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Article
Publication date: 14 July 2022

Junyun Liao, Wei Wang, Peng Du and Raffaele Filieri

This paper aims to explore whether or not and how brand community supportive climates (information- versus emotion-supportive climates) have an impact on…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore whether or not and how brand community supportive climates (information- versus emotion-supportive climates) have an impact on consumer-to-consumer helping behavior.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey of users of cell phone brand communities was conducted, and data from 413 participants were used to validate the hypotheses of this study.

Findings

Results indicated that emotion- and information-supportive climates enhance consumer-to-consumer helping behavior through consumer–community relationships (i.e. brand community identification and brand community commitment).

Research limitations/implications

To enhance the external validity of this research, future studies could investigate other settings (e.g. social media-based brand communities and brands of other product types) in countries with different religious beliefs.

Practical implications

Marketers should create an environment where consumers feel informationally and emotionally supported within the brand community, thereby enabling the former to enhance their relationships with their brand communities and ultimately increase consumers' helping behavior.

Originality/value

By dividing the supportive climate into two parts, the current study enriched the literature on community climate. Moreover, the authors complemented and expanded the literature on consumer helping behavior.

Details

Journal of Research in Interactive Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7122

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 7 November 2011

Robin Canniford

Purpose – This conceptual chapter clarifies concepts of marketplace community.Methodology/Approach – Through a review of selected CCT studies, the chapter explores and…

Abstract

Purpose – This conceptual chapter clarifies concepts of marketplace community.

Methodology/Approach – Through a review of selected CCT studies, the chapter explores and reviews theories of subcultures of consumption, brand communities and consumer tribes.

Findings – Subcultures of consumption, brand communities and consumer tribes exhibit divergent qualities that are summarised in a typology of communities.

Research implications – The perspectives offered by tribal studies present powerful tools that compliment subcultural and brand community approaches to understanding the construction of marketplace cultures.

Practical implications – Theory that improves the understanding of different features of marketplace communities can help marketing practitioners to determine more appropriate communal marketing strategies.

Originality/Value of paper – This chapter recommends a consistent and commonly shared set of descriptive and theoretical terms for different kinds of marketplace community.

Details

Research in Consumer Behavior
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-116-9

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 29 December 2016

María Sicilia, Mariola Palazón and Manuela López

Brand pages are a very popular tool for companies to communicate with consumers in SNSs. Although brand pages could be considered virtual brand communities, they differ in…

Abstract

Purpose

Brand pages are a very popular tool for companies to communicate with consumers in SNSs. Although brand pages could be considered virtual brand communities, they differ in several aspects. Thus, this chapter reviews the literature on brand pages attending to the main differences with other virtual communities, the motivations to join brand pages and its consequences for consumers and brands.

Methodology/approach

The studies reviewed have allowed us to identify the main characteristics of brand pages as a communication tool, as well as the definition of an important research agenda for this topic.

Findings

We have identified the main unique aspects that characterize brand pages as a virtual brand community. The motivations to become members of brand pages are analyzed as well as the positive consequences of these pages on the marketing variables. We also identified the research needs on brand pages.

Social implications

This chapter can be useful to both, marketers, by showing them how brand pages work and what motivate consumers to join it; and researchers, by showing them the main gaps on brand pages that should be addressed in future studies.

Originality/value

This chapter highlights the role of brand pages as a communication tool. It constitutes an attempt to review the literature and organize knowledge on brand pages. The characteristics of brand pages and virtual brand communities, the motivations to participate, the consequences for the brand and an important research agenda are developed.

Details

Advertising in New Formats and Media
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-312-9

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 22 November 2014

Henri Weijo and Jukka Rintamäki

The purpose of this study is to investigate how brand communities collectively react towards brand transgressions, an area where previous research has been scant.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate how brand communities collectively react towards brand transgressions, an area where previous research has been scant.

