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Article
Publication date: 4 February 2019

Shih Yung Chou and Charles Ramser

Organizational learning has long been recognized as an important determinant of organizational performance and sustainability. Existing research, however, has commonly…

Abstract

Purpose

Organizational learning has long been recognized as an important determinant of organizational performance and sustainability. Existing research, however, has commonly viewed organizational learning as a single-level, top-down and organized organizational event initiated by the leader. This particular perspective may fall short of explaining the effect of employee spontaneous workplace behaviors on organizational learning. Thus, the purpose of this paper is to develop a multilevel theoretical model exploring how an employee’s upward helping and voice behavior foster organizational learning through developing leadership capital.

Design/methodology/approach

A conceptual analysis was conducted by incorporating relevant research.

Findings

This paper proposes the following. First, an employee’s upward helping increases a leader’s human capital and social capital. Second, the leader’s human capital and social capital enhance the employee’s psychological empowerment and knowledge leadership. Third, the employee’s psychological empowerment leads to employee voice behavior. Fourth, employee voice behavior strengthens knowledge leadership. Finally, knowledge leadership promotes organizational learning.

Originality/value

This paper provides a theoretical framework for future research attempting to understand organizational learning from a multilevel, bottom-up perspective. Practically, this paper offers several implications that help promote organizational learning through encouraging employee upward helping and voice behavior.

Details

The Learning Organization, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-6474

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 11 March 2019

Shih Yung Chou, Charles Ramser and Tree Chang

The purpose of this paper is to develop a theoretical model that describes when helping is considered helping from the recipient’s point of view.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop a theoretical model that describes when helping is considered helping from the recipient’s point of view.

Design/methodology/approach

The theoretical model was conceptually developed by drawing upon attribution theory, self-consistency theory and social cognitive theory, as well as relevant literature.

Findings

The authors propose that receiving help encompasses three sequential stages: the pre-help-receiving stage, the help-receiving stage and the post-help-receiving stage. Additionally, the authors theorize that the more other-oriented helping motives are attributed by the recipient, the more likely the recipient views the helper’s help as helping, that the more self-esteem preserving behaviors along with helping actions the recipient receives from the helper, the more likely the recipient views the helper’s help as helping and that the more gaps between actual and desired level of task performance are closed by the helper’s help, the more likely the recipient views the helper’s help as helping.

Originality/value

From a theoretical standpoint, this paper offers a process approach that may guide future research on help receiving in organizations.

Details

International Journal of Organization Theory & Behavior, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1093-4537

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Article
Publication date: 13 March 2020

Shih Yung Chou, Jiaxi Luo and Charles Ramser

The purpose of this study is to examine student sentiments regarding high-quality vs low-quality teaching.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine student sentiments regarding high-quality vs low-quality teaching.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses a text mining technique to identify the positive and negative patterns of student sentiments from student evaluations of teaching (SET) provided on Ratemyprofessors.com. After identifying the key positive and negative sentiments, this study performs generalized linear regressions and calculates cumulative logits to analyze the impact of key sentiments on high- and low-quality teaching.

Findings

Results from 6,705 SET provided on Ratemyprofessors.com indicated that students express different sets of sentiments regarding high- vs low-quality teaching. In particular, the authors found positive sentiments such as passionate, straightforward, accessible, hilarious, sweet, inspiring and clear to be predictive of high-quality teaching. Additionally, negative sentiments such as disorganized, rude, difficult, confusing and boring were significantly related to low-quality teaching.

Originality/value

This study is one of the first few studies confirming that high- and low-quality teaching are not completely opposite to each other from the student’s perspective. That is, the presence of high-quality teaching does not necessarily mean the absence of low-quality teaching. As such, this study provides an important theoretical base for future researchers who wish to explore approaches for improving faculty teaching in the higher education setting. Additionally, this study offers educators some recommendations that may help students experience positive sentiments while minimizing negative sentiments.

Details

Journal of International Education in Business, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-469X

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Article
Publication date: 7 May 2019

Shih Yung Chou and Charles Ramser

The purpose of this paper is to develop a theoretical model that addresses how student citizenship behavior (CB) may be motivated by management of impression in a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop a theoretical model that addresses how student citizenship behavior (CB) may be motivated by management of impression in a team-based project using peer evaluations.

Design/methodology/approach

This study applies impression management (IM) theory as the theoretical lens to explore the impact of IM tactics, in the forms of task-, self- and peer-focused tactics, on student CB in a team-based project using peer evaluations.

Findings

This paper posits that task-, self- and peer-focused IM tactics positively influence a student’s CB in a team-based project when peer evaluations are used. Furthermore, it is proposed that the relative weight of a peer evaluation strengthens the relationship between the three IM tactics and a student’s CB.

