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Article

Rabindra Kumar Pradhan, Lalatendu Kesari Jena and Sanjay Kumar Singh

The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between organisational learning and adaptive performance. Furthermore, the study investigates the moderating role…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between organisational learning and adaptive performance. Furthermore, the study investigates the moderating role of emotional intelligence in the perspective of organisational learning for addressing adaptive performance of executives employed in manufacturing organisations.

Design/methodology/approach

The participants were selected through purposive sampling. The study has used established scales on organisational learning, emotional intelligence and adaptive performance to collect data from the respondents. Data were analysed through structural equation modelling using linear structural model (LISREL 8.72). Moderated regression analysis was carried out through a series of hierarchical models to test the hypotheses. The authors have followed the interaction graphs recommended by Aiken and West (1991) to check the moderating effect of emotional intelligence.

Findings

The result of the study indicates a significant relationship between organisational learning and adaptive performance. The significant moderation effect was observed in the interaction graph, wherein it was found that the relationship between organisational learning and adaptive performance was stronger among the executives with high levels of emotional intelligence and weaker for those having low levels of emotional intelligence.

Originality/value

The present study gains significance through highlighting the role of emotional intelligence in the perspective of organisational learning and, thus, offers insights to practitioners for addressing adaptive performance of employees.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 29 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

Keywords

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Article

Valter Cantino, Alain Devalle, Damiano Cortese, Francesca Ricciardi and Mariangela Longo

The purpose of this paper is to develop an original six-phase model describing entrepreneurial learning in the transition of place-based enterprises toward a sustainable…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop an original six-phase model describing entrepreneurial learning in the transition of place-based enterprises toward a sustainable exploitation of natural common resources (commons).

Design/methodology/approach

The six-phase model proposed by this study explains the learning processes involving place-based enterprises through two important existing theories: adaptive co-management and Lachmann’s evolutionary, embedded theory of entrepreneurship. The proposed model integrates these two theories on the basis of a longitudinal case study on the fishing enterprises in an Italian marine protected area (MPA).

Findings

In the case study, the success factors identified by the adaptive co-management literature proved important in enabling an embedded entrepreneurial learning process consistent with Lachmann’s view. The case analysis allowed the authors to cluster these learning processes around six phases. Further, even if traditional fishing is not knowledge-intensive, this case shows the transition to a sustainable business model required intense efforts of educated institutional work and scientific research. Interestingly, the key learning processes were enabled by the emergence of a larger, networked social entity (a network form of organization) including the community of fishermen, the MPA management and a network of scientists studying the marine area ecosystem.

Research limitations/implications

This study is explorative and relies on a single case study. Despite this limitation, it opens up new research paths in the fields of entrepreneurship, institutional work, network organizations and adaptive management of the commons.

Originality/value

This study is strongly interdisciplinary; it proposes an original model based on a theoretical view that is highly innovative for organization and management studies; and addresses a relevant but overlooked issue with important societal implications.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 23 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

Keywords

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Article

Julie Villesseche, Olivier Le Bohec, Christophe Quaireau, Jeremie Nogues, Anne-Laure Besnard, Sandrine Oriez, Fanny De La Haye, Yvonnick Noel and Karine Lavandier

E-learning is part of instructional design and has opened a whole world of new possibilities in terms of learning and teaching. The purpose of this paper is to develop an…

Abstract

Purpose

E-learning is part of instructional design and has opened a whole world of new possibilities in terms of learning and teaching. The purpose of this paper is to develop an adaptive e-learning platform that enhances skills from primary school to university learners. Two purposes converge here: a pedagogical one – offering new possibilities, especially in terms of teaching scenarios (blended learning); and a research one – confirming the effectiveness of an adaptive e-learning tool in the case of individualized cross-disciplinary competences, such as comprehension of implicit information in written texts (French).

Design/methodology/approach

The case study presented here concerns primary-school learners using the Implicit module of TACIT adaptive e-learning tool over the 2016-2017 academic year.

Findings

This paper gives a first positive answer to the effectiveness of such a tool in this specific context. This pedagogical effectiveness is more pronounced for low-level pupils, especially for girls and for older pupils (CM1/CM2, respectively, fourth/fifth grade).

Originality/value

In this case study, the module comes from an existing platform, created by the TACIT research group. The adaptive environment was created by using the Item Response Theory models and, more precisely, the Rasch model.

Details

Interactive Technology and Smart Education, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-5659

Keywords

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Article

Kyoungshin Kim

This study aims to introduce adaptive performance as an organizational performance dimension and examine the possible dynamics between the dimensions of a learning

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to introduce adaptive performance as an organizational performance dimension and examine the possible dynamics between the dimensions of a learning organization and adaptive performance.

