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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2004

Ian A. Combe and Gordon E. Greenley

Different forms of strategic flexibility allow for reactive adaptation to different changing environments and the proactive driving of change. It is therefore becoming…

Abstract

Different forms of strategic flexibility allow for reactive adaptation to different changing environments and the proactive driving of change. It is therefore becoming increasingly important for decision makers to not only possess marketing capabilities, but also the capabilities for strategic flexibility in its various forms. However, our knowledge of the relationships between decision makers' different ways of thinking and their capabilities for strategic flexibility is limited. This limitation is constraining research and understanding. In this article we develop a theoretical cognitive content framework that postulates relationships between different ways of thinking about strategy and different information‐processing demands. We then outline how the contrasting beliefs of decision makers may influence their capabilities to generate different hybrid forms of strategic flexibility at the cognitive level. Theoretically, the framework is embedded in resource‐based theory, personal construct theory and schema theory. The implications for research and theory are discussed.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 38 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Book part
Publication date: 4 August 2015

Michael Abebe and David

Despite the extensive research on the determinants and consequences of firm growth, research focusing on how the actual process unfolds is still evolving. An important…

Abstract

Despite the extensive research on the determinants and consequences of firm growth, research focusing on how the actual process unfolds is still evolving. An important part of firm growth process research is entrepreneurial cognition. The purpose of this chapter is to explore the relationship between entrepreneurial cognition and firm growth intentions. Specifically, we propose a theoretical model of entrepreneurial cognitive interpretation and categorization of market information as it relates to firm growth intentions. Drawing from the strategic cognition literature in general and strategic issue interpretation literature in particular, we propose that entrepreneurs’ interpretation of market information as opportunity or threat, gain or loss, and controllable or uncontrollable influences their firm growth intentions. Furthermore, our theoretical model discusses the condition under which favorable interpretation of market information leads to higher growth intentions by incorporating insights from the Entrepreneurial Orientation (EO) construct. This chapter extends our understanding of firm growth processes by highlighting the important role cognitive interpretation and categorization play in facilitating or hindering entrepreneurial firm growth.

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Entrepreneurial Growth: Individual, Firm, and Region
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-047-0

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Article
Publication date: 8 February 2016

Claudia Neumüller, Rainer Lasch and Florian Kellner

The purpose of this paper is to propose a comprehensive methodology and a problem-specific model for the configuration of the optimal strategic supplier portfolio in terms…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to propose a comprehensive methodology and a problem-specific model for the configuration of the optimal strategic supplier portfolio in terms of traditional, performance-related objectives and sustainability targets.

Design/methodology/approach

To bridge the research gap, i.e., to align strategic supplier portfolio selection with corporate sustainability targets, a hybrid model of the analytic network process (ANP) and goal programming (GP) is developed. To validate the model, a case example is presented and managerial feedback is collected.

Findings

By enabling the integration of sustainability targets into strategic supplier portfolio configuration, the hybrid ANP-GP model contributes to research in the area of sustainable supply chain management. Results indicate that simplifying the model by omitting one or more details may lead to unfortunate actions.

Research limitations/implications

The model has been applied using a case example in the automotive industry. To strengthen the findings, it should be examined under other terms as well.

Practical implications

Integrating economic, environmental, and social targets into strategic supplier portfolio configuration reduces supply risks and promotes the achievement of the sustainability goals of the purchasing company.

Social implications

Strategic supplier selection counts among the decisions that have an impact on the environment and society for several years. Configuring economically rational, environmentally friendly, and socially responsible supplier bases supports worldwide efforts towards sustainable development.

Originality/value

Although sustainable supplier selection has gained importance in recent years, this is the first time that a comprehensive model for the determination of the optimal strategic supplier portfolio in terms of performance-related objectives and sustainability targets has been proposed.

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Article
Publication date: 15 August 2016

Yi Yang, V.K. Narayanan, Yamuna Baburaj and Srinivasan Swaminathan

This paper aims to examine the relationship between the characteristics of strategic decision-making team’s mental model and its performance. The authors propose that the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the relationship between the characteristics of strategic decision-making team’s mental model and its performance. The authors propose that the relationship between mental models and performance is two-way, rather than one-way. Thus, performance feedback should, in turn, influence strategic behavior and future performance by either triggering or hindering the learning process.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conduct the research in the setting of a simulation experiment. A longitudinal data set was collected from 36 teams functioning as strategic decision makers over three periods.

Findings

This study provides support for the positive impacts of both the complexity and centrality of a team’s mental model on its performance. The authors also find that positive performance feedback reduces changes in complexity and centrality of team mental models due to cognitive inertia.

Originality/value

The study contributes to the literature by investigating the specific mechanisms that underlie mental model evolution. Different from the existing studies on team mental models that mainly focus on similarity of these shared cognitive structures, this study examines another two characteristics of team mental model, complexity and centrality, that are more relevant to the strategic decision-making process but has not been extensively studied in the team literature. In addition, this study reveals that performance feedback has different effects on team mental models depending on the referents – past performance or social comparison – which advances the understanding of the learning effects of performance feedback.