Originality/value

From a theoretical standpoint, this study extends IM–CB relationship from the employment setting to the academic setting. More importantly, this study offers crucial recommendations for instructors that may help improve the effectiveness of peer evaluations.

Details

Journal of International Education in Business, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-469X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 11 June 2018

Shih Yung Chou

The purpose of this paper is to develop a theoretical model describing how immigrant employees’ organizational citizenship behaviors (OCBs) are influenced by their…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop a theoretical model describing how immigrant employees’ organizational citizenship behaviors (OCBs) are influenced by their immigrant status. Additionally, this study attempts to explore the mediating role of perceived job mobility as well as the moderating role of organizational tenure in the relationship between immigrant status and OCBs.

Design/methodology/approach

A conceptual analysis was performed.

Findings

Drawing upon social identity, self-categorization, and impression management theories, this study proposes the following. First, an immigrant employee’s perceived different categorization of employment and organizational status will have a negative impact on his or her challenge-oriented OCB. Second, an immigrant employee’s perceived categorization of employment and organizational status will have a positive impact on his or her affiliation-oriented OCB. Third, perceived job mobility mediates the relationship between the perceived different categorization of employment and organizational status and challenge- and affiliation-oriented OCBs of an immigrant employee. Finally, an immigrant employee’s organizational tenure weakens (or strengthens) the negative (or positive) impact of immigrant status on challenge-oriented (or affiliation-oriented) OCB.

Originality/value

From a theoretical standpoint, this study provides a novel theoretical base that guides future research on immigrant employees’ OCBs in organizations. More importantly, this study offers recommendations that help maximize the effectiveness of immigrant employee’s OCBs.

Details

Journal of Global Mobility: The Home of Expatriate Management Research, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-8799

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 13 February 2017

Katelin Barron and Shih Yung Chou

This paper aims to develop a spirituality mode of firm strategic planning processes that incorporate four basic firm spirituality elements, namely, transcendence, an…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to develop a spirituality mode of firm strategic planning processes that incorporate four basic firm spirituality elements, namely, transcendence, an inexhaustible source of will, a basic and supreme power and interconnectedness and oneness, used for promoting corporate and community sustainability.

Design/methodology/approach

A conceptual analysis was performed.

Findings

Drawing upon prior research, this paper suggests that there are four major spiritual elements of the firm, namely, transcendence, an inexhaustible source of will, a basic and supreme power and interconnectedness and oneness. Additionally, this paper proposes that to promote long-term sustainability and survival of the firm and community, firms can place strong emphasis on firm transcendence when establishing the vision and mission statements. Moreover, firms may need to assess environmental conditions based upon an inexhaustible source of will. Furthermore, when formulating and selecting strategic alternatives, firms can utilize a basic and supreme power. Finally, firms may implement selected strategic alternatives and strategic controls with interconnectedness and oneness mentality.

Originality/value

This paper is one of the first studies that develop a spirituality mode of strategic planning processes focusing on both corporate and community sustainability.

Details

Society and Business Review, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5680

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 18 July 2019

Thuy D. Nguyen, Shih Yung Chou, Charles Blankson and Phillip Wilson

This paper aims to offer a systematic view of religious consumption and its iterative influences on consumers, as well as their differences in attitudes, values and behaviors.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to offer a systematic view of religious consumption and its iterative influences on consumers, as well as their differences in attitudes, values and behaviors.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a mixed-method approach – both qualitative and quantitative – the study develops religious self-transformation and self-categorization scales to empirically evaluate the hypotheses.

Findings

The convergence of consumption, self-identification and religious attitudes and behaviors proffer an essentially subjective concept useful in understanding the existential reflection and supernatural orientation that individuals may seek through consumption. Cluster analysis (based on product, services, media and practices) reveals four quadrants. The non-religious (religious) group has low (high) consumption in all four consumption categories Self-categorization (self-transformation) group has high (low) level of product consumption, but low (high) in all three other categories. This research presented four invisible identities that are visibly different in terms of life satisfaction, religious brand preference, dollars spending on religious products and monetary donation.

Research limitations/implications

This research only considers one medium-size city as opposed to all types of cities. All religious affiliated and nonaffiliated respondents are included in the total sample.

Practical implications

The study offers new insights into the triadic relationship between religious self-identification, religious consumption, and the marketplace that can be used in branding, segmentation, targeting, positioning, and persuasive advertising, public relation and social media, and services marketing.

Social implications

Religion addresses the nature of existence. In this religion–consumer–brand nexus, consumption is a way for consumers to experience and immense themselves in the sacred to solidify, communicate, transform, improve and transport who they are capitalizing on religious self-identification can affectively promote positive social change.

