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Article
Publication date: 25 January 2019

Robert L. Heath and Damion Waymer

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the proactive role elite organizations play within-network corporate social responsibility (CSR) performance by determining…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the proactive role elite organizations play within-network corporate social responsibility (CSR) performance by determining whether organizations can be identified that serve as aspirational CSR role models. The assumption is that elite CSR performance inspires and challenges other in-network actors to raise their standards in order to be legitimate, and resource rewardable.

Design/methodology/approach

Three cases are discussed to exemplify elite CSR: historical: recognizing the value of embracing a trend in improved standards of meatpacking, Armour Meatpacking campaigned for sanitary meatpacking and implemented strategic change; global energy: Chevron Corporation conducts “business in a socially and environmentally responsible manner, respecting the law and universal human rights to benefit the communities where we work”; and non-profit: “Elite” universities’ CSR standards attract bright faculty and students and build beneficial relationships with industry, government and peers.

Findings

Elite institutions raise CSR standards by using issue trends to guide strategic change that can performatively demonstrate the societal value of proactive leadership that elevates standards and increases the reward value to communities and organizations that is achieved by adopting higher standards.

Research limitations/implications

Through micro-politics that increase CSR social productivity, elite CSR standards earn rewards for exemplary organizations and subsequently raise standards for in-network organizations to, in turn, achieve the license to operate.

Practical implications

Discussions of CSR should consider the influences that establish CSR standards. To that end, this paper offers the explanatory power of a micro-political, societal productivity approach to CSR based on the pragmatic/moral resource dependency paradigm.

Social implications

The paper reasons that higher CSR standards result when NGO stakeholder critics and/or government agencies exert micro-political pressure. In response to such pressure, elite organizations, those that are or can meet those higher CSR standards, proactively demonstrate how higher CSR standards can accrue resources that benefit them and society. Elite CSR performance challenges other in-network actors to raise standards in order to be legitimate, that is resource rewardable.

Originality/value

Because elite organizations understand the reward advantage of higher levels of CSR, they proactively elevate the discuss of standards and advantages for achieving them, and penalties for falling short.

Details

Corporate Communications: An International Journal, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1356-3289

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Article
Publication date: 8 January 2018

Lara Chaplin and Simon T.J. O’Rourke

It seems to be the consensus (Zhang et al., 2012; George et al., 2003; Arumugam et al., 2013) that Lean Six Sigma (LSS) has become a beneficial improvement initiative used…

Abstract

Purpose

It seems to be the consensus (Zhang et al., 2012; George et al., 2003; Arumugam et al., 2013) that Lean Six Sigma (LSS) has become a beneficial improvement initiative used in a variety of industries. There is a move towards integrating any high-level business improvement methods holistically throughout the whole organisation. Indeed, Hoerl (2014) explored the idea that when using LSS for business improvement, the programme should engage the whole organisation in much the same way as the financial function is present throughout each department. The purpose of this paper is to posit that using the lean and green agenda may be the driver to achieve integration.

Design/methodology/approach

The research adopted a subjective ontological perspective with the researcher using participant observation as the main research instrument. Denzin and Lincoln (2005) note that it is now common for scholars to argue that the only relevant data are those based upon the personal experience of the researcher; this served as an informing foundation for the approach for the exploration of the topic. Based on multiple case studies, chosen because they operate in different sectors, the paper adopted an extended case method (Burawoy, 1998) to analyse and gather the research. The organisations were chosen because they both were at a similar stage in their continuous improvement (CI) journey. The main reasoning behind the selection of the two different organisations is to reach “Thick Description” (Geertz, 1973, p. 3, 2001).

Findings

The findings suggest that there are still significant benefits of implementing a large-scale lean agenda in particular when using an LSS methodology. The paper finds that there are also significant gaps in achieving full integration within the organisation and argues that lean and CI are still the remit of the operations manager. The document goes on to argue that if the CI initiative is driven by the corporate social responsibility (CSR) plan, then any lean/lean green implementation will enable the company to drive CI integration with all stakeholders.

Research limitations/implications

The research has implications for those responsible for the CSR function within the organisation and the operations manager who is charged with implementing any lean/lean and green CI.

Practical implications

The paper argues that the lean and green agenda can drive integration of any CI activity throughout the organisation and suggests that the way this can be achieved is any CI activity that is included in the wider CSR plan.

Social implications

This paper contributes to the “lean and green” agenda and offers a solution for the problem of integrating LSS activities throughout the whole organisation by placing CI and LSS within the CSR remit.

