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Article
Publication date: 3 April 2017

Soo Jeoung Han, Chungil Chae, Patricia Macko, Woongbae Park and Michael Beyerlein

As technology-mediated communication improves, many organizations increasingly use new types of collaborative online tools to promote team-based learning and performance. The…

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Abstract

Purpose

As technology-mediated communication improves, many organizations increasingly use new types of collaborative online tools to promote team-based learning and performance. The purpose of this study is to explore how virtual team leaders cope with process challenges in developing a context for team creativity.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors interviewed nine leaders who have worked for more than five years and managed virtual teams in different fields.

Findings

This research uncovered distrust, personality differences, generational differences in views, scheduling issues and technology difficulties as the top five inhibitors for virtual team creativity and success. The authors identified seven main strategies for developing virtual team creativity and success. The authors found that building “team norms” and guidelines to encourage positive interactions between team members can facilitate team creativity. In addition, a concept of trust-based open communication was identified as one of the important strategies when teams actively use technology-mediated communication tools.

Practical implications

Organizational practitioners can use the results of this study when developing knowledge to establish assessments regarding which employees possess the appropriate characteristics to lead virtual teams and implement virtual team training.

Originality/value

This study emphasizes the importance of technology in professional lives by showing how technology-mediated work leads to success in learning and producing creative ideas and performance in a virtual team environment.

Details

European Journal of Training and Development, vol. 41 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 29 December 2022

Soo Jeoung Han, Lei Xie, Michael Beyerlein and Rodney Boehm

As a cornerstone of team performance, learning depends on each member’s mindset. Drawing on implicit theories of intelligence, the purpose of this study is to investigate the…

Abstract

Purpose

As a cornerstone of team performance, learning depends on each member’s mindset. Drawing on implicit theories of intelligence, the purpose of this study is to investigate the relationships among individual members’ mindsets and shared leadership (SL) behaviors in design teams and the mediation role of team growth mindset (TGM) on that relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors analyzed survey results based on individuals who participated in an international design competition. To test the hypothesized model, the data was analyzed by using SEM using Mplus 7.

Findings

The results indicated that an individual growth mindset (IGM; but not an individual-fixed mindset) has significant and positive direct effects on a team growth mindset and SL behaviors. In addition, a TGM mediates the relationship between an IGM and SL.

Originality/value

The research discusses several theoretical and practical implications for human resource development professionals and scholars to improve understanding of a TGM and its influence on individual mindsets and SL behaviors.

Details

European Journal of Training and Development, vol. 48 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 January 2019

Yonjoo Cho, Jiwon Park, Soo Jeoung Han and Yedam Ho

The purpose of this paper is to explore how multinational corporations’ (MNCs’) women leaders in South Korea (Korea) have overcome career challenges in the process of becoming…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore how multinational corporations’ (MNCs’) women leaders in South Korea (Korea) have overcome career challenges in the process of becoming CEOs. The two guiding questions for this study included: what career challenges have MNCs’ women leaders in Korea faced to become CEOs? How have they overcome their career challenges?

Design/methodology/approach

The authors used a basic qualitative research design, the goal of which is to understand how people make sense of their lives and experiences. Qualitative data were collected by semi-structured interviews with 15 women CEOs at MNCs in Korea to capture their lived experiences (challenges and strategies) in their careers. The authors used NVivo 11, a qualitative data analysis software, to analyze the interview data.

Findings

From data analysis, the authors identified five themes including: becoming a CEO, key success factors, MNC culture, career challenges and career development strategies. The authors found that in the process of becoming CEOs, 15 women leaders faced career challenges that are largely generated by traditional culture, work stress and work–life balance. The authors also found that the women leaders became CEOs through diverse on-the-job experiences (e.g. marketing and sales) and positions (e.g. managers, senior managers and regional directors) with organizational support (e.g. supervisor support).