Originality/value

This work proposes four invisible identities that are different in consumption of religious products and services in terms of patterns and purposes. These groups of consumers shape the marketplace through the derived utility of their religious consumption based on their self-identification, which in turn influences their religious brand preference.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 29 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

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Article
Publication date: 13 June 2016

Shih Yung Chou and Tree Chang

This paper aims to develop a theoretical model describing how newcomers’ team-member exchange (TMX), team identification and workplace loneliness may be affected by…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to develop a theoretical model describing how newcomers’ team-member exchange (TMX), team identification and workplace loneliness may be affected by existing team members’ rejections to the newcomers’ interpersonal helping behavior (IHB).

Design/methodology/approach

A theoretical analysis was performed.

Findings

The authors propose the following propositions. First, higher levels of IHB rejections result in lower levels of TMX and team identification and higher levels of workplace loneliness experienced by a newcomer. Second, a newcomer’s TMX mediates the relationship between IHB rejections and the newcomer’s workplace loneliness and team identification. Finally, a newcomer’s team identification mediates the relationship between IHB rejections and the newcomer’s workplace loneliness.

Practical implications

This theoretical study provides the following managerial implications. First, managers need to proactively implement tactics that help satisfy newcomers’ affiliation needs through the development of strong formal work relationships with existing members. Second, managers are advised to consider the use of tactics that facilitate the development of effective informal relationships between newcomers and existing team members upon the entry of the team. Third, managers need to implement informal social events where newcomers have the opportunity to exhibit their helpful behaviors. Fourth, managers should periodically inform existing team members of some common anxieties and fears of newcomers that are triggered by entering new interpersonal environments. Finally, managers may utilize mentoring programs that help facilitate newcomers’ accurate interpretations of phenomena occurring around them.

Originality/value

This theoretical study is the first study that examines consequences of IHB rejections in organizations.

Details

Team Performance Management, vol. 22 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

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Article
Publication date: 8 May 2017

Katelin Barron and Shih Yung Chou

This paper aims to discuss how religiously and non-religiously affiliated individuals may view the three core workplace spiritual values: transcendence, existence of a…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to discuss how religiously and non-religiously affiliated individuals may view the three core workplace spiritual values: transcendence, existence of a higher power and interconnectedness. Additionally, this paper studies how the contrasts between the views of religiously and non-religiously affiliated individuals about the three core spiritual values affect their performance of social responsibility initiatives.

Design/methodology/approach

A conceptual analysis was used.

Findings

This paper suggests that religiously and non-religiously affiliated individuals view the three core spiritual values differently. Drawing upon the three core spiritual values viewed by religiously and non-religiously affiliated individuals, this paper proposes the following. First, religiously affiliated individuals will focus on implementing social responsibility initiatives for a longer time orientation compared to non-religiously affiliated individuals. Second, when engaging in social responsibility, religiously affiliated individuals will focus on implementing a smaller scope of social responsibility initiatives than non-religiously affiliated individuals. Finally, religiously affiliated individuals will focus on implementing a larger scale of social responsibility initiatives than non-religiously affiliated individuals.

Originality/value

This paper is one of the very first studies addressing how religiously and non-religiously affiliated individuals view core values of spirituality. Additionally, this paper advances the literature by contrasting how religiously and non-religiously affiliated individuals engage in socially responsible initiatives in accordance with how they view spirituality.

Details

Journal of Global Responsibility, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2041-2568

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 14 January 2021

Shih Yung Chou, Katelin Barron and Charles Ramser

Drawing upon conservation of resources (COR) and attribution theories, prior research in helping behavior has mainly focused on an independent view of the helper’s…

Abstract

Purpose

Drawing upon conservation of resources (COR) and attribution theories, prior research in helping behavior has mainly focused on an independent view of the helper’s personal resources. This perspective, however, falls short of capturing the comparative nature of personal resources and attributions in a helping context. The purpose of this paper is, therefore, to develop a theoretical model that helps predict employees’ decisions to help or not to help.

Design/methodology/approach

A theoretical model was developed by integrating social comparison, COR and attribution theories.

Findings

The theoretical model proposes the following. First, when employees perceive that they have fewer personal resources than a coworker who needs help, they are less likely to help. Second, when employees perceive that they have more personal resources than a coworker who needs help, they make causal attributions as to why the coworker failed to deploy personal resources. Finally, when employees have more personal resources than a coworker who needs help, they are more likely to help if they make situational, unstable and uncontrollable attributions to the coworker’s failure to deploy personal resources.

Originality/value

This paper extends the literature by offering a theoretical model that emphasizes comparisons and attributions of personal resources in a helping context. Additionally, this paper offers several managerial implications that help managers manage helping behavior effectively.

Details

Management Research Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8269

Keywords

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