Details

Management Research Review, vol. 39 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8269

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Article
Publication date: 2 March 2012

Jeffrey G. Woods

The purpose of this paper is to develop a conceptual model that uses dialectical inquiry (DI) to create cognitive conflict in strategic decision‐makers for the purpose of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop a conceptual model that uses dialectical inquiry (DI) to create cognitive conflict in strategic decision‐makers for the purpose of improving strategic decisions. Activation of the dialectical learning process using DI requires strategic decision‐makers to integrate conflicting information causing cognitive conflict. Cognitive conflict is the catalyst that stimulates the creation of new knowledge in strategic decision‐makers resulting in improved organizational performance.

Design/methodology/approach

A conceptual model is developed that explicitly links DI to the dialectical learning process of strategic decision‐makers. This model extends previous research on DI by identifying cognitive conflict as the critical component that links DI as a learning method to the process of dialectical learning in strategic decision‐making.

Findings

The major finding of the model of dialectical learning is that the model is an important resource that can be applied to create cognitive conflict in strategic decision‐makers for the purpose of expanding the strategic options of organizations.

Research limitations/implications

Empirical research on DI that focuses on the role of cognitive conflict in the dialectical learning process is lacking. It is hoped that this conceptual paper will stimulate further interest on the topic and a greater appreciation of this method of learning. Strategic decision‐makers must consider alternative ways of generating new knowledge that is crucial for organizational performance.

Practical implications

It is important that the benefits of creating cognitive conflict in the dialectical learning process are understood by strategic decision‐makers. Training for participants in a DI learning intervention is essential to help minimize any dysfunctional behaviors that could result from affective conflict.

Originality/value

This conceptual model identifies the importance of cognitive conflict in the dialectical learning process of strategic decision‐makers and the critical role of cognitive conflict rather than affective conflict in the use of this learning method.

Details

The Learning Organization, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-6474

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Article
Publication date: 14 July 2021

Esra Saleh Al Dhaen

Strategic decision importance has rarely been investigated as a decision-specific characteristic in the strategic decision-making process (SDMP) literature taking into…

Abstract

Purpose

Strategic decision importance has rarely been investigated as a decision-specific characteristic in the strategic decision-making process (SDMP) literature taking into consideration information management while taking important strategic decisions. Here, the ability of decision importance to predict decision effectiveness as an outcome of SDMPs in higher education institutions (HEIs) is examined in the context of Bahrain.

Design/methodology/approach

A conceptual model is developed relating decision importance to decision effectiveness indirectly via the SDMP characteristics intuition, rationality and decentralization. Data from a cross-sectional questionnaire completed by leaders of HEIs and academics involved in strategic decision-making in Bahrain are used to test the model and hypotheses via correlation analysis. The paper also considers a literature review of the use of information management while taking a strategic decision.

Findings

Decision importance is shown to positively influence decision effectiveness in Bahraini HEIs mediated by rationality and by decentralization in decision-making, although negative effects of decentralization are also demonstrated. However, decision importance does not influence decision effectiveness mediated by intuition.

Research limitations/implications

Due to the small sample size, the results cannot be generalized to contexts beyond HEIs in Bahrain. Additional SDMP characteristics of significance in the context of HEIs could be future investigated, for instance, political behaviour and lateral communication, are not included in the model. Future research exploring the latter two aspects could provide deeper insight into the findings.

Practical implications

The findings of this paper could be considered by HEIs senior management and members of the governing body while strategic decision-making, which could be at different levels, including strategic planning or assessing a strategic decision in terms of effectiveness. This paper will also provide insight one the use of information while considering strategic decision-making.

Social implications

A model leading for effective strategic decision-making could be used by leaders of HEIs and regulators including licensing bodies and QA agencies to set standards for HEIs for sustainable performance and quality education in line with United Nations Sustainable Development Goals and Initiative. Strategic decision-making will have an impact on the overall performance of HEIs and serve all relevant stakeholder’s including parents, students, employers and industry.

Originality/value

Little research conducted in relation to strategic decision-making in the Gulf Cooperation Council therefore, this research will add original findings and the outcome of this study will lead to future research related to SDMP and the use of information management in the overall strategic decision-making.

Details

The Bottom Line, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0888-045X

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2000

L.F. ALARCÓN and A. BASTIAS

A computer environment to support the strategic decision‐making process in construction firms is presented. The system implements modelling concepts originally developed…

Abstract

A computer environment to support the strategic decision‐making process in construction firms is presented. The system implements modelling concepts originally developed to evaluate project execution strategies, extending and generalizing the modelling methodology to a broader range of strategic decisions. An application to a construction firm's strategic planning is used in this paper to illustrate the modelling process. The computer system is designed to help the users in building a conceptual model for the decision problem, this model is a simplified structure of the variables and interactions that influence the decisions being analysed, including internal as well as external factors. An analytical model is then designed to predict the impact of these strategies, integrating expert knowledge and assessments of the strategic planning team into a mathematical model. The mathematical component uses concepts of cross‐impact analysis and probabilistic inference to capture uncertainties and interactions among project variables. The system provides multiple analysis capabilities, including sensitivity analysis, selected outcome prediction, isolated or combined effect of strategies and changes in performance due to changes in the external environment. The system allows management to test different combinations of long‐term strategies and predict expected sales, market share or other measures of performance.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Book part
Publication date: 25 July 2008

