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Article
Publication date: 27 July 2021

Dino A. Villegas and Alejandra Marin Marin

This paper aims to explore different strategies used by brands to target the Hispanic market via social media from the lens of the Spanish language in a multicultural…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore different strategies used by brands to target the Hispanic market via social media from the lens of the Spanish language in a multicultural country like the USA.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses a netnographic approach by drawing information from a study of the Facebook pages of 11 brands belonging to different industries.

Findings

Companies engage in four levels of cultural identity adaptation using different strategies based on ethnicity: language adaptation, identity elements, identity matching and Latino persona. The study also shows that merely translating Facebook pages do not generate high levels of communitarian interaction.

Practical implications

This study examines different strategies used by brands in the USA to target the Hispanic audience on social media to provide insights for brand managers to develop online engagement.

Originality/value

With the increase in cultural diversity in different countries and the rise of social media platforms, brand researchers need to better understand how cultural identity permeates marketing strategies in online spaces. Social media platforms such as Facebook offer flexible environments where strategies beyond product- and brand-related aspects can be used. This study extends the literature by showing the heterogeneity of cultural identity-based strategies used by companies to ensure customer engagement and brand loyalty and the impact of such strategies on users.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

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Article
Publication date: 18 June 2021

Junyun Liao, Jiawen Chen and Xuebing Dong

This study aims to examine the increasingly widespread phenomenon of brand community-swinging, which refers to a user's routine use of multiple brand communities of a brand

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the increasingly widespread phenomenon of brand community-swinging, which refers to a user's routine use of multiple brand communities of a brand across different social media. Drawing from channel complementarity theory, this study examines whether the complementarity of gratifications in four values (i.e. information value, entertainment value, social interaction value and self-presentation value) influences brand community-swinging and, in turn, cultivates brand loyalty.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire was developed to collect relevant data from users of a well-known smartphone brand. The survey yielded a total of 351 useable responses, and a structural equation model approach was used to test the hypotheses.

Findings

The results indicate that three types of gratification complementarity (information value, social interaction value and self-presentation value) have a significantly positive impact on consumers' brand community-swinging, which further fosters brand loyalty.

Originality/value

Previous research predominantly focused on the motivations and outcomes of consumers' participation within a single-brand community, but little is known about the antecedents and outcomes of brand community-swinging in a poly-social-media context. This study contributes to the brand community literature by addressing this research gap.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

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Article
Publication date: 19 June 2021

Laurence Dessart and Cleopatra Veloutsou

In an era where companies shift a part of their marketing budget to support their social media presence, very little is known about the antecedents and effects of…

Abstract

Purpose

In an era where companies shift a part of their marketing budget to support their social media presence, very little is known about the antecedents and effects of participant identification in a social media community. This paper aims to examine the antecedents of community identification in a Facebook company-managed brand community, for inactive members, using the uses and gratification theory. Brand community identification is also expected to lead to higher levels of brand loyalty for these members.

Design/methodology/approach

This research reports the results of a quantitative with survey data from 389 members of a variety of different official Facebook pages.

Findings

The results reveal that inactive members of Facebook pages can be influenced to act in a way that is beneficial for a company. Perceived human and information value of the brand Facebook page lead members to identify with a brand community and identification is a strong predictor of loyalty to the brand.

Practical implications

This paper provides suggestions to managers on the development of brand community value that can increase brand community identification and loyalty of apparently inactive brand community members.

Originality/value

By showing that brand community identification and loyalty exist for users with low activity levels, this research challenges the widely accepted idea that only highly active members are valuable in online brand communities. Specifically, it reveals the most important motivations for these members to identify with the community and be loyal to the brand.

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Article
Publication date: 16 June 2021

Robert James Thomas, Gareth Reginald Terence White and Anthony Samuel

The purpose of this research is to understand what motivates 7–11-year-old children to participate in online brand communities (OBCs). Prior research has concentrated on…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to understand what motivates 7–11-year-old children to participate in online brand communities (OBCs). Prior research has concentrated on prescriptive product categories (games and gaming), predominantly adolescent groups and the social aspects of community engagement and actual behaviour within communities, rather than the motivations to participate with the OBC. This has ultimately limited what has been gleaned, both theoretically and managerially, from this important segment.

