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Article
Publication date: 30 April 2021

Elizabeth Linkewich, Shelley Sharp, Denyse Richardson and Jocelyne McKellar

The purpose of this paper is to develop an infrastructure and leadership capacity for a sustainable approach to collaborative change in a complex health-care system.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop an infrastructure and leadership capacity for a sustainable approach to collaborative change in a complex health-care system.

Design/methodology/approach

An infrastructure for system change and a mechanism to build capacity for change leadership was developed. This involved (1) using a community of a practice model to create a change community, (2) developing an iterative engagement and change process and (3) integrating collaborative change leadership skills and knowledge development within the process. Change leadership was evaluated using Wenger's phases of value creation.

Findings

A change community of 62 members across 19 organizations codeveloped a change process that aligns with Cooperrider's 4D Cycle. The change community demonstrated application of change leadership learnings throughout the change process.

Originality/value

A tailored approach was required to support sustainable transformational change in the Toronto stroke system. This novel methodology provides a framework for broader application to systems change in other complex systems that support both local and system-wide ownership of the work.

Details

International Journal of Public Leadership, vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4929

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 6 March 2012

Imtiaz Hussain

As a growing literature points out (Aronowitz, 2009, pp. 165–213), HT becomes criminal because it involves displacing, exploiting and commercializing a human being, all of these…

Abstract

As a growing literature points out (Aronowitz, 2009, pp. 165–213), HT becomes criminal because it involves displacing, exploiting and commercializing a human being, all of these necessitating transportation, trade and torture to varying degrees to survive and succeed (Nair, 2010, pp. 12–19). John T. Picarelli informs us, these began ‘in the Americas’ from 1502, ‘when Portuguese traders brought the first African slaves to the Caribbean’ (Picarelli, 2011, p. 180, but see all of Chapter 9). African slaves continued to be imported into the United States until 1808, but by the time the 13th Amendment ‘outlawed’ indentured servitude in 1865, the 645,000 slaves shipped from Africa had multiplied beyond 4 million, to whom were added (a) Chinese women, ‘to work in brothels … to serve both the Chinese and white communities’ after the 1860s; (b) Europeans, through collusion between ‘criminal syndicates’ and ‘U.S. [law enforcement] officials’, in what was called ‘the white slave trade’ from the 1880s (Shelley, 2010, pp. 235, 237); and (c) Hispanics (Alba & Nee, 2003; Gordon, 1964; Suárez-Orozco, 1998), in tandem with the dominant U.S. migratory inflows and economic needs after the 1960s (Borjas, 1999; Huntington, 2004, pp. 30–45), and the emergence of sex tourism after the Cold War (Clift & Carter, 2000; María Agustin, 2007; Rogers, 2009; Thorbek & Bandana Pattanaik, 2002).

Details

Transnational Migration, Gender and Rights
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-202-9

Book part
Publication date: 5 December 2018

Willy Legrand and Robert Schønrock Nielsen

In this paper, we investigate the connection between ethics and aesthetics with a supporting case from the international tourism industry. Researchers in sustainable tourism have…

Abstract

In this paper, we investigate the connection between ethics and aesthetics with a supporting case from the international tourism industry. Researchers in sustainable tourism have ignored, resisted or simply been reluctant to include the aesthetic perspective in the analysis of sustainable development, social responsibility or climate adaptation. The consequence is that we know very little about the ways aesthetic affects ethical considerations among guests and travellers. A more comprehensive reconciliation of the ethical and aesthetic dimensions may lead to the recognition that a stronger emphasis on aesthetics can enhance the guest’s experience of sustainable tourism within a responsible experience economy. We argue that this economy can thrive under sophisticated capitalism.

Details

Advances in Hospitality and Leisure
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-303-6

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 April 2008

Augusto De Venanzi

Previous research has made it clear that homelessness is a social condition that finds its origins in structural causes such as poverty, lack of affordable housing, chronic…

3136

Abstract

Purpose

Previous research has made it clear that homelessness is a social condition that finds its origins in structural causes such as poverty, lack of affordable housing, chronic unemployment, and reductions in welfare support. However, in the author's view, the exclusive focus upon these structural variables fails to provide a comprehensive account of the social forces that contribute to and shape the homeless experience. The paper's aim is to contend that homelessness can also be viewed as the result of continued subordinate institutional experiences.

Design/methodology/approach

The present paper examines in depth some of the inner practices of various normative institutions, namely morality, family, and the prison and uncover the ways in which they operate in producing acute states of social and moral disempowerment, and how they affect the faculties of subordinate members to competently fend for themselves in the wider society. It relies on a set of concepts coined by authors such as E. Goffman, M. Douglas, P. Boss, and M. Foucault in looking at the incapacitating nature of the aforementioned institutions. The study compares homelessness in two national contexts – that of the USA and Japan – in aiming to demonstrate that different institutional contexts tend to produce different patterns of homelessness. The research employs both secondary quantitative and secondary qualitative data. The quantitative data are used to establish the association of homelessness and subordinate institutional experience, the quantitative to illustrate the human experience of being homeless and to present cases that illustrate the “continuity chains” formed by those experiences.

