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1 – 10 of over 5000
Article
Publication date: 20 March 2017

Marie-Christine Therrien, Julie-Maude Normandin and Jean-Louis Denis

Health systems are periodically confronted by crises – think of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome, H1N1, and Ebola – during which they are called upon to manage…

2269

Abstract

Purpose

Health systems are periodically confronted by crises – think of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome, H1N1, and Ebola – during which they are called upon to manage exceptional situations without interrupting essential services to the population. The ability to accomplish this dual mandate is at the heart of resilience strategies, which in healthcare systems involve developing surge capacity to manage a sudden influx of patients. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper relates insights from resilience research to the four “S” of surge capacity (staff, stuff, structures and systems) and proposes a framework based on complexity theory to better understand and assess resilience factors that enable the development of surge capacity in complex health systems.

Findings

Detailed and dynamic complexities manifest in different challenges during a crisis. Resilience factors are classified according to these types of complexity and along their temporal dimensions: proactive factors that improve preparedness to confront both usual and exceptional requirements, and passive factors that enable response to unexpected demands as they arise during a crisis. The framework is completed by further categorizing resilience factors according to their stabilizing or destabilizing impact, drawing on feedback processes described in complexity theory. Favorable order resilience factors create consistency and act as stabilizing forces in systems, while favorable disorder factors such as diversity and complementarity act as destabilizing forces.

Originality/value

The framework suggests a balanced and innovative process to integrate these factors in a pragmatic approach built around the fours “S” of surge capacity to increase health system resilience.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 31 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 March 2016

Quan Zhu, Harold Krikke and Marjolein Caniëls

The purpose of this paper is to investigate different combinations of collaboration strategies to deal with different types of supply chain disruptions, find the best…

1088

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate different combinations of collaboration strategies to deal with different types of supply chain disruptions, find the best combination, and provide targeting suggestions for investments.

Design/methodology/approach

A system dynamics simulation is applied to study a supply chain with three tiers: a producer, a logistics service provider (LSP), and a retailer. There are three types of disruptions to simulate: a producer capacity disruption, an LSP capacity disruption, and a demand disruption. As each tier has the option to choose whether or not to collaborate with the other two tiers, eight (2×2×2) scenarios are generated to represent different combinations of collaboration strategies.

Findings

For a producer capacity disruption, both the producer and the LSP should collaborate by providing their surge capacities, while the retailer does not have to collaborate. For an LSP capacity disruption, the producer should not provide its surge capacity, while the LSP should do so; the retailer does not have to collaborate. For a demand disruption, both the producer and the LSP should not provide their surge capacities, while the retailer should not collaborate but play shortage gaming. Targeting suggestions for investments are provided.

Originality/value

Through system dynamics modeling, this study allows the discussion of surge capacity to help supply chain partners and the discussion of shortage gaming when products are oversupplied, in a disruption recovery system over time.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 116 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Resilient Health Systems
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80262-273-7

Article
Publication date: 1 July 1972

D.O. BURNS and BSc(Eng) FIEE

Remote power control basically means control at a distance of major switching operations in a generating and distribution system.

Abstract

Remote power control basically means control at a distance of major switching operations in a generating and distribution system.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 44 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

Book part
Publication date: 1 June 2004

Myron D Fottler, Kourtney Scharoun and Reid M Oetjen

The possibility of a bioterrorism event haunts all healthcare organizations. We believe a bioterrorism event is more likely in an urban area, and that urban multiprovider…

Abstract

The possibility of a bioterrorism event haunts all healthcare organizations. We believe a bioterrorism event is more likely in an urban area, and that urban multiprovider systems will be the “first line healthcare responders.” Due to the lack of empirical research on this topic and firsthand experience with a bioterrorism event, this paper will provide the theoretical underpinnings to support the rationale for multiprovider systems as “first responders.” This chapter outlines the nature and challenges of bioterrorism for a healthcare organization, the likely “state of the art” preparations for such events on the part of the four categories of healthcare organizations, and finally, the implications for the structuring of multiprovider systems to enhance their ability to plan for, and respond to bioterrorism events. Potential future research issues are also addressed.

