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Article

Dan Zhang, Ching-Hsin Wang, Dengpan Zheng and Xianyun Yu

The purpose of this paper is to extend prior supply chain research by describing the process of innovation knowledge increase in supply chain network. More specifically…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to extend prior supply chain research by describing the process of innovation knowledge increase in supply chain network. More specifically, this study investigates the role of network density, and views the knowledge increase as the process of knowledge diffusion and knowledge innovation.

Design/methodology/approach

A multi-agent model, which demonstrates the process of knowledge increase in supply chain network, was established, and simulated by using NetLogo simulation platform.

Findings

The results indicate that the network density will promote the knowledge increase of the supply chain when it is high or low. In the meantime, these results show that the inhibition of knowledge diffusion and knowledge innovation will appear when network density is moderate.

Originality/value

Although previous research has identified the importance of knowledge increase in promoting sustainable development of supply chain, far less attention was given to the study of the effect of network structure on the knowledge increase in supply chain. This study thus fulfills the research gap by providing a description of the process of knowledge increase with the consideration of network density. The conclusion is of great significance for the choice of network density for sustainable development of supply chain.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 118 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

Keywords

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Article

Antony Lovell, Richard Saw and Jennifer Stimson

Aims to identify the importance of segmentation both as part of the network design process and as an operational tool for correctly allocating products to appropriate…

Abstract

Purpose

Aims to identify the importance of segmentation both as part of the network design process and as an operational tool for correctly allocating products to appropriate supply chains.

Design/methodology/approach

The allocation is based upon a wide range of possible factors relating to the characteristics of the product, to the market, to the source and to the geographic/commercial context. The application of this framework is presented in a case study of a global electronics company, where large costs savings were achieved through the segmentation of supply chains.

Findings

A logical basis for segmentation is derived and an operational framework developed, which highlights the importance of product value density (PVD), throughput volume and product availability.

Originality/value

Demonstrates the paramount importance of throughput, demand variability/service factor and PVD as the key drivers in the segmentation process.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

Keywords

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Article

Mina Mikhail, Mohammed El-Beheiry and Nahid Afia

The purpose of this paper is to develop a decision tool that enables supply chain (SC) architects to design resilient SC networks (SCNs). Two resilience design…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop a decision tool that enables supply chain (SC) architects to design resilient SC networks (SCNs). Two resilience design determinants are considered: SC density and node criticality. The effect of considering these determinants on network structures is highlighted based on the ability to resist disruptions and how SC performance is affected.

Design/methodology/approach

A mixed-integer non-linear programming model is proposed as a proactive strategy to develop resilient structures; design determinants are formulated and considered as constraints. An upper limit is set for each determinant, and resistance capacity and performance of the developed structures are evaluated. These upper limits are then changed until SC performance stabilizes in case of no disruption.

Findings

Resilient SCN structures are achieved at relatively low design determinants levels on the expense of profit and without experiencing shortage in case of no disruption. This reduction in profit can be minimized on setting counter values for the two determinants; relatively higher SC density with lower node criticality or vice versa. At very low SC density levels, the design model will reduce the number of open facilities largely leading to only one facility open at each echelon; therefore, shortage occurs and vulnerability to disruption increases. On the other hand, at high determinants levels, SC vulnerability also increases as a result of having more geographically clustered structures with higher inbound and outbound flows for each facility.

Originality/value

In this paper, a novel proactive decision tool is adopted to design resilient SCNs. Previous literature used metrics for SC density and node criticality to assess resilience; in this research, determinants are incorporated directly as constraints in the design model. Results give insight to SC architects on how to set determinant values to reach resilient structures with minimum performance loss in case of no disruption.

Details

Journal of Modelling in Management, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5664

Keywords

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Article

Phil Greening and Christine Rutherford

The purpose of this paper is to develop a conceptual framework for the analysis of supply network disruptions and present a number of propositions to define a future…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop a conceptual framework for the analysis of supply network disruptions and present a number of propositions to define a future research agenda. In doing so, it draws on a review of the literature regarding supply chain disruptions; relationship formation and evolution; and network formation and evolution.

Design/methodology/approach

The literature review combined traditional contextual analysis with citation analysis and co‐citation, assuming a multi‐level, multi‐theoretical perspective.

Findings

The findings highlight a paucity of empirical research regarding supply chain disruptions assuming a network perspective, highlighting the dynamic nature of networks and emphasising the difference between supply chain disturbance and disruption.

Research limitations/implications

The paper stops short of testing specific hypotheses, providing a conceptual framework and a series of propositions from which testable hypotheses can be developed. The necessity of assuming a dynamic, multi‐level, multi‐theoretical perspective highlights the difficulties of empirical research in this area. However, the significance of understanding the network context of disruption and its connection to the securing of appropriate responses and ultimately reasonable mitigation is unavoidable.

