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Article
Publication date: 17 December 2021

Paul White and Gene George

Organizational leaders and human resource professionals affirm that to have (and keep) an effective workforce, understanding one’s employees is critical. Thus…

Abstract

Purpose

Organizational leaders and human resource professionals affirm that to have (and keep) an effective workforce, understanding one’s employees is critical. Thus, understanding the differences between employees of different age groups is important. Simultaneously, studies have demonstrated the significant positive impact appreciation has on the functioning of organizations. When team members feel truly valued, numerous positive benefits result, including lower staff turnover, less absenteeism, higher customer ratings and greater profitability.

Design/methodology/approach

Because individuals prefer to be shown appreciation in different ways and prior research has shown some age differences, this study examined how appreciation preferences differ across seven employee age groups. Over 190,000 individuals completed an online assessment based on the five languages of appreciation, which identifies employees’ preferred ways of receiving appreciation. The respondents were separated into seven age groups, from 19 years old and younger to 70 years old and above.

Findings

The results of an analysis of variance found that there were significant differences across groups. Although the patterns of preferences were largely the same across many groups, post hoc analyses found both the youngest and oldest age groups differed from employees in their 30s with regards to their desire for quality time. Additionally, older employees were extremely low in their desire for tangible gifts.

Originality/value

As the proportion of employees shifts from older to younger groups of employees, these results raise important implications for organizations’ approaches regarding how appreciation and other motivators should be adjusted for different groups of employees.

Details

Strategic HR Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1475-4398

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Article
Publication date: 28 October 2021

Melva B. Robertson

The purpose of this paper is to highlight how organizational leaders influenced the high 2021 turnover rates amid the COVID-19 shutdown.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to highlight how organizational leaders influenced the high 2021 turnover rates amid the COVID-19 shutdown.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper explores several factors that contributed to employee turnover intention before the pandemic and how unresolved leadership behaviors and toxic organizational cultures exacerbated circumstances that led to what is now known as The Great Resignation of 2021.

Findings

This paper suggests that while the pandemic shutdown temporarily paused employee turnover, organizational leaders missed an opportunity to retain their employees by not recognizing and changing factors that led to pre-existing employee turnover intention.

Originality/value

This paper explores solutions to help leaders support and retain current and future employees as the pandemic continues and in the event of futures crises. It offers recommendations for leadership development support to help strengthen leaders in their highly complex roles.

Details

Strategic HR Review, vol. 20 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1475-4398

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Article
Publication date: 5 November 2021

The main was to investigate the effect of entrepreneurial leadership on employee creativity and the mediating influence of psychological empowerment and psychological safety.

Abstract

Purpose

The main was to investigate the effect of entrepreneurial leadership on employee creativity and the mediating influence of psychological empowerment and psychological safety.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from the manufacturing sector in Pakistan, including textile, chemical and automobile industries. Questionnaires had three parts, one for managers and two for employees. The researchers collected data in three phases with a one-month time interval. First, employees rated statements about entrepreneurial leadership behaviours. Then, employees rated statements about psychological empowerment and psychological safety. Finally, managers rated statements related to employees’ creativity. The final sample comprised of 54 leaders and 280 employees.

Findings

Results showed that entrepreneurial leadership inspired employee creativity. In addition, psychological empowerment and psychological safety mediated the relationship between entrepreneurial leadership and employee creativity.

Originality/value

The study has practical implications. Organizations should hire managers with the entrepreneurial skills to inspire creativity. Leaders should also stress the value of the employee’s work by sharing organisational goals, as well as directing employees when tasks are complex. Meanwhile, organizations need to develop training programmes to help managers to improve their leadership skills. Entrepreneurial leaders can inspire employees by modelling behaviours, which will be psychologically empowering and ensure employees feel secure enough to be creative.

Details

Human Resource Management International Digest , vol. 30 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-0734

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Article
Publication date: 4 October 2021

Emmanuel Senior Tenakwah

Retaining talents has been a significant issue for companies globally. Recent statistics suggest that the trend is rising at an alarming rate. This paper aims at examining…

Abstract

Purpose

Retaining talents has been a significant issue for companies globally. Recent statistics suggest that the trend is rising at an alarming rate. This paper aims at examining these statistics, the driving factors, and how organisations can deal with this issue to retain current employees and to attract prospective employees.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper discusses the drivers of these high turnover rates and the associated costs. Based on these, suggestions on how to retain and attract talents are offered.

