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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2006

Narda R. Quigley and Walter G. Tymon

The purpose of this paper is to develop an integrative process model that explains the mechanisms through which intrinsic motivation can influence career self‐management

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13208

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop an integrative process model that explains the mechanisms through which intrinsic motivation can influence career self‐management and subsequent subjective and objective career success.

Design/methodology/approach

Research on career self‐management can benefit by incorporating an intrinsic motivation perspective. The paper proposes a model that depicts how four components of intrinsic motivation – meaningfulness, competence, choice, and progress – can contribute to career self‐management.

Findings

Because the manuscript is conceptual and theoretical in nature, there are no empirical findings to discuss. The paper does, however, advance six testable research propositions linking components of intrinsic motivation to career self‐management and career success.

Research limitations/implications

The model is most applicable for individuals who have some level of control over their own career choices and mobility. Also, we focus on intrinsic, rather than extrinsic, motivation, and we consider psychological and sense‐making aspects of motivation rather than structural and task‐based aspects. Propositions are advanced to be tested in future research; future research can use the model as a platform from which to study the connection between intrinsic motivation and career self‐management.

Practical implications

The paper describes how the model can be applied to help individuals navigate the realities and challenges of their careers.

Originality/value

Prior research has not specified the exact mechanisms through which intrinsic motivation may guide career self‐management. This paper provides an integrated process model addressing this need with relevance to researchers, career management professionals, and individuals.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 11 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2006

Dan S. Chiaburu, Vicki L. Baker and Adrian H. Pitariu

This study aims to investigate the relationship between proactive personality and career self‐management behaviors (job mobility preparedness and developmental…

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5337

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the relationship between proactive personality and career self‐management behaviors (job mobility preparedness and developmental feedback‐seeking behaviors), providing evidence for one mediator (career resilience) and one moderator (public self‐consciousness) on this relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

Data from 127 employees in one work organization, analyzed using regression analysis.

Findings

Proactive personality is positively related to career self‐management behaviors. Career resilience mediates this relationship. In addition, proactive personality and public self‐consciousness have an interactive effect, with developmental feedback‐seeking behaviors as the outcome.

Research limitations/implications

Despite the cross‐sectional nature of the study, the findings uncover mechanisms through which proactive personality is related to career self‐management behaviors. According to the findings, this relationship is subject to important intervening (career resilience) and boundary (public self‐consciousness) conditions.

Practical implications

The findings serve as a resource for practitioners interested in interventions. Specifically, practitioners in organizations where the results generalize can design interventions directed at enhancing the direct effect of proactive personality on career self‐management. These interventions can be directed to managing employees' career resilience and cognitively restructuring their public self‐consciousness perceptions.

Originality/value

This study adds to the literatures on career self‐management behaviors and proactive personality and explicates important intervening mechanisms in this relationship.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 11 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

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Article
Publication date: 21 September 2010

Mary Bambacas

This study aims to investigate how the relationship between two aspects of career management – the practice of career development activities by the organization…

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3360

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate how the relationship between two aspects of career management – the practice of career development activities by the organization (organizational career development) and career development activities by the individual (career self‐management), and affective and normative commitment levels, are influenced by the value that employees place on the career development offerings of their organizations.

Design/methodology/approach

Empirical evidence was drawn from 196 manager members of the Australian Institute of Management. Hierarchical moderated regression analysis was used to test the hypothesized relationships of the model.

Findings

Levels of affective and normative commitment improved when organizations provided continuous learning to managers. This was the case, for career management both by the individual, and by the organization. In particular, normative commitment was strongest for those who valued the continuous learning they received while managing their own careers. For the group of managers who experienced organizational career development the opposite was the case. Continuous learning provided by the organization improved their levels of affective commitment.

Research limitations/implications

Organizations must understand the needs of their staff so that they can provide career management practices that are valued and can enhance their levels of affective and normative commitment.

Originality/value

The paper highlights the importance of organizations paying attention to what individuals value so that they may fit with the organization and enhance their commitment to it. It also draws attention to career self‐management as a positive organizational initiative.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 29 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article
Publication date: 17 May 2013

Ans De Vos and Jesse Segers

Career self‐directedness is a concept that has gained widespread attention in the literature on new careers and managerial thinking about contemporary career development…

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1879

Abstract

Purpose

Career self‐directedness is a concept that has gained widespread attention in the literature on new careers and managerial thinking about contemporary career development. In a related sense, the topic of employee retirement has become popular in both the academic and managerial literature. However, to date, career self‐directedness has not been studied in relationship with older workers' retirement intentions. The purpose of this study is to test a model of the relationship between career self‐directedness and retirement intentions, mediated by career self‐management behaviors and engagement.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey was completed by 271 employees older than 45 working in five organizations. The average age was 53, and 59 percent were female. Participants had been with their current employer for an average of 16 years, and 58 percent of them worked fulltime. The survey included measures of self‐directed career attitude, career self‐management behaviors, engagement and retirement intention.