Practical implications

The ability to understand the implications of network structure and network relational dynamics in the context of disruption will enable managers to respond appropriately to disruptive supply chain events. This capability will assume increasing importance in the vulnerable and sensitive global economy.

Originality value

The paper's specific consideration of disruption (as opposed to disturbance), and the necessitated speed of response leads to the development of several disruption‐specific propositions and the development of a new research agenda.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

Keywords

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Article

Santanu Mandal

– The purpose of this paper is to report a comprehensive review of supply chain resilience and identify several research issues.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report a comprehensive review of supply chain resilience and identify several research issues.

Design/methodology/approach

The articles which have been published in international journals in the period 1980-2012 were collected by using databases like ISI Web of Knowledge, ScienceDirect and EBSCO. The articles were scrutinized based on relevance to context and value addition. The articles contributing significantly in the domain of supply chain resilience were selected for final review and various issues were identified.

Findings

The paper argues that though several conceptual to few empirical works been done on supply chain resilience in recent years, there is large scope for research to address the issues in risk management, supply chain design, sourcing strategies, green practices, sustainable competitive advantage, supply chain security, supply chain performance and supply chain resilience.

Research limitations/implications

The insights deduced in the paper are primarily based on 45 articles selected for critical review and analysis in the domain of supply chain resilience and hence should be interpreted only as key concerns in the area.

Originality/value

The paper reports an evaluation of 45 key articles reported in the domain of supply chain resilience and indicates the research opportunities in the area.

Details

International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-5908

Keywords

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Article

Geoffrey T. Stewart, Ramesh Kolluru and Mark Smith

As noted in the Department of Homeland Security's National Response Framework, disasters are inherently local and ultimately the responsibility of the lowest…

Abstract

Purpose

As noted in the Department of Homeland Security's National Response Framework, disasters are inherently local and ultimately the responsibility of the lowest jurisdictional level present within the impacted area. Given these parameters, this paper aims to sharpen the concept of national resilience by recommending a framework which positions community resilience as an integral variable in understanding the ability of impacted areas to effectively manage the consequences of disasters. Conceptualized as a dependent variable, community resilience is influenced by the relationships government (public) agencies develop with private sector partners and the resilience of relevant supply chains and critical infrastructures/key resources which exist in their communities.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors augment a topical literature review of academic and practitioner journals by synthesizing existing findings into a holistic framework of community resilience.

Findings

This paper argues that interdependent systems like social and economic networks will ultimately influence the ability of communities to adapt and respond to the consequences of disasters. In addressing the resilience of these systems, all levels of government must recognize and embrace the public‐private interfaces that can improve their ability to manage the response and recovery phases of disaster management. While 85 percent of critical infrastructure is owned by the private sector, 100 percent of it exists within communities and impacts the ability of the nation to recover from disasters. Resilience calls upon active management and relies upon assessment and a willingness to take action in the face of adversity.

Originality/value

Resilience is discussed within economics, behavioral sciences, supply chain management and critical infrastructure protection. This paper integrates these research streams to develop a framework for shaping national resilience.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 39 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

Keywords

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Article

Mohsen Varsei, Claudine Soosay, Behnam Fahimnia and Joseph Sarkis

This paper aims to provide a framework which can assist focal companies in the development of sustainable supply chains. Sustainable development from an industrial…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide a framework which can assist focal companies in the development of sustainable supply chains. Sustainable development from an industrial perspective has extended beyond organisational boundaries to incorporate a supply chain approach.

Design/methodology/approach

The literature related to sustainable supply chain management is reviewed by incorporating concepts from four organisational theories, including the resource-based, institutional, stakeholder and social network perspectives, to illustrate key drivers and enablers of sustainability initiatives in the supply chain. A conceptual multidimensional framework is then developed that can be used for the initial assessment of supply chain sustainability.

Findings

Development and assessment of sustainability in supply chains are being increasingly incorporated as part of supply chain management today. This paper presents a multidimensional framework which can serve as a tool for research scholars and supply chain practitioners in identifying and assessing various economic, environmental and social performance indicators.

Research limitations/implications

The framework and approach presented are conceptual, and require additional and broader validation. Additional theories, at differing levels, such as individual behaviour theory, should be utilised to further enhance and evaluate the framework. Developing and integrating analytical models for prescriptive and practical supply chain solutions can enhance the applicability of the framework.

Practical implications

The framework adopts a multidimensional approach to assessing and designing sustainable supply chains, as it not only incorporates economic and environmental dimensions but also provides a practical approach to quantifying and embedding the social dimension into decision-making. The framework helps industry practitioners in initial exploration of trade-offs among economic, environmental and social performance of supply chains, which, in turn, could assist them in creating a business case for sustainability.