Claire E. Ashton-James and Neal M. Ashkanasy

Although there has been increasing interest in the role of affect in work settings, the impact of moods and emotions in strategic decision making remains largely…

Abstract

Although there has been increasing interest in the role of affect in work settings, the impact of moods and emotions in strategic decision making remains largely unexplored. In this essay, we address this shortcoming by proposing a conceptual model of strategic decision making that incorporates, at its core, the impact of affective states on cognitive processes that are integral to the decision outcome. The model is based on the principles of Affective Events Theory, which holds that environmental exigencies generate “affective events” that cause emotional reactions in organizational members which, in turn, determine members’ attitudes and behaviors. We extend this model to include the effect of the extra-organizational environment, and propose that emotions “infuse” those cognitive processes that are critical to the strategic decision making process. We conclude that strategic decision making in organizations is not always a controlled, deliberate, purely cognitive process, as it is often described. Rather, we contend that the moods and emotions that managers experience in response to positive and negative workplace events have a significant affect on strategic decision-making processes and ultimately, organizational-level outcomes. We discuss the implications of our model for theory, research, and practice.

Details

Emotions, Ethics and Decision-Making
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84663-941-8

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Article
Publication date: 14 January 2014

Tom Murphy and Will O'Brien

The paper aims to examine a strategic decision model and its potential value for assisting academic institutional leaders in addressing climate change by making better…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to examine a strategic decision model and its potential value for assisting academic institutional leaders in addressing climate change by making better informed sustainability investment decisions.

Design/methodology/approach

Although the vast majority of engagements have focused on IT project selection and prioritization, it will be demonstrated that there is direct applicability to capital investment decisions related to sustainability. Examples of the results are provided with instructions on how to implement a similar approach for organizations challenged with selection and prioritization of sustainability projects. Finally, the model is assessed critically in terms of challenges and lessons learned from client projects.

Findings

The strategic decision model has been found to provide a broader framework for decisions, i.e. both qualitative and quantitative. At the same time, the methodology used with the model engages more stakeholders in the process to help build consensus regarding investment and project decisions. As a portfolio-based model, relative value and risk can be viewed easily to enable focus on what the stakeholders believe to be key projects. This perspective and the functionality of the application enable action to be taken by the decision maker to possibly reduce project risk and/or increase potential value of specific projects.

Research limitations/implications

It was determined that additional research, data collection and application development would be necessary if the model were to be used for benchmarking for sustainability planning investment decisions.

Practical implications

The paper proposes that colleges and universities consider the use of the portfolio decision model and, where appropriate, implement the model as part of their sustainability program. The anticipated benefits of this action would include: greater involvement of key stakeholders in support of required organizational change, improvement in the quality of investment decisions, increased success of sustainability projects and data which will enable future benchmarking.

Originality/value

Given this emergent leading role of universities in championing sustainability efforts, the purpose of this paper is to provide college and university leaders a tool to address the challenges related to investment decisions targeted at sustainability projects, such as environmental footprint reduction in support of achieving sustainability for their respective institutions.

Details

Management Research Review, vol. 37 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8269

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2005

Borut Rusjan

Proposes a model of strategic planning as a basis to overcome the identified shortcomings in the past empirical research. The basic assumption of the proposed model is…

Abstract

Purpose

Proposes a model of strategic planning as a basis to overcome the identified shortcomings in the past empirical research. The basic assumption of the proposed model is that an appropriate strategic analysis is necessary in order to ensure appropriate strategic decisions.

Design/methodology/approach

Shortcomings related to empirical research in the past were identified with the aim of discussing some possible reasons why the concept of manufacturing strategy had not been more widely adopted in practice and of developing the model of strategic planning. Based on the proposed model and relating to previous research, an empirical study of two relationships has been performed: first, between business strategic competence of an enterprise and business performance, and second, between business strategic competence and manufacturing strategic decision areas.

Findings

The goals of analysis in the process of strategic planning have been explained. Empirical findings about a positive relationship between business performance and business strategic competence confirmed the results of previous research. Some empirically significant relationships between strategic decision areas and manufacturing competitive priorities results were identified.

Practical implications

In order to guarantee effective decision making, the role of the analysis in the process of planning has to be understood. This phase of the planning process is not getting enough attention from practitioners. This results in decision making for which quick jumping to solution‐seeking is characteristic, without appropriate determination of problems beforehand.

Originality/value

The paper emphasises the importance of strategic analysis and problem identification to appropriate strategic decision making. This holds true not only of practical strategic decision making inside specific companies, but also of design and implementation of empirical research.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 25 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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