Design/methodology/approach

An interpretive, longitudinal position is adopted, using a sample of 261 children (113 male and 148 female) from across the UK, using event-based diaries over a 12-month period, generating 2,224 entries.

Findings

Data indicate that children are motivated to participate in a brand community for four reasons: to support and ameliorate pre-purchase anxieties, resolve interpersonal conflicts, exact social dominance in terms of product ownership and perceptions of product knowledge and to actively engage in digitalised pester power. The study also reveals that certain motivational aspects such as conflict resolution and exacting dominance, are gender-specific.

Research limitations/implications

Knowledge of children’s motivation to engage with OBCs is important for marketers and brand managers alike as the data reveal markedly different stimuli when compared to known adult behaviours in the field. Given the nature of the study, scope exists for significant future research.

Practical implications

The study reveals behaviours that will assist brand managers in further understanding the complex and untraditional relationships that children have with brands and OBCs.

Originality/value

This study makes a novel examination of a hitherto little-explored segment of consumers. In doing so, it uncovers the theoretical and practical characteristics of child consumers that contemporary, adult-focussed literature does not recognise. The paper makes an additional contribution to theory by positing four new behavioural categories relating to community engagement – dependers, defusers, demanders and dominators – and four new motivational factors which are fundamentally different from adult taxonomies – social hegemony, parental persuasion, dilemma solving and conflict resolution.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 55 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 17 June 2021

Kemal Cem Soylemez

In continuation of Soylemez (2021), this study utilized equity theory and investigated how personal factors (personality traits) and community factors (ownership…

Abstract

Purpose

In continuation of Soylemez (2021), this study utilized equity theory and investigated how personal factors (personality traits) and community factors (ownership) influence relative generation of brand-oriented and community-oriented content.

Design/methodology/approach

A study of A/B testing was conducted with 104 online brand community (OBC) participants who had been active in an OBC in the last 30 days.

Findings

Members with a high level of conscientiousness, extroversion and neuroticism generate more brand-oriented content than community-oriented content. Openness to experience, agreeableness and community ownership have been found to have no significant effects.

Practical implications

This research helps marketing practitioners on whether they should build their own online brand communities. The study also suggests that brands should adjust their community strategies based on the personality traits of community members and expectations from the community.

Originality/value

This is the first study that investigates how personality traits and community ownership influence the generation of different types of user-generated content (UGC).

Details

Journal of Research in Interactive Marketing, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7122

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Article
Publication date: 9 April 2021

Danita van Heerden and Melanie Wiese

The purpose of this paper is to explore consumers’ motivations for engaging in Facebook brand communities, and what outcomes brands can gain from online engagement.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore consumers’ motivations for engaging in Facebook brand communities, and what outcomes brands can gain from online engagement.

Design/methodology/approach

An online consumer panel was used to collect data through convenience sampling; 497 useable questionnaires were collected.

Findings

The results of the structural equation modelling show that hedonic motivations are more prevalent in Facebook brand communities than utilitarian motivations. When considering the outcomes of online engagement, loyalty towards the brand community is the strongest outcome, followed by word-of-mouth and purchase intention.

Research limitations/implications

This research indicates that marketers should focus on creating content on Facebook brand communities that appeals to the hedonic needs of consumers, such as brand likeability, entertainment and interpersonal utility. This type of content will motivate members of these brand communities to engage online. When consumers engage online, it creates benefits for the brand such as loyalty, word-of-mouth and purchase intention.

Originality/value

This study presents a framework for investigating consumers’ motivation to engage online, based on a theoretical underpinning of both sense of community theory and uses and gratification theory. It also identifies three outcomes for brands that explain why it is worthwhile for firms to invest in engaging with consumers in Facebook brand communities while including a wide range of brand communities.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 38 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Book part
Publication date: 7 November 2011

Robin Canniford

Purpose – This conceptual chapter clarifies concepts of marketplace community.Methodology/Approach – Through a review of selected CCT studies, the chapter explores and…

Abstract

Purpose – This conceptual chapter clarifies concepts of marketplace community.

Methodology/Approach – Through a review of selected CCT studies, the chapter explores and reviews theories of subcultures of consumption, brand communities and consumer tribes.

Findings – Subcultures of consumption, brand communities and consumer tribes exhibit divergent qualities that are summarised in a typology of communities.