Research limitations/implications

Given research on organizational support for leadership, human resource practices and working conditions, this study’s findings have qualitatively confirmed the importance of organizational support for women CEOs’ career success. For theory building in women in leadership, the authors suggest that researchers investigate the complex process of becoming women CEOs, including their early experiences in their career in tandem with family background, organizational climate and national culture.

Practical implications

The study findings on women CEOs’ career strategies can be used as a reference for women in the leadership pipeline who aspire to take leadership positions in organizations. A lack of role models or mentors for women leaders is one of the reasons why women give up on their career. Learning career strategies (e.g. global development programs, mentoring and networks) that women CEOs have employed to overcome their career challenges can help women in the leadership pipeline from their early career on.

Originality/value

The authors found that both internal and external factors combined were instrumental in the women CEOs’ career success. What stood out from this study was that the women’s desirable personality attributes might not have materialized without the MNC culture that has been supportive for these women. The women CEOs shared their company’s values and philosophy that is based on gender equality, received supervisor support that is crucial for their career success, experienced diverse jobs and positions along the way and were recognized for their work ethic. Given research on women leaders conducted largely in western contexts, this qualitative study on the lived experiences of women CEOs in MNCs contributes to emerging non-western research by capturing the importance of culture that is uniquely Korean.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 24 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 27 October 2020

Soo Jeoung Han, Mehrangiz Abadi, Bora Jin and Jie Chen

The authors examined team-learning processes in short-term student project teams operating in an intensive design competition at a public university. The purpose of this paper is…

Abstract

Purpose

The authors examined team-learning processes in short-term student project teams operating in an intensive design competition at a public university. The purpose of this paper is to explore the critical facilitators, inhibitors and processes for fostering students' creativity within interdisciplinary design teams in higher education.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors used a qualitative design to explore facilitators, inhibitors and critical processes in interdisciplinary student project teams. They conducted focus group interviews with three winning interdisciplinary teams that participated in a three-day design competition and used a constant comparison to analyze the data.

Findings

The authors identified themes that contributed to creativity at the individual level, the team level and the resource level. The key findings included 12 critical team process phases to achieve one common goal.

Originality/value

The findings of the study yielded to a holistic model of interdisciplinary team development for creativity. Implications for educators and practitioners and suggestions for researchers to expand the interdisciplinary team process model were discussed to facilitate interdisciplinary team creativity in higher education.

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 November 2017

Soo Jeoung Han, Yunsoo Lee, Michael Beyerlein and Judith Kolb

This paper aims to examine the effect of shared leadership on student project team processes and outcomes. The authors focused on shared leadership and its association with team…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the effect of shared leadership on student project team processes and outcomes. The authors focused on shared leadership and its association with team processes (coordination, goal commitment and knowledge sharing) and team performance.

Design/methodology/approach

To examine the shared leadership, team processes and performance model, the authors conducted two separate surveys of 158 graduate and undergraduate students working in project teams at a large southwestern university.

Findings

Results showed that shared leadership positively affected coordination activities, goal commitment and knowledge sharing, which in turn positively affect team performance. Each team process factor had a mediation effect, although shared leadership had no direct effect on team performance.

Research limitations/implications

This research adds to the knowledge of important team process factors through which shared leadership indirectly affects team performance.

Practical implications

Based on the findings, the authors provided implications for students and instructors that shared leadership can facilitate team performance by enabling team members to coordinate activities, commit to goals and share knowledge effectively.

Originality/value

This study presents an initial understanding of the shared leadership-team performance relationship by introducing influential variables, such as coordination activities, goal commitment and knowledge sharing in a team.

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 24 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 July 2021

Jiwon Park, Soo Jeoung Han, Jiyoung Kim and Woocheol Kim

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the structural relationships among transformational leadership, affective organizational commitment and job performance, as well as the…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the structural relationships among transformational leadership, affective organizational commitment and job performance, as well as the mediating effect of employee engagement on their relationships.