Findings

Results indicate that engagement and career self‐management behaviors fully mediated the relationship between self‐directed career attitude and retirement intention.

Originality/value

This is the first study to address career self‐directedness in relationship with retirement intentions, thereby considering the mediating role of career self‐management behaviors and engagement. As a result, this study contributes to insights in the validity of career self‐directedness as a predictor of career development using a sample of employees different from the main body of studies using samples of employees in their early career stages. Moreover, it sheds further light on the retirement process by including an individual career attitude and intermediating variables viewed as important to understand contemporary organizational behavior.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

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Article
Publication date: 6 June 2008

Dimitrios M. Mihail

The purpose of this paper is to examine the evidence that suggests how working graduates' careers are actually being managed in corporate Greece. In order to shed some…

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1498

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the evidence that suggests how working graduates' careers are actually being managed in corporate Greece. In order to shed some light on this issue, this empirical study aims to investigate the changing nature of careers from the employee's perspective, in various business contexts.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey was conducted using a structured questionnaire. Participants in the survey were 238 graduates working for firms across all sectors of the economy. Factor analysis was used to form career anchors/orientations, and career strategies from graduates' attitudes and statements reported in the survey. Regression analysis was applied for assessing the impact of alternative career orientations on career self‐management behaviors.

Findings

The main findings indicate that the primary source for shaping surveyed graduates' career strategies is their own career anchor/orientations. Other personal and organizational characteristics such as gender, age, work experience, field of specialization, economic sector and activity, firm size, and employment contract, seem to not have a persistent effect on respondents' personal career strategies. Furthermore, despite an emerging “new” career anchor, the traditional career of internal promotability still motivates graduates and leads them to pursue human capital accumulation and networking strategies.

Research limitations/implications

Further research to extend the current investigation to employers and managers would allow for a more articulated discussion of the main sources of the influences on employees' career self‐management behaviors.

Originality/value

Given the dearth of empirical research on the changing nature of careers in corporate Greece, this study contributes to debates in the wider academic community on the issue of analyzing career self‐management behaviours empirically. The importance of combining the human capital perspective with the social capital perspective in modeling career development, is stressed by the present study.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 37 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 22 June 2010

Nithya Tharmaseelan, Kerr Inkson and Stuart C. Carr

The paper seeks to determine whether different aspects of migrant pre‐migration characteristics (human capital and motivation to migrate) and post‐migration behaviour…

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2771

Abstract

Purpose

The paper seeks to determine whether different aspects of migrant pre‐migration characteristics (human capital and motivation to migrate) and post‐migration behaviour (social integration and career self‐management) predict migrants' post‐migration career success.

Design/methodology/approach

The research employed a survey questionnaire applied to a sample of 210 migrants who had migrated from Sri Lanka to New Zealand. Twenty‐three independent and three dependent (career success – objective and subjective) variables were measured. Sequential multiple regression analysis was applied, mirroring the time‐sequenced theory of career development.

Findings

Overall, migrants' occupational status had declined markedly following migration. Variables representing human capital, social integration and career self‐management perspectives all contributed substantially to explaining variances in career success, especially objective career success, but motivation to migrate did not. Human capital variables were especially influential in determining pre‐migration success, acculturation in the host country and education in the host country in post‐migration success. Effects of career self‐management behaviours on success were relatively small.

Research limitations/implications

A limitation is the cross‐sectional design, and possible non‐generalisability beyond a single migrant group and host country.

Practical implications

The paper discusses implications for migrants, policy makers and future research.

Originality/value

Migration, and interest in research on migrants' careers, is growing. This paper applies a wide range of predictor variables and a logical causal model to predicting migrant career success, indicates significant effects, and points to positive actions that may be taken by government, organisations and migrants.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

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Article
Publication date: 15 February 2011

Ruth Bridgstock

Although there is increasing evidence that the creative industries are essential to national economic growth as well as social and cultural well‐being, creative graduates…

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7974

Abstract

Purpose

Although there is increasing evidence that the creative industries are essential to national economic growth as well as social and cultural well‐being, creative graduates often find it difficult to become established professionally. This study aims to investigate the value of career management competence and intrinsic career motivations (as elements of “protean career orientation”) in predicting positive graduate outcomes.

Design/methodology/approach

Self‐report surveys were administered to 208 creative industries graduates from two Australian universities at two points in time: at course completion, and one year later.

Findings

The paper finds that individual career management competence and intrinsic work motivations, measured at course completion, were significant predictors of early career success, using both subjective and objective measures, measured one year later.