Design/methodology/approach

This study used a survey and applied factor analysis and structural equation modeling analysis.

Findings

The results supported adaptive performance as an organizational performance dimension. Also, the findings of this study empirically proved that perceived knowledge and adaptive performance mediate the positive relationship between a learning organization and perceived financial performance.

Research limitations/implications

In addition to the current Dimensions of a Learning Organization Questionnaire (DLOQ) studies, this study revealed that adaptive performance, one of the nonfinancial outcomes improved by learning, had a significant effect on financial performance. Also, this study provided evidence of the additional construct validity of the DLOQ, particularly its performance measures.

Practical implications

This study advises practitioners to take a close look at how learning and organization development activities improve organizational performance overall.

Originality/value

This study supported a claim that learning and organization development activities in organizations have a strong potential to induce variance in intangible performance.

Details

The Learning Organization, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-6474

Keywords

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Article

Valerie I. Sessa, Manuel London and Marlee Wanamaker

Extending a model of how teams learn, this paper aims to present a model of multiteam system (MTS) learning, comparing similarities and differences between how MTSs learn

Abstract

Purpose

Extending a model of how teams learn, this paper aims to present a model of multiteam system (MTS) learning, comparing similarities and differences between how MTSs learn and how component teams learn. The paper describes the value of adaptive, generative and transformative learning for increasing MTS development over time.

Design/methodology/approach

The model proposes that environmental demands trigger adaptive, generative and transformative MTS learning, which is further increased by the MTS’s readiness to learn. Learning can happen during performance episodes and during hiatus periods between performance episodes.

Findings

Learning triggers coupled with readiness to learn and the cycle and phase of MTS process influence the learning process (adaptive, generative or transformative), which in turn influences the learning outcomes.

Research/limitations implications

The study offers a number of research propositions with the idea that the model and propositions will stimulate research in this area.

Practical implications

This model allows MTS and component team leaders and facilitators to recognize that MTS learning is a process that is needed to help component teams work together and help the MTS as a whole perform in current and future situations, thereby improving MTS effectiveness.

Originality/value

Little attention has been given to the notion that MTSs learn and develop. This manuscript is the first to emphasize that MTSs learn and identify processes that can improve learning. Adaptive, generative and transformative processes describe how MTSs learn and produce changes in MTS structure and actions.

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 25 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

Keywords

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Article

Nish Sonwalkar

Despite the predictions and expectations that the online education will become a “killer app” and with major impact on education, the first generation of online education

Abstract

Purpose

Despite the predictions and expectations that the online education will become a “killer app” and with major impact on education, the first generation of online education has led to more disappointments than success stories. The current – one‐size‐fits‐all static approach is extremely ineffective and leads to increased effort on the part of faculty and instructors teaching online courses. This paper discusses adaptive learning as an alternative transfer of traditional structures from a geographically‐based to an online setting.

Design/methodology/approach

This article begins with an overview of the development of online education, and concludes that its initial promise has not been fulfilled because the innovations in technology have not been accompanied by any corresponding changes in the way classrooms are structured. It then proposes adaptive learning as a means by which, with the help of digital resources, learning can be adjusted to the needs and interests of individual students.

Findings

To improve current state‐of‐art and to increase effectiveness of the online education, systems that can adapt the content to match the learning preference of the individual learners, termed as the “adaptive learning systems,” are needed. Systems that will support adaptive learning in a university and college environment will facilitate a paradigm shift for instructors to “guide‐on‐the‐side” from “sage‐on‐the‐stage.”

Originality/value

This opinion piece argues the need for a massive restructuring of higher education, using a student‐centered model.

Details

On the Horizon, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

Keywords

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Article

Daniel Lockery and James F. Peters

The purpose of this paper is to report upon research into developing a biologically inspired target‐tracking system (TTS) capable of acquiring quality images of a known…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report upon research into developing a biologically inspired target‐tracking system (TTS) capable of acquiring quality images of a known target type for a robotic inspection application.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach used in the design of the TTS hearkens back to the work on adaptive learning by Oliver Selfridge and Chris J.C.H. Watkins and the work on the classification of objects by Zdzislaw Pawlak during the 1980s in an approximation space‐based form of feedback during learning. Also, during the 1980s, it was Ewa Orlowska who called attention to the importance of approximation spaces as a formal counterpart of perception. This insight by Orlowska has been important in working toward a new form of adaptive learning useful in controlling the behaviour of machines to accomplish system goals. The adaptive learning algorithms presented in this paper are strictly temporal difference methods, including Q‐learning, sarsa, and the actor‐critic method. Learning itself is considered episodic. During each episode, the equivalent of a Tinbergen‐like ethogram is constructed. Such an ethogram provides a basis for the construction of an approximation space at the end of each episode. The combination of episodic ethograms and approximation spaces provides an extremely effective means of feedback useful in guiding learning during the lifetime of a robotic system such as the TTS reported in this paper.