Research implications – The perspectives offered by tribal studies present powerful tools that compliment subcultural and brand community approaches to understanding the construction of marketplace cultures.

Practical implications – Theory that improves the understanding of different features of marketplace communities can help marketing practitioners to determine more appropriate communal marketing strategies.

Originality/Value of paper – This chapter recommends a consistent and commonly shared set of descriptive and theoretical terms for different kinds of marketplace community.

Details

Research in Consumer Behavior
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-116-9

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Article
Publication date: 17 March 2021

Yongqiang Sun, Cailian Zhao and Xiao-Liang Shen

Customers' continuous value creation (e.g. voice) is an important research issue for the success of brand virtual community (BVC) and new product development, while it is…

Abstract

Purpose

Customers' continuous value creation (e.g. voice) is an important research issue for the success of brand virtual community (BVC) and new product development, while it is rarely studied from a firm perspective. The purpose of the present study is to investigate how firm attributes exert influences on continuous voice intention in brand virtual communities.

Design/methodology/approach

The data were collected through a survey in mobile brand virtual communities in China, and 291 valid responses for data analysis were included to test the research model by using partial least squares (PLSs).

Findings

The results show that intrinsic motivation to voice is positively associated with continuous voice intention. Furthermore, the impact of brand identification on intrinsic motivation is found to be fully mediated by community identification. Customer orientation has a positive effect on perceived openness, and both customer orientation and perceived openness positively affect customers' brand identification and community identification.

Originality/value

Although prior studies have examined some variables relevant to voice behavior, few studies have recognized the influence of firm attributes toward the BVC on sustained voice intention. To fill this research gap, the authors propose a research model to shed light on the role of firm attributes by classifying them into brand- vs community-based firm attributes, which affect intrinsic motivation through two types of social identification, namely brand identification and community identification.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 121 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 29 December 2016

María Sicilia, Mariola Palazón and Manuela López

Brand pages are a very popular tool for companies to communicate with consumers in SNSs. Although brand pages could be considered virtual brand communities, they differ in…

Abstract

Purpose

Brand pages are a very popular tool for companies to communicate with consumers in SNSs. Although brand pages could be considered virtual brand communities, they differ in several aspects. Thus, this chapter reviews the literature on brand pages attending to the main differences with other virtual communities, the motivations to join brand pages and its consequences for consumers and brands.

Methodology/approach

The studies reviewed have allowed us to identify the main characteristics of brand pages as a communication tool, as well as the definition of an important research agenda for this topic.

Findings

We have identified the main unique aspects that characterize brand pages as a virtual brand community. The motivations to become members of brand pages are analyzed as well as the positive consequences of these pages on the marketing variables. We also identified the research needs on brand pages.

Social implications

This chapter can be useful to both, marketers, by showing them how brand pages work and what motivate consumers to join it; and researchers, by showing them the main gaps on brand pages that should be addressed in future studies.

Originality/value

This chapter highlights the role of brand pages as a communication tool. It constitutes an attempt to review the literature and organize knowledge on brand pages. The characteristics of brand pages and virtual brand communities, the motivations to participate, the consequences for the brand and an important research agenda are developed.

Details

Advertising in New Formats and Media
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-312-9

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Book part
Publication date: 22 November 2014

Henri Weijo and Jukka Rintamäki

The purpose of this study is to investigate how brand communities collectively react towards brand transgressions, an area where previous research has been scant.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate how brand communities collectively react towards brand transgressions, an area where previous research has been scant.

Methodology/approach

This study adopts a netnographic approach in studying the reactions of one particular brand community and its reactions to a marketer-initiated brand transgression.

Findings

Building on coping theory, we find evidence of brand community coping, a temporally bounded process in which the community seeks to come to terms with and even overturn the transgression. Overall, we define the brand community coping process as unfolding through three overlapping and temporally bounded stages of (1) making the problem communal, (2) exploring the problem’s meaning, and (3) co-creating responses.

Originality/value

Studies of consumer coping particularly in cases of brand transgressions have predominantly adopted an individualistic approach to coping, or have treated communities as coping resources for individual consumers. This study is the first study to truly look at brand communities’ collective coping endeavors. We also offer managerial implications by questioning the overtly positive tone of brand co-creation literature and underline potential threats to marketers when consumers decide to use their co-creative practices to punish the marketer.

Details

Consumer Culture Theory
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-158-9

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