Practical implications

This study suggests that an emphasis on student development beyond the traditional “key” employability skills may well be worthwhile. The paper also suggests a broad learning and teaching approach by which universities can encourage the development of student career identity, and thus engender student intrinsic career motivations and career self management skills and behaviours.

Originality/value

This is one of the first studies to demonstrate empirically a link between a particular set of skills and graduate outcomes. In addition, it provides insights into the role of student career motivations in positive transitions to the world of work in the creative industries.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 53 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Book part
Publication date: 1 January 2012

Sara Louise Muhr, Michael Pedersen and Mats Alvesson

Contemporary working life highlights the challenge between exploitation and exploration both on a general and a more individual level. Here, we focus on the latter, and…

Abstract

Contemporary working life highlights the challenge between exploitation and exploration both on a general and a more individual level. Here, we focus on the latter, and connect the critical debate regarding self-management to March's exploitation/exploration trade-off, as this forms a useful theoretical frame to understand how employees make sense of their self-management efforts. The employee is subjected to an individual responsibility to understand and manage an exploration of the self while handling the norms of self-exploitation that a self-management culture creates. Through an empirical study of a large group of management consultants, we explore how they perform and make sense of self-exploitation and self-exploration through three specific discourses: the discourse of workload, the discourse of aspiration, and the discourse of fun. Through these, the consultants try to identify optimal amounts of work, play, and ambition, all while handling the trade-off between self-exploitation and self-exploration. We show how this keeps failing, but how it reappears as a necessary condition for avoiding future failures. In all three discourses, the trade-off therefore presents itself as the problem of as well as the solution to self-management.

Details

Managing ‘Human Resources’ by Exploiting and Exploring People’s Potentials
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-506-7

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 2 January 2020

Sam Jan Cees Krouwel, Anna van Luijn and Marjolein B.M. Zweekhorst

The purpose of this paper is to introduce a practical model for the evaluation and adaptation of educational programmes in order to incorporate employability development…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to introduce a practical model for the evaluation and adaptation of educational programmes in order to incorporate employability development focussed on enabling graduates to self-manage their career.

Design/methodology/approach

The model integrates several perspectives on and conceptualisations of the nature of employability and its development. The integration of various elements is justified on the basis of existing research and the experience of local educational practitioners.

Findings

The model integrates insights from the Graduate Employability Development model (Harvey et al., 2002), the CareerEDGE model (Dacre Pool and Sewell, 2007), the Career Management Employability model (Bridgstock, 2009) and adopts three career competencies as outcome indicators (Akkermans et al., 2013). The resulting model describes in simple terms what educational practitioners may adapt in the process of employability development to enhance the ability of prospective graduates to manage their own careers.

Research limitations/implications

The model remains theoretical and the relations it implies require further validation. Involving graduates and students in evaluating the model may contribute to validating its scope and applicability.

Practical implications

The model provides a practical tool to retrospectively and prospectively evaluate the institutional provision of employability development education. It may serve as a basis for adaptation to other programmes.

Originality/value

By adopting a processual perspective on employability, the model shifts away from the possession of a predefined set of characteristics, and towards enabling students to actively influence their own employability.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 62 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Article
Publication date: 20 February 2009

Marilyn Clarke

The purpose of this paper is to explore individual approaches to career and employability through the career stories of a group of mid‐level to senior managers in career

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4698

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore individual approaches to career and employability through the career stories of a group of mid‐level to senior managers in career transition. Career patterns are identified and then compared with traditional, boundaryless and protean models of career. The study aims to consider the extent to which individuals in this group had adopted behaviours supportive of future employability as opposed to behaviours more in line with traditional careers.

Design/methodology/approach

The research adopted an interpretive and qualitative approach. In‐depth interviews were conducted with people currently going through a career transition program. The interviews were recorded and then transcribed, coded and analysed using NVivo, a qualitative research software tool.

Findings

Career patterns appeared to be shifting away from traditional careers and more towards protean and boundaryless models. There was evidence of increased responsibility for career self‐management and of behaviours supportive of ongoing employability. Self‐perceived employability could be linked to degree of job mobility and having a future career orientation.

Research limitations/implications

Despite the small sample size and the subjective nature of self‐reported career histories the study provides insights into the relationship between career patterns and employability. Both organisations and individuals need to work towards developing attitudes and behaviours supportive of employability such as flexibility, adaptability and a future career orientation.

Practical implications

Individual level career management will need to focus more on the development of attitudes and behaviours appropriate to contemporary employment relationships than on the development of formal career plans. At an organizational level support can be provided by encouraging flexibility through activities such as job rotation, short‐term projects and opportunities for both internal and external networking.

Originality/value

The study provides empirical evidence of how careers are being managed within contemporary employment relationships.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

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