Design/methodology/approach

To examine the structural relationships among the research variables, structural equation modeling analysis and bootstrap estimates were performed using the data of 600 full-time employees working in Korean private organizations.

Findings

The results of the data analysis suggest that transformational leadership had a significant impact on employee affective organizational commitment and job performance through employee engagement as a mediator. Specifically, employee engagement partially mediated the mechanism in which transformational leadership affects employee affective organizational commitment, whereas there existed a full mediation of the association between transformational leadership and job performance.

Practical implications

The study finding suggested that transformational leadership was the key catalyst in both encouraging affective organizational commitment and task performance of employees throughout the mediator, employee engagement. Thus, organizations need to create a safe and positive environment that promotes employee engagement and should offer interventions for leaders to build skill sets of transformational leadership.

Originality/value

Because previous studies had explored the impacts of transformational leadership on employee positive attitude and job performance separately, there is little known about how these three constructs correlate. By investigating the impacts of transformational leadership on attitude and performance simultaneously in this study, this study expanded to the extant literature by providing better understanding of transformational leadership. Moreover, given that articles on transformational leadership have been limited in the HRD literature, findings of this study can offer trustworthy information for HRD practice and encourage HRD scholars to explore transformational leadership-related research.

Details

European Journal of Training and Development, vol. 46 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 26 July 2022

Baek-Kyoo Joo, Jeong-Ha Yim, Young Sim Jin and Soo Jeoung Han

This study aims to investigate the relationship between empowering leadership and employee creativity and the mediating roles of work engagement and knowledge sharing in this…

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Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the relationship between empowering leadership and employee creativity and the mediating roles of work engagement and knowledge sharing in this relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

Using the results of a survey of 302 knowledge workers from a leading telecommunications company in South Korea, the relationships among the variables empowering leadership, work engagement and knowledge sharing on employee creativity were analyzed using conducted confirmatory factor analysis and structural equation modeling. This study conducted bootstrap analyses to test the mediating effects.

Findings

Empowering leadership was positively and significantly associated with work engagement and knowledge sharing. Work engagement was significantly related to knowledge sharing and employee creativity. In turn, knowledge sharing was significantly associated with employee creativity. The direct effect of empowering leadership on employee creativity was nonsignificant, but this study found a significant indirect effect of empowering leadership on employee creativity via the significant mediating roles of work engagement and knowledge sharing.

Originality/value

This study introduced empowering leadership that may work for knowledge workers who create new ideas by analyzing data from the knowledge workers’ perceptions of their leaders in the workplace. The intuitive linkage between work engagement and knowledge sharing was empirically verified in this study. This study’s findings and implications provide direction for knowledge workers and how their managers should support employees’ work environment and activities.

Details

European Journal of Training and Development, vol. 47 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 31 July 2023

Junhee Kim, Michael Beyerlein, Jia Wang and Soo Jeoung Han

The study attempts to build a creative learning transfer (CLT) theory represented by a nomological network incorporating relevant theories and empirical support for the…

Abstract

Purpose

The study attempts to build a creative learning transfer (CLT) theory represented by a nomological network incorporating relevant theories and empirical support for the relationships among the transfer predictors in the learning transfer system (LTS), leaders' CLT and their job performance.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors used 76-item survey data from 471 managers who worked for 16 large companies located in South Korea, had completed leadership training at least three months before the data collection and had received a performance review just before the data collection. A series of exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses (CFA) and reliability tests were conducted, followed by a common method variance test and structural equation modeling.

Findings

A nomological network of LTS, CLT and job performance was established. The findings supported the mechanism for motivating managers to transfer acquired leadership skills to challenging organizational situations and eventually, increase their managerial job performance. This study provided a parsimonious CLT scale and verified the influence of CLT on leaders' job performance.

