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Article
Publication date: 21 June 2024

Suzanne de Janasz, Joy A. Schneer, Nicholas Beutell and Sowon Kim

The understudied psychosocial factors affecting Airbnb hosts are examined in this study by focusing on social isolation and willingness to remain as an Airbnb host. The espoused…

Abstract

Purpose

The understudied psychosocial factors affecting Airbnb hosts are examined in this study by focusing on social isolation and willingness to remain as an Airbnb host. The espoused benefits of host flexibility and autonomy have not been fully contextualized in relation to the real demands and costs of hosting.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses Social Support Theory to examine hosts’ perceptions of their positions. Data from 136 Airbnb hosts were analyzed using a structural model to explore relationships between social isolation, work-family conflict, mental wellbeing, and life satisfaction.

Findings

The results indicate that higher levels of social isolation were linked to greater work-family conflict, lower mental wellbeing, and reduced life satisfaction. Furthermore, social support was negatively correlated with social isolation.

Practical implications

As a result of social isolation, Airbnb hosts will need to find outside support (e.g. online gig worker communities, mental wellbeing apps) to meet work/life challenges. Gig work platforms should provide tools for gig workers to cultivate social support.

Originality/value

This research presents a needed focus on the paradox of gig work. Airbnb hosting can provide flexible employment and extra income, but it may also lead to social isolation, work-family conflict, and reduced wellbeing. These findings have significant implications for gig workers and contracting organizations, underlining the need to prioritize workers' social connections and overall wellbeing in the increasingly pervasive gig economy.

Details

Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Insights, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9792

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 18 June 2020

Hans-Georg Wolff and Sowon Kim

While studies have established that networking is an investment in an individual's career that pays off, recent research has begun to examine the potential costs of networking…

Abstract

Purpose

While studies have established that networking is an investment in an individual's career that pays off, recent research has begun to examine the potential costs of networking. This study suggests that prior research is limited in scope, as it remains focused on the work domain. Drawing upon the work home resources model (Ten Brummelhuis and Bakker, 2012), the authors broaden this perspective and develop a framework of negative consequences in nonwork domains. The paper proposes that networking generates costs in nonwork domains, because it requires the investment of finite energy resources in the work domain, and people lack these resources in other domains.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses structural equation modeling of multisource data from N = 306 individuals and their partners to examine how networking affects two distinct nonwork outcomes: work–family conflict and work–life balance.

Findings

Analyses support the general framework: networking is related to time- and strain-based work–family conflict, and work time mediates the relationship between networking and these forms of conflict. Moreover, networking exhibits an inverted U-shaped relationship with work–life balance, indicating that excessive networking as well as a lack of networking decrease work–life balance.

Originality/value

This study adds to the emergent literature on the negative consequences of networking. The findings suggest that employees and organizations should adopt a broader and more balanced perspective on networking: one that takes the well-known benefits – but also potential costs in work and nonwork domains – into account.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 25 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 17 May 2013

Sowon Kim

The purpose of this study is to examine how individuals network and develop instrumental relationships, focusing in particular on what enables and what constrains individuals'…

2024

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine how individuals network and develop instrumental relationships, focusing in particular on what enables and what constrains individuals' networking attempts.

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses a qualitative methodology. A total of 30 semi‐structured interviews with managers were conducted and analyzed using a grounded theory approach.

Findings

Access opportunities, positive perceptions, and compatible interests enable networking, whereas the absence or cessation of common interests constrains it. Furthermore, this paper sheds light on the iterative aspect of networking.

Research limitations/implications

Individuals' ability to recall networking experiences and social desirability bias might have influenced the single‐sourced data.

Practical implications

Networking is a complex career strategy that develops in conjunction with potential sponsors for which there is a need to focus on others and iteratively network from the start of one's career.