Originality/value

There is little consensus how this holistic integrated approach should be implemented by the company. This research uses multiple case studies to critically examine the application of LSS as an improvement programme within two large UK-based organisations, each company operating in very different industry sectors to identify the benefits of LSS but also the missed “green/societal” opportunities and argues that if any lean and lean and green agenda is to be holistically adopted, then any CI activity should be driven by the CSR department.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. 67 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2001

Geoffrey P. Lantos

Reviews the development of the corporate social responsibility (CSR) concept and its four components: economic, legal, ethical and altruistic duties. Discusses different…

Abstract

Reviews the development of the corporate social responsibility (CSR) concept and its four components: economic, legal, ethical and altruistic duties. Discusses different perspectives on the proper role of business in society, from profit making to community service provider. Suggests that much of the confusion and controversy over CSR stem from a failure to distinguish among ethical, altruistic and strategic forms of CSR. On the basis of a thorough examination of the arguments for and against altruistic CSR, concurs with Milton Friedman that altruistic CSR is not a legitimate role of business. Proposes that ethical CSR, grounded in the concept of ethical duties and responsibilities, is mandatory. Concludes that strategic CSR is good for business and society. Advises that marketing take a lead role in strategic CSR activities. Notes difficulties in CSR practice and offers suggestions for marketers in planning for strategic CSR and for academic researchers in further clarifying the boundaries of strategic CSR.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 18 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Content available
Article
Publication date: 14 October 2019

Rasha Kamal El-Deen El-Mallah, Alia Abd el Hamid Aref and Sherifa Sherif

The purpose of this paper is as follows: First, understanding the nature of the relationship between corporate adoption of the concept of societal responsibility…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is as follows: First, understanding the nature of the relationship between corporate adoption of the concept of societal responsibility [availability of environmental awareness, clear vision of the impact of societal responsibility on financial performance, managers informing employees of the latest developments in societal responsibility programs, managers' response to their corporate social responsibility (CSR) proposals] in the form of an annual report that supports the success of the company's objectives, the company's management encourages employees to participate collectively in societal responsibility programs and to protect the environment from pollution in the petrochemical industry. Second, understand the nature of the relationship between the dimensions of corporate social responsibility concept (cultural, social, economic, ethical and legal) and protect the environment from pollution in the petrochemical industry. Third, the research also seeks to show the role of societal responsibility and its application in the petrochemical companies to protect the environment from pollution in The Governorate of Alexandria – Egypt, and come out with results and recommendations that could help protect the environment from the forms of environmental pollution resulting from the production processes of this industry.

Design/methodology/approach

The researcher has relied on each of the following approaches: Case study methodology is a research strategy aimed at solving a problem or facing a particular situation. It is based on preliminary hypotheses through full analysis of all data collected and recorded. Which depends on the study of a limited number of cases or vocabulary in-depth comprehensive study through the study of all or a large number of variables overlapping and interrelated and influential on the problem under consideration. Thus, it provides a deep and rich understanding of what is going on around the research and the processes that are related to it, and not only the external or apparent description of the situation or phenomenon; it cares about the total description and looks at the particles, in relation to the whole. Quantitative approach: by giving a numerical description indicating the size or size of the phenomenon or the degree of association with the phenomenon. Other phenomena. Accordingly, the role of the petrochemical companies in Alexandria Governorate, and the social responsibility programs carried out within the governorate in terms of importance, growth and requirements, and the most important characteristics and constraints and components and methods of work and developments have been described. Thus, the researcher can analyze the relationship between CSR and environmental protection from pollution in Alexandria Governorate.

Findings

There is paucity in the studies that dealt with the relationship between CSR and environmental protection against pollution in public organizations. There is agreement among the sample on the importance and feasibility of adopting the concept of social responsibility and placing it at the top of the top management concerns, especially in the field of petrochemical companies. With the need to take concrete implementation measures to support social responsibility programs aimed at serving the community among all stakeholders. The effective implementation of the mechanisms for the implementation of meaningful social responsibility programs requires fundamental changes in management practices, existing organizational structures and the quality of personnel working in the relevant departments, in general, and the social responsibility group, in particular, which may be difficult for political and economic reasons.

Research limitations/implications

Time: The study period was set from 2015 to 2017. Place: The study focuses on the petrochemical companies operating in Alexandria. Humanity: The study focuses on the employees of the petrochemical companies operating in Alexandria Governorate.

Practical implications

The adoption of social responsibility positively affects the protection of the environment from pollution, and this effect shows that the adoption of the concept of corporate social responsibility is influenced by the following factors: increasing the participation of workers with healthy environmental contributions to the productive process; increasing the companies' economic and social activities toward protecting the environment from pollution; increasing the capacity of companies to pay greater costs to preserve the environment; increasing the awareness of green consumers with the products it offers Companies; development of continuous internal work environment companies; and clearly defined strategy followed in social responsibility programs.