Originality/value

The paper is one of few studies that incorporates some of the key aspects of all three dimensions of sustainability in a single overarching framework for supply chains and offers significant theoretical contribution and implications for sustainable supply chain management.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

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Article

Robert Handfield, Hang Sun and Lori Rothenberg

With the growth of unstructured data, opportunities to generate insights into supply chain risks in low cost countries (LCCs) are emerging. Sourcing risk has primarily…

Abstract

Purpose

With the growth of unstructured data, opportunities to generate insights into supply chain risks in low cost countries (LCCs) are emerging. Sourcing risk has primarily focused on short-term mitigation. This paper aims to offer an approach that uses newsfeed data to assess regional supply base risk in LCC’s for the apparel sector, which managers can use to plan for future risk on a long-term planning horizon.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper demonstrates that the bulk of supplier risk assessments focus on short-term responses to disruptions in developed countries, revealing a gap in assessments of long-term risks for supply base expansion in LCCs. This paper develops an approach for predicting and planning for long-term supply base risk in LCC’s to address this shortfall. A machine-based learning algorithm is developed that uses the analysis of competing hypotheses heuristic to convert data from multiple news feeds into numerical risk scores and visual maps of supply chain risk. This paper demonstrates the approach by converting large amounts of unstructured data into two measures, risk impact and risk probability, leading to visualization of country-level supply base risks for a global apparel company.

Findings

This paper produced probability and impact scores for 23 distinct supply base risks across 10 countries in the apparel sector. The results suggest that the most significant long-term risks of supply disruption for apparel in LCC’s are human resource regulatory risks, workplace issues, inflation costs, safety violations and social welfare violations. The results suggest that apparel brands seeking suppliers in the regions of Cambodia, India, Bangladesh, Brazil and Vietnam should be aware of the significant risks in these regions that may require mitigative action.

Originality/value

This approach establishes a novel approach for objectively projecting future global sourcing risk, and yields visually mapped outcomes that can be applied in forecasting and planning for future risks when considering sourcing locations in LCC’s.

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Article

Emilia Vann Yaroson, Liz Breen, Jiachen Hou and Julie Sowter

The purpose of this study was to advance the knowledge of pharmaceutical supply chain (PSC) resilience using complex adaptive system theory (CAS).

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to advance the knowledge of pharmaceutical supply chain (PSC) resilience using complex adaptive system theory (CAS).

Design/methodology/approach

An exploratory research design, which adopted a qualitative approach was used to achieve the study’s research objective. Qualitative data were gathered through 23 semi-structured interviews with key supply chain actors across the PSC in the UK.

Findings

The findings demonstrate that CAS, as a theory, provides a systemic approach to understanding PSC resilience by taking into consideration the various elements (environment, PSC characteristics, vulnerabilities and resilience strategies) that make up the entire system. It also provides explanations for key findings, such as the impact of power, conflict and complexity in the PSC, which are influenced by the interactions between supply chain actors and as such increase its susceptibility to the negative impact of disruption. Furthermore, the antecedents for building resilience strategies were the outcome of the decision-making process referred to as co-evolution from a CAS perspective.

Originality/value

Based on the data collected, the study was able to reflect on the relationships, interactions and interfaces between actors in the PSC using the CAS theory, which supports the proposition that resilience strategies can be adopted by supply chain actors to enhance this service supply chain. This is a novel empirical study of resilience across multiple levels of the PSC and as such adds valuable new knowledge about the phenomenon and the use of CAS theory as a vehicle for exploration and knowledge construction in other supply chains.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 26 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

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Article

David Gligor, Albert Tan and Thi Nha Trang Nguyen

The purpose of this paper is to identify the obstacles that impede cold chain implementation in developing countries.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify the obstacles that impede cold chain implementation in developing countries.

Design/methodology/approach

A grounded theory methodology was employed to execute this research. Eight semi-structured, in-depth interviews were conducted with senior managers in Vietnam. In addition, consistent with grounded theory guidelines, the authors utilized archival data to facilitate theory development.

Findings

The results of the analysis revealed a total of ten key obstacles: deficient professional skills, lack of quality and safety-control measures, high concentration of intermediaries, poor infrastructure, lack of information systems, high cost of installation and operation, inadequate education and training at farmer level, deficiency of standardization, lack of government support for local businesses and social norms.

Originality/value

Although many authors have recognized the enormity of food wastage and limited employment of cold chain in developing countries compared to developed countries, few efforts have been made to explore the reasons for the limited use of cold chains in developing countries. There are several noteworthy theoretical and managerial contributions that emerged from addressing this gap.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 29 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

Keywords

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