Findings

The paper finds that different institutional settings will produce different patterns of homelessness. Originality/value – The institutional approach to homelessness advocated opens new avenues of concern and research in both the comprehensive understanding and the acting upon this vital problematic.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 28 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 August 1959

THE summer is not a good time for writing editorials. In the first place it has been too warm, but more particularly, no matter how hot the topic at the time of writing, it will…

32

Abstract

THE summer is not a good time for writing editorials. In the first place it has been too warm, but more particularly, no matter how hot the topic at the time of writing, it will be cold as mutton before it eventually reaches its readers. Secondly our thoughts seem to have been devoted to anything except libraries: a little light reading perhaps, or a gentle discussion of next season's lecture programme? So now, not an editorial proper (or improper), but some editorial miscellany, beginning with the late but unregretted printing dispute. The LIBRARY WORLD has not been affected as much as some periodicals, and this issue makes its appearance only some three weeks later than planned. We have occasionally encountered comments which suggest that our journal is not anticipated each month with undue pleasure, and is quickly placed on the Chief Librarian's desk, from which honourable position its subsequent circulation is frequently delayed. Many libraries do not appear to have a professional journal circulation scheme, and this is a regrettable state of affairs. It is important that the younger members of the profession should be well informed about library affairs, and only the regular perusal of periodicals can achieve this. May we recommend that Chiefs institute and maintain a circulation programme in their libraries; we hear that it is much appreciated in those libraries which already do so.

Details

New Library World, vol. 61 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Article
Publication date: 9 May 2023

Lisa Eckenwiler, Matthew R. Hunt, Jan Joy Louise G. Crismo, Elyse Conde, Shelley-Rose Hyppolite, Mayfourth Luneta, Isabel Munoz-Beaulieu, Handreen Mohammed Saeed and Lisa Schwartz

In this paper, the authors propose a new lens to examine international humanitarian organizations' responsibilities in the context of project closure, what authors call “an ethics…

Abstract

Purpose

In this paper, the authors propose a new lens to examine international humanitarian organizations' responsibilities in the context of project closure, what authors call “an ethics of the temporary”. The authors offer this as an orienting ethical ideal to facilitate the moral imagination of humanitarian planners, practitioners and stakeholders.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors drew on recent philosophical work on responsibilities for global justice to analyze an ethical concern inherent to humanitarian practice, the proper scope of responsibility in the context of closure of humanitarian projects.

Findings

The ethics of the temporary includes four elements: situating humanitarian action temporally with attention to the past and how it shapes a current crisis and crisis response, focusing attention on anticipating and seeking to mitigate potential harm, promoting sustainability and greater equity going forward and emphasizing inclusive, collaborative approaches. The authors propose a set of questions that can foster discussion and reflection about the scope of humanitarian responsibilities at project closure.

Practical implications

Although the authors' work is primarily conceptual, it has many practical implications for humanitarian policy and practice. It can support critical reflection and offers a process for considering the scope of responsibility at project closure and decisions around how to close a given intervention in a manner that avoids causing harm and advances equity.

Originality/value

Very little work has been done on ethical closure of humanitarian projects. Most literature offers critiques. This essay contributes a new approach to closure, the ethical ideal and practice of an ethics of the temporary.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 32 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 May 1901

The question of reprinting notable novels which have been allowed to fall out of print is somewhat different from the one discussed in previous articles. In that case the question…