Details

Bioterrorism Preparedness, Attack and Response
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-268-9

Article
Publication date: 7 April 2015

Sanjita Jaipuria and S. S. Mahapatra

The purpose of this paper is to provide a simulation modelling framework to examine the behaviour of a serial make-to-stock (MTS) manufacturing system under the influence…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a simulation modelling framework to examine the behaviour of a serial make-to-stock (MTS) manufacturing system under the influence of various uncertainties. Further, the study analyses effect of propagation uncertainties from lower to upper stream of supply chain.

Design/methodology/approach

System dynamics modelling approach has been adopted for modelling and analysing the behaviour of a serial MTS manufacturing system under the influence of different uncertainties such as demand, supplier acquisition rate, raw material (RM) supply lead time, processing time and delay due to machine failure. The backup supply strategy has been proposed to mitigate the adverse effect of the RM supply uncertainty.

Findings

The effect of variations of various factors on the performance of a MTS manufacturing supply chain in measured through various performance measures like work-in-progress (WIP) inventory, backlog and RM shortage at both manufacturer’s and supplier’s end. The benefit of adopting backup supply strategy under RM supply uncertainty is demonstrated.

Research limitations/implications

This work is limited to analysis of a serial MTS manufacturing system dealing with a single product having two machines only. The study can be easily extended to a more complex system with multiple machines, lines and products.

Practical implications

A simple simulation framework has been proposed to analyse the effect of various uncertainties on the performance of a MTS manufacturing system. The managers can simulate complex systems using simulation approaches to generate if-then scenarios to gain insight into practical problems and formulate strategies to mitigate adverse effect of uncertainties at various level of supply chain.

Originality/value

The study analyses behaviour of MTS manufacturing system under the effect of various uncertainties operating simultaneously in the system. A backup supplier strategy is proposed to improve the service level at the customer’s end through improving service level at the supplier’s end. Similarly, effective strategies can be tested with the proposed simple model to reduce the effect of uncertainty at different levels of the supply chain.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 22 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 August 2009

Jiaxiang Hu, Amy Z. Zeng and Lindu Zhao

The purpose of this paper is to study the managing of emergencies pertinent to public health which is critical to the well‐being of a society; as such, the management…

1890

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study the managing of emergencies pertinent to public health which is critical to the well‐being of a society; as such, the management mechanisms employed should be of great interest and significance for research.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper first relies on extensive literature to describe the mechanism used in the USA from three aspects – organizational structure, management system, and logistics network. For the purpose of comparison, the Chinese version of the mechanism is presented from the same three aspects. The two management systems are then compared both qualitatively and quantitatively.

Findings

Deficient areas in Chinese public‐health management mechanism as well as challenging issues associated with supply chain design and coordination for emergency supplies in the context of large‐scale public health emergencies with low frequency but catastrophic impacts are found. Specifically, the following three important research problems are revealed from the comparative study: how to establish an efficient organizational structure that incorporates all the relevant entities in public‐health emergency management? How to establish an information system for emergency management that integrates disease surveillance, control, and prevention? How to design an efficient and cost‐effective logistics network to ensure prompt and sufficient delivery of emergency supplies?

Originality/value

To date, this research has been the first of its kind that compares two countries' emergency management systems in the context of public health management.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 109 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 June 2016

Rehab Ali and Ahmed Deif

– The purpose of this paper is to present a dynamic model to measure the degree of system’s leanness under dynamic demand conditions using a novel integrated metric.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present a dynamic model to measure the degree of system’s leanness under dynamic demand conditions using a novel integrated metric.

Design/methodology/approach

The multi-stage production system model is based on a system dynamics approach. The leanness level is measured using a new developed integrated metric that combines efficiency, WIP performance as well as service level. The analysis includes design of experiment technique at the initial analysis to examine the most significant parameters impacting the leanness score and then followed by examining different dynamic demand scenarios. Two scenarios were examined: one focussed low demand variation with various means (testing the impact of demand volumes) while the second focussed on high demand variation with constant means (testing the impact of demand variability).