Methodology/approach

This study adopts a netnographic approach in studying the reactions of one particular brand community and its reactions to a marketer-initiated brand transgression.

Findings

Building on coping theory, we find evidence of brand community coping, a temporally bounded process in which the community seeks to come to terms with and even overturn the transgression. Overall, we define the brand community coping process as unfolding through three overlapping and temporally bounded stages of (1) making the problem communal, (2) exploring the problem’s meaning, and (3) co-creating responses.

Originality/value

Studies of consumer coping particularly in cases of brand transgressions have predominantly adopted an individualistic approach to coping, or have treated communities as coping resources for individual consumers. This study is the first study to truly look at brand communities’ collective coping endeavors. We also offer managerial implications by questioning the overtly positive tone of brand co-creation literature and underline potential threats to marketers when consumers decide to use their co-creative practices to punish the marketer.

Details

Consumer Culture Theory
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-158-9

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 2 September 2016

Bernard Paranque and Bernard Cova

The aim of the chapter is to focus on the connections between three types of actors who build the new world of brands – consumers, marketers, and financier – by focusing…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of the chapter is to focus on the connections between three types of actors who build the new world of brands – consumers, marketers, and financier – by focusing on the co-creation of value between the brand community and the company owning the brand.

Methodology/approach

The chapter use three case vignettes to highlight the dual process at play when a community of consumers co-create brand value.

Findings

The chapter not only highlights a value-creating trajectory for companies but also shows how a reverse process can destroy value for the very same companies. It suggests that marketers’ desire to maximize the value co-created between the company and the community in order to answer the financial requirement of brand valuation could damage the value co-creation process. According to our case vignettes’ results, these marketers are exposing themselves to the risk that consumers/fans will rebel as a result of this branding maximization, leading in return to the creation of a competitor in the form of a community brand.

Research limitations/implications

Future research will have to investigate how by cutting across organizational boundaries and functional areas, brand communities would reshape the marketing–finance interface.

Practical implications

The chapter stresses the need for companies to manage carefully the triadic relationship community/marketing/finance in order to avoid the development of a reverse brand value destruction process. In addition, the chapter contributes to research on the marketing–finance interface by highlighting the need to look beyond this level of interaction when it comes to branding.

Originality/value

Starting with the principle that consumers grouped into communities are increasingly responsible for making brands through their value-creating practices, the chapter highlights the problems raised by the company’s will to transform them into value for shareholders.

Details

Finance Reconsidered: New Perspectives for a Responsible and Sustainable Finance
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-980-0

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Managing Brands in 4D
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-102-1

Article
Publication date: 10 June 2022

Miguel Martim Leal, Beatriz Casais and João F. Proença

This study aims to explore the role of local community in tourism co-creation. Despite the importance of internal stakeholders, there is a dearth of research on the…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore the role of local community in tourism co-creation. Despite the importance of internal stakeholders, there is a dearth of research on the process of place branding co-creation with the local community, considering their interconnections and influencing relationships.

Design/methodology/approach

An old and picturesque local market under a rebranding process was used as a case study. The research involved 10 interviews with market vendors to understand their views regarding place identity, their involvement in brand co-creation, their expectations about the process and the perceived results of such co-creation. Public information was also collected as secondary data to illustrate the rebranding process.

Findings

The vendor community had limited involvement in the market rebranding and felt they should have been more widely involved in the decisions as a group rather than individually. However, their satisfaction with the results of the rebranding led to the continuity of the sense of place and to the proud adoption of the new brand.

Practical implications

This study proposes greater integration of local communities as important internal stakeholders of place branding in addition to residents and suggests group meetings to involve the local community in the co-creation process.

Originality/value

This paper explores the context of a vendor community in a local market. This context has deserved little attention in the tourism literature. This study reflects the importance of local community to co-create place brands from a group perspective, taking into consideration. their roles, rights, responsibilities and relationships.