Abstract

The question of reprinting notable novels which have been allowed to fall out of print is somewhat different from the one discussed in previous articles. In that case the question was as regards keeping in print popular modern novels whose titles appeared in many Public Library catalogues, to invite attention and draw inquiries from readers as to their existence. In the present case, the question concerns the advantage or utility of reprinting novels which are of some literary value, and are frequently mentioned in histories of literature, magazine articles, &c. A very considerable number of the novels mentioned below are translations of foreign works which have not yet found their way into English Public Libraries, while many are American standard novels which have not been introduced to any extent in England. Both varieties, however, will be found in the Public Libraries of the United States. But, in addition to these American and foreign works, there are certain novels which are named and described in every extensive history of English literature; which are quoted by later writers; which possess considerable claims to remembrance; and yet, so far as I can learn, are not to be had in good modern editions either in England or in America. There are first, the novels which mark the dawn of prose fiction in English literature, and which are worth reprinting if only for the use of students. Such works as Barclay's “Argenis,” Sidney's “Arcadia,” Lyly's “Euphues,” Lodge's “Rosalind,” and all the early attempts at romance are deserving of reproduction in a decent modern dress which would place them within reach of students, libraries, and the general public. The novels of Samuel Richardson are not now obtainable in a handy form, and it is surprising that no publisher of good reprints has thought of issuing nice illustrated editions of these classics. Mrs. Aphra Behn's novels are not perhaps the very best of their kind, but they are celebrated, and should be obtainable. Other well‐known (or rather notable) novels are Johnston's “History of a Guinea,” Greaves' “Spiritual Quixote,” a very clever satire on the early Methodists which has considerable value; Brooke's “Fool of Quality,” Amory's “John Buncle,” and all the best novels of this period, which have been allowed to drop into oblivion. Brooke's “Fool of Quality,” it is true, was issued in the edition prepared by Kingsley, but a cheaper one‐volume edition is also wanted, especially as I believe the other is now out of print. Then it is very remarkable that such a powerful book as Godwin's “Caleb Williams” is not to be had in a worthy edition. Mrs. Shelley's “Frankenstein,” which is a very early and good example of the horrible in fiction, has yet to be issued in a properly illustrated and handy form. Hope's “Anastasius” does not appear in a modern form, and is not easy to obtain in a nice edition; and such Eastern tales as Fraser's “Kuzzilbash,” seem to have dropped completely out of notice. Morier's “Hajji Baba” has been reissued, so far as the Persian part is concerned, but the sequel, containing the humorous account of the embassy to England, also awaits issue. To many minds, the picture of the conflict between Eastern and Western ideas presented in “Hajji Baba in England” makes it much more interesting than the original Persian story. More recent works, like Croly's “Salathiel” and Savage's “Bachelor of the Albany,” should certainly be reprinted, and kept in print, as they deserve. The latter is a work which is frequently quoted, and yet it seems to have been forgotten. It would be possible to specify many good and deserving books which are worth reprinting, but, as they are mentioned in the accompanying list, it is needless to repeat their titles.

Details

New Library World, vol. 3 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Article
Publication date: 12 September 2016

Shelley Boulianne

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the themes identified in the submissions to this volume. The findings are contextualized in recent scholarship on these themes.

2378

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the themes identified in the submissions to this volume. The findings are contextualized in recent scholarship on these themes.

Design/methodology/approach

The discussion is organized around predicting social media use among candidates, organizations, and citizens, then exploring differences in the content of social media postings among candidates, organizations, and citizens, and finally exploring the impact of social media use on mobilization and participatory inequality defined by gender, age, and socio-economic status.

Findings

This volume addresses whether social media use is more common among liberal or conservative citizens, candidates, and organizations; the level of negativity in social media discourse and the impact on attitudes; the existence of echo chambers of like-minded individuals and groups; the extent and nature of interactivity in social media; and whether social media will reinforce participation inequalities. In sum, the studies suggest that negativity and interactivity on social media are limited and mixed support for echo chambers. While social media mobilizes citizens, these citizens are those who already pre-disposed to engage in civic and political life.

Originality/value

This paper explores key topics in social media research drawing upon 60 recently published studies. Most of the studies are published in 2015 and 2016, providing a contemporary analysis of these topics.

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 40 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 May 1954

J.W. BUCHANAN

Perhaps it was because I had recently been reading Swift's Battle of the Books, but what I know for certain is that I shall always laugh at those people who tell me that libraries…

Abstract

Perhaps it was because I had recently been reading Swift's Battle of the Books, but what I know for certain is that I shall always laugh at those people who tell me that libraries are like sanctuaries, oases of peace in a raucous world. I used to believe that. Not now: not after what happened last night when I was left alone in the library. Did I say alone? Well, now, that's not quite right. But let me tell you about it.

Details

Library Review, vol. 14 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

Article
Publication date: 1 July 2006

Krishna S. Dhir

The purpose of this paper is to examine some of the problems associated with the prevailing rhetoric in corporate communication. It proposes the consideration of nonviolent…

2140

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine some of the problems associated with the prevailing rhetoric in corporate communication. It proposes the consideration of nonviolent rhetorical approaches.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper explains corporate communication's affinity for aggressive, militaristic language in terms of constraint of time, and expediency and efficiency of standardized communication strategies designed for large‐scale effectiveness. However, such communication strategies run the risk of dehumanizing the intended targets, distancing the individuals, and compromising socially responsible corporate behavior. The recent corporate scandals of unprecedented scale, occurring in spite of vast improvements in communication theory and technology, have highlighted the need for alternative approaches to corporate communication. Further, it examines the prerequisites that must exist for corporate communication based on nonviolent rhetoric to be effective. The conditions that must be present in the environment, in the corporation or its agent, and in the method of communication, for nonviolent rhetoric to prove effective are discussed.

Findings

Corporations seek to establish and modify relationships by influencing stakeholder beliefs, values, expectations and needs. Corporate rhetorical success is reflected in enhanced reputation and respectability, which in turn has significant economic consequences. To achieve these ends, corporations expend considerable effort on communication to educate, entertain and inform their stakeholders. Yet, scholars have generally neglected to study role of rhetoric and language in public relations.

Originality/value

This paper would be of value to researchers and practitioners, in the fields of corporate communication, organizational communication, public relations, and strategic management, seeking to promote, practice or otherwise influence socially responsible corporate behavior.

Details

Corporate Communications: An International Journal, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1356-3289

Keywords

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