Social implications

The social responsibility of the public organizations derives their strength through, first, the keenness of these organizations to analyze the variables of the ethical dimension of social responsibility and their availability, which will lead the organizations to provide their services with the highest quality and sincerity. That this analysis (ethics of individuals) as training members of the social responsibility team to solve problems using brainstorming and provide employees with official data related to improving work (ethics of leadership), such as the identification of business objectives through the participation of managers with subordinates, and the punishment of workers who exhibit immoral behaviors (ethics of productive processes) as a decision-making process to ethical standards regardless of the costs involved. When there is an immoral behavior and managers are responsible for implementing the changes needed to reach the targeted outcomes), second, promote partnerships with other relevant sectors for community service.

Originality/value

According to the results of the previous studies and the applied study results, the researcher would like to submit a mechanism to the directors and heads of the boards of directors of the Egyptian petrochemical companies under study.

Details

Review of Economics and Political Science, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2356-9980

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Book part
Publication date: 7 November 2017

Ashli Quesinberry Stokes

An ongoing public relations (PR) crisis resulted from the behavior of Mylan, a pharmaceutical company, regarding its well-known antianaphylaxis product, the EpiPen…

Abstract

An ongoing public relations (PR) crisis resulted from the behavior of Mylan, a pharmaceutical company, regarding its well-known antianaphylaxis product, the EpiPen. Mylan’s mishandling of the EpiPen controversy widened its legitimacy gap among external stakeholder groups – as well as among its employees. Its actions conflicted with the values expressed by its corporate social responsibility (CSR) rhetoric and jeopardized stakeholders’ commitment, loyalty, and productivity. In this chapter, I argue that #EpiGate renders Mylan unable to activate the type of collective identity orientation needed among employees during a legitimacy controversy. Employing identification and storytelling as critical lenses, rhetorical analysis of Mylan’s CSR documents suggests how its contradictory messages compounded its legitimacy gap among employees. Mylan’s inability to address rising CSR expectations among employees involves both human resources (HR) and PR practitioners. Suggestions for how these functions should work together to better shore up expression of CSR values with employee expectations are provided.

Details

Corporate Social Responsibility, Sustainability, and Ethical Public Relations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-585-6

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Article
Publication date: 9 May 2016

Mark Anthony Camilleri

This paper aims to deliberate on how corporate social responsibility (CSR) ought to be reconceived for better educational outcomes. It suggests that there are win-win…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to deliberate on how corporate social responsibility (CSR) ought to be reconceived for better educational outcomes. It suggests that there are win-win opportunities for corporations and national governments to nurture human capital and address any skill gaps and mismatches in the labour market.

Design/methodology/approach

The businesses’ involvement in setting curriculum programmes may help to improve the quality and effectiveness of extant educational systems. This contribution reports on how different organisations are already engaging in responsible behaviours with varying degrees of intensity and success across many contexts.

Findings

Many firms are often training and sponsoring individuals to pursue further studies for their career advancement. It also indicated that there are businesses that are engaging in laudable behaviours to attract prospective employees. Moreover, this paper contends that the provision of education, professional development and training will boost the employees’ morale and job satisfaction, which may, in turn, lead to lower staff turnover rates and greater productivity levels in workplace environments.

Social implications

This contribution implies that organisational cultures and their business ethos could be attuned with the governments’ educational policies to actively respond to the diverse needs of today’s learners and tomorrow’s human resources.

Originality/value

There is a business case for CSR as the corporations’ strategies realign their economic success with societal progress. Arguably, there is potential that such responsible behaviours can bring reputational benefits, enhance the firms’ image among external stakeholders and could lead to a favourable climate of trust and cooperation within the company itself.

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Book part
Publication date: 30 March 2017

Julia M. Puaschunder

The 2008/2009 World Financial Crisis underlined the importance of social responsibility for the sustainable functioning of economic markets. Heralding an age of novel…

Abstract

The 2008/2009 World Financial Crisis underlined the importance of social responsibility for the sustainable functioning of economic markets. Heralding an age of novel heterodox economic thinking, the call for integrating social facets into mainstream economic models has reached unprecedented momentum. Financial Social Responsibility bridges the finance world with society in socially conscientious investments. Socially Responsible Investment (SRI) integrates corporate social responsibility in investment choices. In the aftermath of the 2008/2009 World Financial Crisis, SRI is an idea whose time has come. Socially conscientious asset allocation styles add to expected yield and volatility of securities social, environmental, and institutional considerations. In screenings, shareholder advocacy, community investing, social venture capital funding and political divestiture, socially conscientious investors hone their interest to align financial profit maximization strategies with social concerns. In a long history of classic finance theory having blacked out moral and ethical considerations of investment decision making, our knowledge of socio-economic motives for SRI is limited. Apart from economic profitability calculus and strategic leadership advantages, this paper sheds light on socio-psychological motives underlying SRI. Altruism, need for innovation and entrepreneurial zest alongside utility derived from social status enhancement prospects and transparency may steer investors’ social conscientiousness. Self-enhancement and social expression of future-oriented SRI options may supplement profit maximization goals. Theoretically introducing potential SRI motives serves as a first step toward an empirical validation of Financial Social Responsibility to improve the interplay of financial markets and the real economy. The pursuit of crisis-robust and sustainable financial markets through strengthened Financial Social Responsibility targets at creating lasting societal value for this generation and the following.