Originality/value

This qualitative study contributes to the growing body of research on networking and is the first to have identified what facilitates and what hinders networking attempts. It also integrates a dynamic perspective on developing relationships with potential sponsors.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 17 February 2012

Hans‐Georg Wolff and Sowon Kim

The purpose of this paper is to suggest a comprehensive framework to elucidate the relationship between personality and networking. Using the Five Factor Model as a framework, the…

8039

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to suggest a comprehensive framework to elucidate the relationship between personality and networking. Using the Five Factor Model as a framework, the paper aims to argue that traits tapping into social (i.e. extraversion, agreeableness) and informational (i.e. openness to experience) features are relevant in explaining how individual dispositions facilitate networking behaviors. Moreover, it aims to delineate structural and functional differences in networking (i.e. building, maintaining, and using contacts within and outside the organization) and to theorize how these differences yield differential relationships of personality traits with networking dimensions.

Design/methodology/approach

Online surveys were administered to two samples, from Germany and the UK, respectively (n=351). Structural equation modeling is used to test the hypotheses.

Findings

Personality traits reflecting social (extraversion) and informational aspects (openness to experience) are broadly related to networking in general. The paper also finds support for differential relationships, for example, agreeableness is related to internal, but not external networking. Both conscientiousness and emotional stability are not related to networking behaviors.

Practical implications

The findings help explain why some individuals experience more barriers to networking than others and can be used in networking trainings. Practitioners should also note that there is more than extraversion to accurately predict networking skills in selection assessments.

Originality/value

The paper provides further insights into determinants of networking, which is an important career self‐management strategy. It also offers an integrative framework on the personality‐networking relationship as prior research has been fragmentary. Establishing differential relations also furthers understanding on core differences between networking dimensions.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 4 February 2014

95

Abstract

Details

Career Development International, vol. 19 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 6 April 2022

Güldem Karamustafa-Köse, Susan C. Schneider and Jeff D. Davis

Despite best intentions, mergers and acquisitions often do not live up to the expectations for performance. This study examined how the salience of multiple identities creates…

1727

Abstract

Purpose

Despite best intentions, mergers and acquisitions often do not live up to the expectations for performance. This study examined how the salience of multiple identities creates dynamics in postmerger integration processes and how these dynamics influence the acquisition of the target's capabilities.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conducted an in-depth case study of a large American consumer goods multinational corporation's acquisition of a family-owned German beauty business and examined responses to decisions and events during the postmerger integration process.

Findings

The results show how and why efforts to acquire unique target capabilities might not deliver the hoped-for results. The authors discovered multiple identities that became salient during the postmerger integration process which subsequently influenced interpretations and reactions to decisions and events and which created intergroup dynamics. The authors also noted the role of language in making these identities salient. Such dynamics pose challenges to managing the postmerger integration process and to acquiring sought after capabilities.

Originality/value

This study reveals how different identities become salient in the interpretation of particular events and decisions, resulting in emotional and behavioral reactions and intergroup dynamics. Furthermore, it uncovers the role of language in making identities salient. This study offers further insight into identity dynamics when the capability of the target firm is the motive of the acquisition.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 35 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 9 February 2010

Barry Berman, Chuck McMellon, Michael Pearson and Donna Smith

455

Abstract

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 28 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Article
Publication date: 11 April 2023

Zahide Karakitapoğlu-Aygün, Berrin Erdogan, David E. Caughlin and Talya N. Bauer

Transformational leadership (TFL) has been suggested to create positive changes in employees with the goal of developing them into leaders. The authors integrate this…

Abstract

Purpose

Transformational leadership (TFL) has been suggested to create positive changes in employees with the goal of developing them into leaders. The authors integrate this well-established leadership style with recent research on idiosyncratic deals (i-deals). The authors suggest TFL as a predictor of task and development-based i-deals, and propose i-deals as a mediating mechanism linking TFL to employee outcomes (job satisfaction, job stress and manager-rated performance).

Design/methodology/approach

The authors used a time-lagged research design, and collected four waves of data from 140 employees and 78 leaders.

Findings

TFL was found to be an important predictor of i-deals. I-deals predicted job satisfaction and job stress; and it mediated the relationship between TFL and these two employee outcomes. Yet, i-deals were not associated with employee performance and did not mediate the relationship.

Originality/value

First, it shows that transformational leaders who consider employees' unique skills and support their professional growth are more likely to grant personalized arrangements. Second, drawing from social exchange theory, it illustrates that i-deals may act as a linkage between TFL and employee outcomes. The paper bridges leadership and i-deals literature to identify key leverage points through which leaders can enhance employee satisfaction, well-being and performance.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 53 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

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