and Susan M. Ogden

The purpose of this paper is to examine Generation Y, potential graduate entrants to UK retailing, in respect of their job experiences, career perceptions and initial employment…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine Generation Y, potential graduate entrants to UK retailing, in respect of their job experiences, career perceptions and initial employment expectations.

Design/methodology/approach

Utilising qualitative research methods, an exploratory study was undertaken with 33 students (all of whom fell into the category of Generation Y) from two UK universities.

Findings

The study found that many of the propositions contained within the Generation Y literature were reflected among participants in relation to their future career and lifestyle aspirations. This points to the need for retailers to carefully manage graduate expectations and experiences to ensure commitment to the sector.

Research limitations/implications

Being an exploratory study, the results are not genralisable to the wider population. The findings frame a future longitudinal study on the retail careers of Generation Y graduates as they move from the anticipation to the encounter stage of their career development. This will seek to further explore the implications of Generation Y values, including those relating to diversity and equality which were not raised as an issue in this preliminary study.

Originality/value

The findings of this research contribute to our knowledge of the career aspirations of Generation Y. It indicates to retailers some of the future recruitment and HR practices they might adopt to meet the needs of this generation of employees.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 12 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

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Article
Publication date: 13 November 2007

Adelina M. Broadbridge, Gillian A. Maxwell and Susan M. Ogden

The aim of this paper is to highlight some preliminary findings regarding students' perceptions of retail employment. It concentrates on those students who belong to Generation Y…

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Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to highlight some preliminary findings regarding students' perceptions of retail employment. It concentrates on those students who belong to Generation Y, those born between 1977 and 1994.

Design/methodology/approach

The research instrument consisted of a questionnaire survey administered to business studies students at two Scottish universities – Glasgow Caledonian University and Stirling University. This paper reports on responses to 340 of these questionnaires – those students who already have some experience of retail employment, mainly as their part‐time employment experiences while studying for their degree.

Findings

Retail employment experience is common with the majority of students. Their expectations for future retail employment after graduation is to enjoy their work, while they are also concerned with fairness, equality and tolerance from their future employment.

Practical implications

The results are of benefit to retail employers' as preliminary indications of how they can attract potential graduate entrants into the sector. They provide some areas that retail companies should be addressing in their recruitment literature. These factors include future career opportunities including opportunities for self development, training and development, as well as pay and job security. Other factors that are also important to highlight are responsibility and challenging work opportunities and the maintenance of a good work‐life balance.

Originality/value

This is an under‐researched topic in the area of retail employment and Generation Y.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 35 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1998

Susan M. Ogden

This comment paper calls for a need to view benchmarking as a means to disseminate best practice in small hospitality organizations. Outlines the barriers to benchmarking in the…

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Abstract

This comment paper calls for a need to view benchmarking as a means to disseminate best practice in small hospitality organizations. Outlines the barriers to benchmarking in the sector and endorses the role and value of grading and award schemes as “external benchmarking” agencies.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 10 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 5 June 2007

Susan M. Ogden and Eileen McCorriston

The aim of this paper is to report the findings from a survey of UK conference and event managers, which highlights the benefits that can accrue from supplier management within…

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Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to report the findings from a survey of UK conference and event managers, which highlights the benefits that can accrue from supplier management within this sector.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey of venue managers covering a cross‐section of venue types was used.

Findings

A significant proportion of venue managers report having long‐term supplier relationships, placing considerable value on the non‐financial benefits that can accrue from long‐term supplier relations featuring mutual trust and good working relationships. These include consistency, responsiveness and flexibility in service delivery. Additionally, the familiarity of regular suppliers with the venue and its procedures, can lead to seamless service delivery to the customer and free‐up venue managers time.

Research limitations/implications

The research design provides a one‐sided view of supplier relationships.

Practical implications

Attention is drawn to the performance benefits arising from building supplier relationships and offers guidance as to how these can be sustained by avoiding the pitfalls on long‐term relationships. In doing so, the findings legitimise the importance of taking non‐financial considerations into account when awarding or renewing supply contracts.

Originality/value

This paper applies lessons emerging from research on supplier relationships to a growing, but under‐researched, sector of the hospitality industry.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 19 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2003

Gerard Croal, Susan M. Ogden and Nigel P. Grigg

Repair and maintenance play a key role in housing management and tenant satisfaction. In the UK, local authority housing departments have traditionally had these services carried…

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Abstract

Repair and maintenance play a key role in housing management and tenant satisfaction. In the UK, local authority housing departments have traditionally had these services carried out in‐house by local authority building services departments. For more than a decade, such departments have been under pressure to improve their efficiency and effectiveness from public policy initiatives such as compulsory competitive tendering and, more recently, best value. Within some authorities the transfer of housing stock from local authority control to housing associations with non‐profit‐making status is also adding to pressure for quality improvement by raising tenant expectations. Presents a case study of a total quality management initiative implemented within a local authority in Scotland facing precisely these pressures. The success of the quality improvement programme is examined, comparing the perceptions of the tenants and employees with key performance indicators. The pressures to succeed are high since, following an initial five‐year period of grace, the contract for the delivery of building services will only be renewed if the newly‐appointed housing association is satisfied with the efficiency and effectiveness of services delivered. The findings highlight the importance of managing the quality chain across organisational boundaries.

Details

Property Management, vol. 21 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7472

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Book part
Publication date: 8 February 2016

Susan Frelich Appleton and Susan Ekberg Stiritz

This paper explores four works of contemporary fiction to illuminate formal and informal regulation of sex. The paper’s co-authors frame analysis with the story of their creation…

Abstract

This paper explores four works of contemporary fiction to illuminate formal and informal regulation of sex. The paper’s co-authors frame analysis with the story of their creation of a transdisciplinary course, entitled “Regulating Sex: Historical and Cultural Encounters,” in which students mined literature for social critique, became immersed in the study of law and its limits, and developed increased sensitivity to power, its uses, and abuses. The paper demonstrates the value theoretically and pedagogically of third-wave feminisms, wild zones, and contact zones as analytic constructs and contends that including sex and sexualities in conversations transforms personal experience, education, society, and culture, including law.

Details

Special Issue: Feminist Legal Theory
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-782-0

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Article
Publication date: 8 July 2022

Stephen J. Perkins and Susan Shortland

The purpose of this paper is to explore the social construction of executive pay in the UK via an examination of narratives drawn from the social actors on the front-line of Key…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the social construction of executive pay in the UK via an examination of narratives drawn from the social actors on the front-line of Key Management Personnel (KMP) pay determination.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors' qualitative research draws upon in-depth interviews with non-executive directors (NEDs) serving on remuneration committees, institutional investors, and independent pay consultants.

Findings

Regulation, market pricing and risk mitigation together with the social processes inherent within discharging corporate governance responsibilities create a status-quo-preserving isomorphic effect, restricting context-sensitive approaches to KMP pay determination.

Practical implications

The paper informs action by company directors, investors and policy makers to address KMP pay controversies, building shared accountability amongst decision-makers focussed on more strategic context-aligned processes and outcomes.

Originality/value

The authors' analysis illustrates how institutional isomorphism can be applied to analyse social actors' interpretations within KMP pay decision-making. The authors show that normative, coercive and mimetic isomorphic forces must be applied in dynamic interaction to extend the explanatory power of institutional isomorphism through the creation of a “No-Come-In” effect in respect of contemporary KMP pay determination settings.

Details

Journal of Organizational Effectiveness: People and Performance, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2051-6614

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