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Article
Publication date: 7 August 2017

William Il kuk Kang and Gaston Fornes

The purpose of this paper is to explore and understand corporate social responsibility (CSR) and human resource management (HRM) practices of the UK and Japan, who share…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore and understand corporate social responsibility (CSR) and human resource management (HRM) practices of the UK and Japan, who share opposing societal and cultural characteristics, from a national business system (NBS) perspective, to answer the following two questions: the extent of convergence/divergence of CSR-HRM of two very different NBS, and the institutional relations behind the convergence/divergence.

Design/methodology/approach

For these purposes, the paper proposes a framework that can be utilised to understand the complex relationships between institutions, HRM, and CSR. Using a qualitative approach and grounded theory analysis as well as multiple-case analysis of six cases from the UK and Japan, the findings are tested against the framework.

Findings

The paper was able to confirm that mimetic and coercive isomorphism from global institutional pressure cause certain convergence of CSR-HRM in these two nations. However, simultaneously, the local institutional pressure (i.e. NBS) appears to be deeply rooted and is more salient at micro-level, resulting in diversified CSR-HRM in the two nations. As a result, it appears that convergence and divergence co-exist due to their differences in NBS with possibility of “crossvergence”.

Originality/value

This paper’s significance lies not only in contributing to the existing convergence–divergence debate on both CSR and HRM but also to help understanding of how Western CSR-HRM concepts are utilized and interpreted in East Asian countries with very different NBS from the West, with the aid of the proposed framework.

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Book part
Publication date: 7 February 2013

George K. Amoako, Ruby Melody Agbola, Robert K. Dzogbenuku and Evans Sokro

Issues concerning society are everybody's business. Therefore, individuals, larger or smaller groups, formal or informal entities, public or private firms, governmental or…

Abstract

Issues concerning society are everybody's business. Therefore, individuals, larger or smaller groups, formal or informal entities, public or private firms, governmental or non-governmental organisations who are key stakeholders of society must always aspire to champion societal concerns. Society's welfare should be everybody's business. Corporate social responsibility (CSR) in a broad sense can be viewed as the relationship of organisations with society as a whole, and the need for organisations to align their values with societal expectations (Atuguba & Dowuona-Hammond, 2006). In reality, it is a set of standards by which organisations can impact their environment with the potential of creating sustainable development (Helg, 2007). It is critical that society educates everyone to be responsible. From all societal actors, universities are the ones educating the future elites of a country. What they teach and do not teach may make or break a nation's future and well-being. As noted by Dashwood and Puplampu (2010), there is a greater need for crafting a sustainable, strategic and mutually beneficial set of responsible actions in embracing the right approaches to CSR. According to them, such actions should emanate from a genuine recognition of, and attention to, economic, traditional, historical, as well as business arguments from the perspectives of the stakeholders and interest groups.

Details

Education and Corporate Social Responsibility International Perspectives
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-590-6

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Article
Publication date: 3 April 2017

Christiane Marie Høvring

The debate on corporate social responsibility (CSR) as shared value creation is trapped between management scholars and business ethics scholars, focusing merely on the…

Abstract

Purpose

The debate on corporate social responsibility (CSR) as shared value creation is trapped between management scholars and business ethics scholars, focusing merely on the distribution of values from an outcome-oriented perspective. The result is a juxtaposition of shared value from either a corporate or a societal perspective, providing only little attention to the actual communication processes supporting the creation of shared value. The purpose of this paper is to re-conceptualize shared value creation from a communicative approach as an alternative to the current situation caught between the management and societal perspectives.

Design/methodology/approach

Building upon recent constitutive models of CSR communication, this conceptual paper explores the potentials and implications of re-conceptualizing shared value creation as an alternative approach that recognizes the tensional interaction processes related to shared value creation.

Findings

The paper suggests a new conceptualization of shared value creation, which is sensitive to and able to advance the understanding of the tensional and conflictual interaction processes in which the continuous negotiation of corporate and stakeholder interests, values and agendas may facilitate a new understanding of shared value creation.

Practical implications

In order to succeed with the shared purpose of creating shared value (CSV), the company and the multiple stakeholders should neither disregard nor idealize the interaction processes related to shared value creation; rather, they should acknowledge that processes filled with tensions and conflicts are prerequisites for CSV.

Originality/value

A re-conceptualization of shared value creation that provides an alternative approach that is sensitive toward the tensions and conflicts occurring between corporate voice and multiple stakeholder voices.

Details

Corporate Communications: An International Journal, vol. 22 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1356-3289

Keywords

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