Findings

Results using the data from a real case study indicated that given the model parameters, demand rate has the highest impact on leanness score dynamics. The next phase of the analysis thus focussed on investigating the effect of demand dynamics on the leanness score. The analysis highlighted the different effects of demand variability and volumes on the leanness score and its different components leading to various demand and production management recommendations in this dynamic environment.

Research limitations/implications

The presented lean management policies and recommendations are verified within the scope of similar systems to the considered company in terms of manufacturing settings and demand environment. Further research will be carried to extend the dynamic model to other dynamic manufacturing and service settings.

Practical implications

The developed metric can be used not only to assess the leanness level of the systems which is very critical to lean practitioners but also can be used to track lean implementation progress. In addition, the presented analysis outlined various demand management as well as lean implementation policies that can improve the system leanness level and overall performance.

Originality/value

The presented research develops a novel integrated metric and adds to the few literature on dynamic analysis of lean systems. Furthermore, the conducted analysis revealed some new aspects in understanding the relation between demand (variability and volume) and the leanness level of the systems. This will aid lean practitioners to set better demand and production management policies in today’s dynamic environment as well as take better decisions concerning lean technology investments.

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 27 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 August 2018

David E. Alexander

The purpose of this paper is to offer a critical examination of the aftermath of the L’Aquila earthquake of 6 April 2009. It considers the elements of the recovery process…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to offer a critical examination of the aftermath of the L’Aquila earthquake of 6 April 2009. It considers the elements of the recovery process that are unique or exceptional and endeavours to explain them.

Design/methodology/approach

The analysis is based on a survey and synthesis of the abundant literature on the disaster, coupled with observations from the author’s many visits to L’Aquila and personal involvement in the debates on the questions raised during the aftermath.

Findings

Several aspects of the disaster are unique. These include the use of large, well-appointed buildings as temporary accommodation and the efforts to use legal processes to obtain justice for alleged mismanagement of both the early emergency situation and faults in the recovery process.

Research limitations/implications

Politics, history, economics and geography have conspired to make the L’Aquila disaster and its aftermath a multi-layered event that poses considerable challenges of interpretation.

Practical implications

The L’Aquila case teaches first that moderate seismic events can entail a long and difficult process of recovery if the initial vulnerability is high. Second, for processes of recovery to be rational, they need to be safeguarded against the effects of political expediency and bureaucratic delay.

Social implications

Many survivors of the L’Aquila disaster have been hostages to fortune, victims as much of broader political and socio-economic forces than of the earthquake itself.

Originality/value

Although there are now many published analyses of the L’Aquila disaster, as the better part of a decade has elapsed since the event, there is value in taking stock and making a critical assessment of developments. The context of this disaster is dynamic and extraordinarily sophisticated, and it provides the key to interpretation of developments that otherwise would probably seem illogical.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 28 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 July 2005

Diane Newton and Allan Ellis

This case study identifies factors influencing the implementation of e‐learning within the Australian Army training context.

4332

Abstract

Purpose

This case study identifies factors influencing the implementation of e‐learning within the Australian Army training context.

Design/methodology/approach

A grounded theory approach was used to gain an understanding of the concerns of stakeholders involved in e‐learning implementation. This research included interviews with Army managers, course developers, instructional designers and instructors.

Findings

The main factors that were important for respondents involved in e‐learning management, design, development and delivery could be identified. This case study demonstrates the importance of maintaining focus on organisational priorities and learning goals while meeting the demands of change pressures.

Research limitations/implications

This is an initial study to gain an overview of the main issues. More research will be required to understand the Army's e‐learning context and to confirm these findings. Further research will include other stakeholders, including trainees' perspectives and extend to other Army sites.

Practical implications

For effective implementation there needs to be a process of continual adaptation and alignment of e‐learning to reflect changing demands while meeting the priorities of the organisational culture and learners' needs.

Originality/value

This paper analyses the first independent external research into e‐learning in the Australian Army. Although this is a specialised context for e‐learning, the issues raised in this case study will inform research into other workplace e‐learning projects.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 17 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

Keywords

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