Findings

The evidence available illustrates that employee turnover continues to hamper the growth of companies and can pose existential threats to these companies. It also suggests that listening to concerns or reasons accounting for the exit of employees can go a long way to reduce the current trends.

Practical implications

The suggestions presented in this paper highlight the possibility of curbing the high rate of turnover. By taking these suggestions, organisations can avoid the enormous costs associated with employee turnover while building a healthy organisation for their employees.

Originality/value

This work is timely given the high rate of turnover recorded worldwide, even during the pandemic.

Details

Strategic HR Review, vol. 20 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1475-4398

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Article
Publication date: 25 January 2022

Weilin Wu, Wynne Chin and Yide Liu

This study aims to provide a response to calls for research on the consequences of technostress among employees in smart hotels. Based on the person–environment fit and…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to provide a response to calls for research on the consequences of technostress among employees in smart hotels. Based on the person–environment fit and job demands–resources theories, the authors offer a theoretical framework and investigate how factors affect employees’ well-being and performance. Further, the authors investigate the moderating effects of organizational learning on the relationship between technostress and employee well-being and performance.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors developed and empirically tested a research model based on a survey of 454 respondents in China. The effect of technostress was analyzed by applying the use of partial least squares structural equation modeling.

Findings

The results support that technostress negatively affects employee well-being (e.g. engagement and overall well-being) and performance. Employee well-being mediates the relationship between technostress and performance. Organizational learning has a countervailing moderating impact on employee well-being and performance. Specifically, organizational learning significantly counteracts the relationship between technostress and performance while significantly exacerbating the relationship between technostress and engagement.

Practical implications

This study contributes to an enhanced understanding of technostress in smart hotels and provides practical recommendations for assisting hotel managers in improving employee well-being and performance.

Originality/value

This work represents an early attempt to investigate the impact of technostress on employee well-being and performance in smart hotels. The countervailing moderating effect of organizational learning on employee engagement and performance is identified. In addition, this study is an initial attempt at estimating the predictive contribution of the mediating effects of employee engagement and overall well-being in the relationship between technostress and employee performance in smart hotels.

研究目的

这项研究响应了对研究智能酒店员工存在的技术压力的号召。基于人与环境的契合和工作需求——资源理论, 我们提供了一个理论框架并调查如何影响员工的幸福感和绩效的因素。此外, 我们调查了组织学习对技术压力以及员工福利和绩效关系的调节作用。

研究设计/方法/途径

我们开发并实证检验了一项基于对中国 454 名受访者的调查的研究模型。通过应用偏最小二乘结构方程模型对技术压力的影响进行分析。

研究发现

结果显示技术压力对员工幸福感产生负面影响(例如, 参与度和整体幸福感)和绩效。员工幸福感对技术压力和绩效之间的关系有显著中介作用。组织学习对员工的幸福感和表现起到了抵消性的调节作用。具体而言, 组织学习显着抵消了技术压力和绩效之间的关系, 同时显着增加技术压力和参与度之间的关系。

实践价值

本研究有助于加深对智能酒店技术人员的理解并提供实用建议以协助酒店管理人员改善员工福利和表现。

研究原创性/价值

这项研究代表了技术压力对智能酒店员工福利和绩效影响的早期尝试。本论文确定了组织学习在员工参与度和工作表现关系之间的抵消调节作用。此外, 这项研究是探索智能酒店员工参与度以及整体幸福感在技术压力与员工绩效之间关系的中介效应的初步尝试。

Details

Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Technology, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-9880

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Abstract

Details

Employer Branding for the Hospitality and Tourism Industry: Finding and Keeping Talent
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-069-2

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Book part
Publication date: 23 July 2019

Claretha Hughes, Lionel Robert, Kristin Frady and Adam Arroyos

Artificial intelligence (AI) is defined as the ability of a computer system to sense, reason, and respond to the environment. Computer systems with advanced AI can engage…

Abstract

Artificial intelligence (AI) is defined as the ability of a computer system to sense, reason, and respond to the environment. Computer systems with advanced AI can engage in sensing, reasoning, and responding in the most complex and dynamic environments. AI systems are being adapted rapidly by organizations to help manage their workforce. The reason for the popularity of AI is twofold. One, organizations now have access to huge amounts of data (i.e., big data) about their business operations which can be leveraged to make more efficient and effective management decisions. Two, advances in AI now afford organizations the ability to capture and process this data in real-time. Organizations can now incorporate the latest information into their decision making even in the most complex and dynamic competitive markets. Despite this, management through AI also presents new challenges to employees who are now both directed and held accountable by AI.