Originality/value

This study is the first attempt to measure the concept of CLT and suggest a parsimonious CLT scale. In addition, this study conceptualized, operationalized and confirmed a nomological network for CLT. Organizations may develop such a system and help managers apply the learned leadership knowledge and skills to novel business situations for creating more competitive work systems, products and services.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 44 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 29 June 2020

Soo Jeoung Han and Gary N. McLean

The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of family-supportive supervisor behaviors and organizational climate on employees’ work–family conflict, job satisfaction…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of family-supportive supervisor behaviors and organizational climate on employees’ work–family conflict, job satisfaction and turnover intentions.

Design/methodology/approach

To examine the causal relationship, the longitudinal panel data of the work, family and health study were used, using the data of 664 respondents who participated in surveys from all four time-points at two Fortune 500 information technology (IT) companies.

Findings

The results of the data analysis suggested that family-supportive supervisor behaviors have a minimal, but statistically significant, impact on work-to-family conflict and organizational work-family climate. Moreover, work-to-family conflict minimally mediated the relationship between family-supportive supervisor behaviors and employees’ turnover intentions. An organizational work-family climate had a small, but statistically significant, mediating effect between family-supportive supervisor behaviors and job satisfaction/turnover intentions.

Practical implications

This study has practical implications by noting that relying on only individual managers’ roles or training managers to be family-supportive may not be enough to improve family-oriented organizational culture, work–life balance and job-related outcomes.

Originality/value

Using a longitudinal mediation model, the authors examined the effects of family-supportive supervisor behaviors and how those behaviors impact other variables over time. Despite the expectation of such an impact, the authors found minimal effects among variables. This study is valuable because it can stimulate future research to advance the theoretical and practical understanding of family-supportive supervisor behaviors to help determine why the study found that it had very little impact on both work–family conflict and a family-friendly organizational climate to increase employees’ satisfaction to continue to work.

Details

European Journal of Training and Development, vol. 44 no. 6/7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 July 2017

Yonjoo Cho, Jiwon Park, Soo Jeoung “Crystal” Han, Boreum Ju, Jieun You, Ahreum Ju, Chan Kyun Park and Hye Young Park

The purpose of this study was to compare South Korean female executives’ definitions of career success with those of male executives, identify their career development strategies…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to compare South Korean female executives’ definitions of career success with those of male executives, identify their career development strategies for success and provide implications for research and practice. Two research questions guiding our inquiry included: How do female executives’ definitions of career success differ from those of male executives? What career development strategies do male and female executives use for career success?

Design/methodology/approach

A basic qualitative research design was used and semi-structured interviews were conducted with 15 male executives and 15 female executives in diverse corporations by using an interview protocol of 13 questions regarding participants’ background, definitions of career success and final thoughts. To analyze the interview data, we used both NVivo 11 and a manual coding method.

Findings

Gender differences were detected in the participants’ definitions of career success and success factors. As previous studies indicated, male and female executives had different perspectives on career success: men tended to define career success more objectively than women. Many male executives, through experiencing transforming changes in their careers, began to appreciate work–life balance and personal happiness from success. Gender differences were also detected in their career development challenges, meanings of mentors and networking activities. While work stress surfaced as a challenge that men faced, experiencing the token status in the gendered workplace was a major challenge for female participants.

Research limitations/implications

In this study, three research agendas are presented, needing further investigation on career success, women’s token status and comparative analyses.

Practical implications

Three implications for practice have been provided, including organizational support, government’s role and HRD’s role.

Originality/value

Gender differences in this study were not as distinctive as previous literature has indicated. Some male executives valued more subjective career success than others, while a few female executives spoke of more objective definitions than others. These subtle differences could be captured through in-depth interviews. By hearing the participants’ stories, both objective and subjective definitions of success, for both genders, could be observed, which might not have been possible in quantitative research. In addition, the study findings reflect the nature of a uniquely Korean context. The participants worked in a Confucian and military culture, which operates in hierarchical structures and the command and control system, coupled with a heightened camaraderie spirit in the workplace.

Details

European Journal of Training and Development, vol. 41 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

Keywords

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