Findings

It was discovered that even though the adaptive learning methods were computationally more expensive than the classical algorithm implementations, they proved to be more effective in a number of cases, especially in noisy environments.

Originality/value

The novelty associated with this work is the introduction of an approach to adaptive adaptive learning carried out within the framework of ethology‐based approximation spaces to provide performance feedback during the learning process.

Details

International Journal of Intelligent Computing and Cybernetics, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-378X

Keywords

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Article

Amanda Louise Lizier

The purpose of this paper is to outline an empirical study of how professionals experience work and learning in complex adaptive organisations. The study uses a complex…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to outline an empirical study of how professionals experience work and learning in complex adaptive organisations. The study uses a complex adaptive systems approach, which forms the basis of a specifically developed conceptual framework for explaining professionals’ experiences of work and learning.

Design/methodology/approach

Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 14 professionals from a variety of organisations, industry sectors and occupations in Sydney, Australia. The transcripts were subjected to an adapted phenomenographic analysis, and an analysis using the complex adaptive organisations conceptual framework (CAOCF).

Findings

The findings indicated that professionals experienced learning mainly through work, where work was experienced as fluid and influenced by varying degrees of emergence, agency, complex social networks and adaptation. Further, the greater the degree of work fluidity, the greater the impetus towards learning through work, empirically indicating that the experience of learning in contemporary organisations is entwined with work.

Originality/value

This study used the concept of complex adaptive organisations as a conceptual framework, coupled with an adapted phenomenographic methodology, to investigate individual professionals’ experiences of work and learning. The adoption of the concept of complex adaptive organisations provided a rigorous way to adopt a complexity approach. In particular, the concept of emergence provides insights into how organisational complexity influences work and, subsequently, learning and adaptation.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 29 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

Keywords

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Article

Valerie I. Sessa, Manuel London, Christopher Pingor, Beyza Gullu and Juhi Patel

The aim of this study is to analyze a framework of team learning that includes three learning processes (adaptive, generative, and transformative), factors that stimulate…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this study is to analyze a framework of team learning that includes three learning processes (adaptive, generative, and transformative), factors that stimulate these processes, and consequences of them. The variables provided a field study of the model.

Design/methodology/approach

In the field study, 69 project teams of 3 to 11 students and their instructors responded to surveys.

Findings

Positive learning stimuli were related to adaptive and generative learning processes, while negative stimuli were related to transformative learning processes. Learning processes were related to individual student learning outcomes. In addition, adaptive and generative learning processes were positively related to team and instructor ratings of outcome quality, while transformative learning was negatively related to team ratings of outcome quality.

Research limitations/implications

The results were subject to the following limitations: cross‐sectional design, mostly self‐report measures, and the lack of control endemic to field research. As such, this study is viewed as an initial test of the team‐learning model in a field setting. Additional research, including longitudinal designs and experimental designs, are called for.

Practical implications

This study adds to the growing literature on group learning. Educators and managers need to be aware that there are different kinds of learning processes in which groups can engage and that these are stimulated to occur differently and have a different impact on outcomes.

Originality/value

Team learning is rarely assessed directly as a construct in its own right and there is a lack of empirical support delineating causes and consequences of team learning. This field study is a first step in this direction.

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 17 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

Keywords

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Article

George H. Kubik

To review the edited anthology Anticipatory Behavior in Adaptive Learning Systems: Foundations, Theories, and Systems.

Abstract

Purpose

To review the edited anthology Anticipatory Behavior in Adaptive Learning Systems: Foundations, Theories, and Systems.

Design/methodology/approach

Comments on the book's 16 articles that rapidly transition from introductory philosophy to specific research reports.

Findings

The consensus is that anticipatory behaviors are critical to performance in a variety of natural and built systems – especially adaptive learning systems. This outcome, with some disagreement among the authors, is demonstrated through a variety of exemplars.

Originality/value

The reviewer feels that this book is of seminal importance. The exploration of anticipatory behaviors as a legitimate and promising area of informed discourse and scientific research is novel and definitely a major contribution toward understanding and enhancing the performance of complex systems.

Details

On the Horizon, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

Keywords

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