目的

本研究探讨了地方社区在旅游共同创造中的作用。尽管内部利益相关者很重要, 但关于地方品牌与当地社区共同创造的过程, 考虑他们之间的相互联系和影响关系的研究却很缺乏。

设计/方法

一个古老的、风景如画的地方市场在品牌重塑的过程中被作为案例研究。研究涉及对市场商贩的10次访谈, 以了解他们对地方身份的看法, 他们对品牌共同创造的参与, 他们对这一过程的期望, 以及对这种共同创造结果的感知。此外, 还收集了公共信息作为二级数据来说明品牌重塑的过程。

研究结果

供应商群体对市场品牌重塑的参与是有限的, 他们认为自己应该作为一个团体而不是个人更广泛地参与决策。然而, 他们对品牌重塑的结果感到满意, 这导致了地方感的延续和对新品牌的自豪采用。

原创性

本文探讨了一个地方市场中的供应商社区的背景。这一背景在旅游文献中几乎不值得关注。这项研究反映了当地社区从团体的角度共同创造地方品牌的重要性, 考虑到他们的角色、权利、责任和关系。

实际意义

本研究提出, 除了居民之外, 当地社区也是地方品牌建设的重要内部利益相关者, 并建议召开小组会议, 让当地社区参与到共同创造的过程中。

Objetivo

Este estudio analiza el papel de la comunidad local en la cocreación turística. A pesar de la importancia de los grupos de interés internos, existe una carencia de investigaciones sobre el proceso de cocreación de la marca del lugar con la comunidad local, teniendo en cuenta sus interconexiones y relaciones de influencia.

Diseño/enfoque

Se utilizó como caso de estudio un antiguo y pintoresco mercado local en proceso de cambio de marca. La investigación incluyó 10 entrevistas con los vendedores del mercado para conocer su opinión sobre la identidad del lugar, su participación en la cocreación de la marca, sus expectativas sobre el proceso y los resultados percibidos de dicha cocreación. También se recogió información procedente de datos secundarios para ilustrar el proceso de cambio de marca.

Resultados

La comunidad de vendedores tuvo una participación limitada en el cambio de marca del mercado y consideró que debería haber participado más ampliamente en las decisiones como grupo y no de forma individual. Sin embargo, su satisfacción con los resultados de la renovación de la marca condujo a la continuidad del sentido del lugar y a la adopción complacida de la nueva marca.

Originalidad

Este trabajo explora el contexto de una comunidad de vendedores en un mercado local. Este contexto ha recibido poca atención en la literatura turística. Este estudio refleja la importancia de la comunidad local para co-crear marcas de lugar desde una perspectiva de grupo, teniendo en cuenta sus roles, derechos, responsabilidades y relaciones.

Implicaciones prácticas

Este estudio propone una mayor integración de las comunidades locales como importantes actores internos de la marca de lugar, además de los residentes, y sugiere la celebración de reuniones de grupo para implicar a la comunidad local en el proceso de cocreación.

Article
Publication date: 28 February 2022

Bobby J. Calder

Customer interactions are integral to service brands. Indeed, many product brands have added services in order to create more opportunity for customer interaction. This…

Abstract

Purpose

Customer interactions are integral to service brands. Indeed, many product brands have added services in order to create more opportunity for customer interaction. This paper deals with the strategic use of customer interactions to build a strong brand. Customer interaction strategy has evolved considerably beyond traditional sales and advertising in how customer interactions are conducted. Yet the Pareto rule (e.g. 80% of sales from 20% of customers) continues to guide who brands interact with. Conventional wisdom is that firms should target heavy users or customers high on the recency, frequency and monetary (RFM) value of purchases. The purpose of this conceptual paper is to examine how brands can use brand purpose and brand communities to target light users and even nonuser stakeholders as well.