Details

Managing Technology and Middle- and Low-skilled Employees
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-077-7

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Book part
Publication date: 1 August 2019

Aleksei V. Bogoviz, Leonid F. Malinovski, Tamara G. Stroiteleva, Maxim M. Sharamko and Vera V. Dvoretskaya

Purpose: The purpose of the chapter is to determine the connection between organizational culture and specifics of the process of decision making in modern business…

Abstract

Purpose: The purpose of the chapter is to determine the connection between organizational culture and specifics of the process of decision making in modern business systems and to determine the directions of managing the organizational culture depending on the set criteria of decision making.

Methodology: A proprietary classification of the types of organizational culture of modern business systems according to the criterion of employees' involvement into decision making is offered. This classification uses two dimensions of employees' involvement into decision making for classification of the types of organizational culture of modern business systems. First dimension: interest of business manager in involvement of employees into the process of decision making. Second dimension: employees' inclination for participation in the process of making of managerial decisions. The factors that influence these dimensions are determined.

Conclusions: Connection between organizational culture and specifics of decision making in modern business systems according to the criterion of employees' involvement in decision making is determined. The minimal level of involvement envisages independent decision making by business manager without participation of employees. In this case, a lot of problems of the business system remain unsolved and possibilities remain unused. Resource intensity of decision making is the highest, and their practical implementation is complicated by employees' dissatisfaction, but this process is conducted very quickly. The medium level of involvement envisages either collective discussion, but decision making by business manager, or collection of feedback by business manager with low interest in it from employees. In this case, resource intensity of decision making is lower, and decisions could be made and implemented faster. The highest level of involvement is connected to collective decision making by employees and business manager. This allows determining problems and using possibilities of the business system with minimal resources. Though the duration of the process of decision making is the highest, solutions are implemented quickly due to employees' support.

Originality/value: The determined specifics show the necessity for considering the influence of the organizational culture on specifics of the process of decision making in modern business systems. It is substantiated that no type of organizational culture of modern business systems according to the criterion of employees' involvement in decision making can provide a guarantee of decisions' optimality. The directions of managing the organizational culture depending on the set criteria (completeness, speed, resource intensity) of decision making are recommended.

Details

Specifics of Decision Making in Modern Business Systems
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-692-7

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Book part
Publication date: 13 January 2021

Dennis Pepple, Crystal Zhang and Chioma Ofoma

At the end of this chapter, learners should be able to:

  • Explain what redundancy is.
  • Understand how to manage redundancy.
  • Calculate redundancy pay.
  • Understand the support…

Abstract

Learning Objectives

At the end of this chapter, learners should be able to:

  • Explain what redundancy is.

  • Understand how to manage redundancy.

  • Calculate redundancy pay.

  • Understand the support available for surviving employees.

Explain what redundancy is.

Understand how to manage redundancy.

Calculate redundancy pay.

Understand the support available for surviving employees.

Details

Financial and Managerial Aspects in Human Resource Management: A Practical Guide
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-612-9

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Article
Publication date: 5 July 2021

Paul White

Communicating appreciation to employees has been shown to be an important factor in contributing to employee engagement and making workplaces more effective. Research has…

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107

Abstract

Purpose

Communicating appreciation to employees has been shown to be an important factor in contributing to employee engagement and making workplaces more effective. Research has shown that employees differ in how they desire to be shown appreciation. The purpose of this paper is to examine how working remotely (vs onsite), the experience of the COVID-19 pandemic and employees’ age group impacted the ways employees want to be shown appreciation at work.

Design/methodology/approach

Using the five Languages of Appreciation as a framework (Chapman and White, 2019), over 200,000 individuals’ results from the Motivating By Appreciation Inventory were compared across various groups. The dependent variable: (Primary Language of Appreciation) was examined in light of three independent variables: work setting (onsite vs remote), timeframe (pre-COVID-19 vs during COVID-19) and age range of the employee.

Findings

Preferences for how to be shown appreciation were quite stable across work setting, timeframe and age range, suggesting that one’s preferred ways of being shown appreciation is largely an internal characteristic that is only mildly influenced by external factors. Minor trends were found when comparing various age groups and remote vs onsite employees.

Originality/value

Understanding the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on employees’ desires for appreciation is critical for organizational leaders. With vast numbers of new remote employees in the workforce, understanding how they are similar to and vary from onsite employees is paramount for addressing the needs of all team members. This study provides valuable information on both topics, as well as differences across age groups.

Details

Strategic HR Review, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1475-4398

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