Design/methodology/approach

There is reason to hypothesize that brands can go beyond the heavy user limit of targeting customer interactions by developing brands around purpose. Purpose can be based on engagement with personal goals or values or on societal values about doing good for others. Brand purpose can be reinforced by either life purpose brand communities or societal purpose brand communities.

Findings

The paper reviews findings in the brand interaction, brand purpose and brand communities literature.

Research limitations/implications

The two types of brand purposes and brand communities offer the possibility of growing a brand by targeting customer interactions at light users and nonuser stakeholders.

Practical implications

There are important future research issues to be addressed, but this approach could increase the value of brands to consumers and extend the life cycle of brands for organizations.

Social implications

Furthermore, the concept of societal brand purpose could allow firms to focus on creating shareholder value as well as addressing social and environmental problems.

Originality/value

This paper broadens the current conception of customer interaction strategy and is thus relevant to relationship and experience marketing.

Details

Journal of Service Management, vol. 33 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-5818

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2021

Ying Jiang, Junyun Liao, Jiawen Chen, Yanghong Hu and Peng Du

Users' knowledge sharing provides valuable resources for brand community participants and is, therefore, critical for the viability of virtual brand communities. Drawing…

Abstract

Purpose

Users' knowledge sharing provides valuable resources for brand community participants and is, therefore, critical for the viability of virtual brand communities. Drawing from both self-determination theory (SDT) and psychological ownership theory, the paper aims to investigate the impact of fulfillment of three basic psychological needs on brand users' knowledge-sharing behavior and examines psychological ownership as a mediator.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey data consisting of 316 valid responses were collected from users of Huawei Pollen Club Community. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) confirmed the reliability and validity of measures, and hierarchical linear regression and bootstrapping were used to test all hypotheses.

Findings

Fulfillment of the need for autonomy, relatedness and competence in a virtual brand community boosts users' psychological ownership and has a positive influence on their knowledge-sharing behavior. Furthermore, psychological ownership partially mediates the relationships between the fulfillment of psychological needs and knowledge-sharing behavior. In addition, the authors found that when users participate in more offline brand activities, the positive impact of the fulfillment of the need for relatedness on psychological ownership is strengthened, while the positive impact of the fulfillment of the need for autonomy on psychological ownership is weakened.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to the existing literature by exploring the relationships between fulfilling users' three basic psychological needs and their knowledge-sharing behavior through the mediating role of psychological ownership. The authors also provide insight into how offline brand activities interact with the fulfillment of psychological needs in virtual brand communities.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 October 2021

Ming Chi, Paul Harrigan and Yongshun Xu

Online service brand communities (OBCs) are an essential services marketing channel and relationship marketing tool, in which social capital (SC) is a critical success…

Abstract

Purpose

Online service brand communities (OBCs) are an essential services marketing channel and relationship marketing tool, in which social capital (SC) is a critical success factor. Underpinned in social identity and social exchange theories, this paper aims to explore the effects of SC on customer brand engagement (CBE), considering the roles of collective psychological ownership (CPO), customer citizenship behaviour (CCB) and perceived community support (PCS).

Design/methodology/approach

The research model was tested using survey data from 256 participants; 137 from the Xiaomi Community and 119 from the Huawei Fan Club. Partial least squares-structural equation modelling analysis was used.

Findings

SC drives CBE. CPO and CCB are important mediators, whilst PCS is an important moderator.

Practical implications

Brand marketers need to foster SC in OBCs to achieve the maximum level of customer engagement. The authors provide recommendations as to how to build structural, relational and cognitive SC, as well as CPO, CCB and PCS. In short, brand marketers need to foster an interactive, empowering and supportive environment.

Originality/value

The authors further service research around the humanisation of technology. Specifically, OBCs are social spaces for brands and customers, and a key enabler of relationship marketing principles, such as CBE. The authors test the roles of structural, cognitive and relational SC in engagement in OBCs, through CPO and CCB. This holistic picture of engagement in OBCs is an important foundation for future service research.

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